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eBook Infidels: A History of the Conflict Between Christendom and Islam ePub

eBook Infidels: A History of the Conflict Between Christendom and Islam ePub

by Andrew Wheatcroft

  • ISBN: 0812972392
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Andrew Wheatcroft
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks (May 3, 2005)
  • Pages: 496
  • ePub book: 1138 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1222 kb
  • Other: docx rtf txt doc
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 601

Description

Also by andrew wheatcroft. There was something quite speci c in the meeting between Islam and Christendom that seemed to engender violence.

Also by andrew wheatcroft. The Ottomans: Dissolving Images The Habsburgs: Embodying Empire The World Atlas of Revolutions The Road to War (with Richard Overy) Zones of Conflict: An Atlas of Future Wars (with John Keegan) Who’s Who in Military History: From 1453 to the Present Day (with John Keegan).

Though the book can be read as a history of a number of interactions between Islam and Christianity - the initial Arab invasions, the Islamic conquest and Christian reconquest of Spain, the Crusades, and European conflicts with the Ottomans - it is really more about how and why these two cultures came to feel the way they did about each other both in the past.

A history of the conflict between Christendom and Islam. Got it. We value your privacy.

Wheatcroft, an academic teaching at the University of Stirling, weaves his lengthy narrative . The book thus covers a wide sweep of history, from the seventh century to the present.

Wheatcroft, an academic teaching at the University of Stirling, weaves his lengthy narrative around a fairly simple thread: the thesis that mutually negative perceptions and rhetoric of enmity and hate between Christianity and Islam developed early on since the Muslim conquest of the Holy lands, followed by the crusades and the Muslim occupation of most of the Iberian Peninsula. They have been revived ever since up to the contemporary Jidahist terrorists and the US war on terror, leading them into Afghanistan and Iraq

Though the book can be read as a history of a number of interactions between Islam and Christianity - the initial Arab invasions, the Islamic conquest and Christian reconquest of Spain, the Crusades, and European conflicts with the Ottomans - it is really more about how and why these two cultures came to feel the way they did about each other both in the past.

ALSO BY ANDREW WHEATCROFT The Ottomans: Dissolving Images The Habsburgs . Eric oscar wheatcroft. in love and gratitude. History is the most dangerous product ever concocted by the chemistry of the intellect.

ALSO BY ANDREW WHEATCROFT The Ottomans: Dissolving Images The Habsburgs: Embodying Empire The World Atlas of Revolutions The Road to War (with Richard Overy) Zones of Conflict: A. It causes dreams, inebriates nations, saddles them with false memorie. eeps their old sores running, torments them when they are not at rest, and induces in them megalomania and the mania of persecution.

Infidels: A History of the Conflict