cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Singapore Burning : Heroism and Surrender in World War II
eBook Singapore Burning : Heroism and Surrender in World War II ePub

eBook Singapore Burning : Heroism and Surrender in World War II ePub

by Colin Smith

  • ISBN: 0670913413
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Colin Smith
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Gardners Books; First edition (March 31, 2005)
  • Pages: 656
  • ePub book: 1833 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1337 kb
  • Other: txt doc lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 472

Description

Colin Smith is a historian, novelist and former war correspondent Smith lives in Nicosia with his wife Sylvia and several cats. Readers wishing to contact him or find out more about his work should visit ww. olin-smith.

Colin Smith is a historian, novelist and former war correspondent. In 1972, at the age of twenty-three, he became the Observer's chief roving reporter and spent the next thirty years covering the world's trouble spots for the Observer and the Sunday Times - from Phnom Penh to the Golan Heights, from Saigon to Sarajevo, from Nikosia to Port-au-Prince. He was named International Reporter of the Year in the 1974 and 1984 British Press Awards. Smith lives in Nicosia with his wife Sylvia and several cats.

Singapore Burning book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Singapore Burning: Heroism And Surrender In World War II as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Colin Smith is an author and award-winning journalist I have read a number of books about the fall of Singapore before, all flawed in their own way, but Colin Smith’s Singapore Burning (2005) is clearly the best written and most.

Colin Smith is an author and award-winning journalist. He covered many wars for the Observer and served terms as its Defence, Middle East, Asia and Washington correspondent. His previous book Alamein: War Without Hate (with John Bierman) was praised by John Keegan as the best book written about Alamein. I have read a number of books about the fall of Singapore before, all flawed in their own way, but Colin Smith’s Singapore Burning (2005) is clearly the best written and most detailed that I have seen to date.

As Colin Smith's new book demonstrates, the defeat was less due to acts of sensational stupidity than a more piecemeal ineptitude. The way in which the enemy achieved air and naval supremacy was the first embarrassment

As Colin Smith's new book demonstrates, the defeat was less due to acts of sensational stupidity than a more piecemeal ineptitude. The way in which the enemy achieved air and naval supremacy was the first embarrassment. The Japanese had been thought incapable of manufacturing modern aircraft, and certainly unsuited to piloting them

Find sources: "Colin Smith" journalist – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR . Singapore Burning – Heroism and Surrender in World War Two. Viking Penguin, London,( ISBN 0-14-101036-3), 2005.

Find sources: "Colin Smith" journalist – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (March 2019) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). He reported on the first Gulf War, entering Kuwait City with the US Marines, the siege of Sarajevo, and the massacres in Rwanda. He has twice been named International Reporter of the Year in the British press awards and once runner-up.

This tremendous book shows that it was. General Gordon Bennett's infantry gave way and fled by the thousand as the Japanese stormed ashore

This tremendous book shows that it was. General Gordon Bennett's infantry gave way and fled by the thousand as the Japanese stormed ashore. But seen across 60 years and by the standards of today, running away made sense. War is a mad island, on which reasonable behaviour is reversed. People 'put themselves in harm's way', as opponents of the Iraq war touchingly put it, instead of moving out of danger. They are required to disconnect instinct and stay in position as a mortar barrage approaches.

Singapore Burning - Heroism and Surrender in World War Two Viking Penguin, London, 2005. As yet, no paperback exists. site by pedalo limited.

Singapore in World War I. .18 Feb 41: Elements of the Australian 8th Division arrive in Singapore. 18 Mar 41: Grand Admiral Erich Raeder urges Hitler to convince Japan to attack Singapore. 28 Apr 41: Churchill issues a directive stating that at the present time there is no need to make provisions for the defense of Malaya and Singapore. 19 Jan 42: Day 43 of 55 of the Battle of British Malaya. 15 Feb 42: Day 17 of 17 of the Battle of Singapore. 9,000 British and Australian troops have been killed, and the remaining 80,000 are taken prisoner as Japanese troops take the city, joining 50,000 taken in the earlier Malayan Campaign to be worked as slaves.

Berry Books is commited to a hassle free returns policy. If you are not satisfied with your purchase we well give you a full refund within 14 days of the your receipt of the goods. Please feel free to contact Berry Books for any information you require. You will get a prompt reply. 4 Albany Street, Berry NSW 2535. P. 02 E. peterybooks.

Churchill called it 'the worst disaster and largest capitulation in British history.' This description of the fall of Singapore on 15 February 1942, after Lt-Gen Percival's surrender led to over 100,000 British, Australian and Indian troops falling into the hands of the Japanese, was no wartime exaggeration. The Japanese had promised that there would be no Dunkirk in Singapore and that was so - no one was spared and its fall led to imprisonment, torture and death for thousands of allied men and women. In this extraordinary book, using much new material from British, Australian, Indian and Japanese sources, Colin Smith has woven together the full and terrifying story of the fall of Singapore and its aftermath. Here, alongside cowardice and incompetence, are forgotten acts of enormous heroism; treachery yet heart-rending loyalty; Japanese compassion as well as brutality from the bravest and most capricious enemy the British ever had to face.

Comments

Samuhn Samuhn
The fall of Singapore in February 1942 was one of the epochal events of the Second World War, but it has received decidedly little coverage. It was an all-around humiliation for Commonwealth forces, to be defeated by numerically-inferior Japanese forces in just 55 days and for “fortress Singapore” to be overcome so easily. In British minds, this catastrophe is best forgotten. Nor is there a large market of historiography that focuses on Japan’s early conquests in the war, even though they are clearly of interest to military professionals. I have read a number of books about the fall of Singapore before, all flawed in their own way, but Colin Smith’s Singapore Burning (2005) is clearly the best written and most detailed that I have seen to date. Smith, a noted journalist, writes a very lively account that adds a great deal of perspective from both the Allied and Japanese sides in the campaign. Overall, an excellent piece of military historical writing. The book has seven sketch maps of indifferent quality, so be prepared to have an atlas handy.

The book begins with a brief introduction into how the British decided to build a major naval base at Singapore. I was surprised to read that Churchill had opposed fortifying Singapore in 1926 but Stanley Baldwin’s government is the one that made the decision. The base cost £60 million and was not operational until 1938, by which time Britain no longer had the military resources to defend it. Smith does an excellent job showing the lead-up to war, with the British allocating only obsolete and token forces to defend Malaya, while the Japanese were preparing for an all-out strike into Southeast Asia. Yet the British did manage to store 12,000 mustard gas shells in Singapore, which seems ridiculous. Along the way, Smith manages to humanize the opposing commanders, Percival and Yamashita. Most readers will not be aware that the first shots in the Pacific War occurred when the Japanese shot down an RAF PBY reconnaissance plane near Malaya – 10 hours before the Pearl Harbor attack.

As Smith discusses at length, the British had a contingency plan to disrupt the Japanese amphibious landings in northern Malaya, but they hesitated and executed the plan in botched fashion. As it was, the British beach defenses at Kota Baharu were formidable and inflicted great slaughter on the Japanese first wave. Yet the RAF was handicapped with ridiculously obsolete aircraft and simply melted away in Malaya. Without air cover, the British ground forces and the Royal Navy were unable to stand up to the Japanese. Smith also covers the loss of Force Z (HMS Repulse and Prince of Wales) in great detail.

Commonwealth forces attempted a delaying action in northern-central Malaya, but the appearance of Japanese tanks made this idea unworkable, since the CW forces had very few anti-tank guns. One battalion rearguard after another was overrun and scattered by small numbers of Japanese tanks. A lot of people believe that the British Army was unsuited to jungle warfare but Smith points out that they did have a few well-trained units, such as LTC Ian Stewart’s Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. This was a very good battalion, experienced in jungle field craft and it managed to ambush Japanese columns several times. Smith also points out that the British had very good artillery support, that could halt a Japanese advance when well-sited. Here and there – like at Kampar, British defenses almost gelled, but when the RAF precipitously abandoned their airbases in central Malaya it all went to pot. Smith also takes a close look at the Japanese performance, particularly in the Battle of the Slim River on 5-7 January 1942. Although the CW forces had established a defense-in-depth behind the river, the Japanese mounted a night attack with 30 medium tanks that ripped the entire scheme apart. Multiple British battalions were ruined in this action and the bulk of a division was lost.

Smith also discusses the role of Gordon Bennett’s 8th Australian Division, which was believed to be an elite formation even though some of its men were raw recruits. The Australians were initially kept in reserve but when committed to battle, they managed one very skillful ambush that demolished several Japanese companies. Unfortunately, in the retreat to Singapore, most of an Australian brigade was cut off and scattered. In the final battle for Singapore Island, the CW had a 3-1 numerical superiority in men and better artillery, but morale was rock-bottom. In fact, it was the Australians who routed when the Japanese landed, which fatally compromised the final stand. As Smith notes, there was no shortage of heroism in the Malayan campaign and it is surprising to see how many British brigade commanders were killed in action. However, the defense of Malaya was fatally undermined by poor strategic choices made prior to the war, such as the diversion of tanks and Hurricane fighters to Russia instead of the Far East. If just two Lend Lease convoys had gone to Singapore in late 1941, the CW might have had the means to stop Japanese tank attacks and destroy more bombers. Lacking the material resources to fight properly, the CW forces’ tactical execution was quickly undermined by defeatism, which turned to panic. All around, Singapore was a painful mess for the British forces, equivalent to what the French went through in 1940.
Peles Peles
Enjoyed the good balance of high level strategy, unit combat, and a leavening of individual experiences. Until reading this book I had no concept of how poorly trained and sadly equipped the troops defending Singapore were, or how commanders influenced the campaign through incompetence or by heroism. The poor showing of some of the Indian & Australian forces vis-a-vis the heroism of most is dealt with in a fair and balanced way. Finally, the history of the colony and the complicated relations between the various cultures is examined. The book is very readable; flows well, and appears well researched.
I wish the editors had provided a few basic maps through the book to give a broad view of the peninsula and the island, to show just how near & surrounded the island is to the mainland.
I recommend this book highly as the comprehensive history of the development of, & the fall of, Malaysia & Singapore.
Tisicai Tisicai
Singapore Burning by Colin Smith tries to convey the confusion and horror experienced by the British, Malayan, Chinese, and others who were on the Malayan peninsula and in Singapore during the Japanese conquest in December of 1941 and January of 1942. He also ventures into the Japanese ranks and imparts the feelings of revenge and triumph among the troops of the Rising Sun. In this endeavor he is successful. He manages to bring this to the reader by telling numerous personal stories, most of which avoid happy endings.

If you like numerous personal stories as a way of conveying history you will probably enjoy the book. The author does give overviews so the reader is aware of how the personal stories fit into the overall action. In my opinion, these overviews are the best part of the book because I dislike history as a string of personal accounts. Not that Colin Smith’s accounts are boring, it just isn’t my cup of tea.

Personal accounts aside, it is obvious the British forces in Malaya were not prepared for the Japanese onslaught. The United Kingdom had literally years to plan and prepare the Malay peninsula for an assault from the north. Their troops could have been trained for jungle combat – some were – and anti-tank guns could have been supplied in much better numbers. Or perhaps a few tanks. However, the real technical failure was a lack of air power. The machines flown by the aviators of the Empire were out of date. In addition, there was a lack of coordination throughout the battle in the air, at sea, and on the ground. Very bad decision making plagued the English from the start. The failure was so complete and occurred on so many levels that the British collapse was embarrassing, to say the least. The fall of Singapore also opened the entire area of the southwest Pacific to Japan. The author takes the time to let the reader know the extent of the debacle.

The writing style is fast flowing and not at all academic. While I got bored with the endless supply of personal stories the normal reader will probably find them engaging. A lot was going on during the fighting for Singapore and the reader is put into the thick of it. I came away with a much better understanding of why the jewel of the Empire east of India fell so dramatically.

AD2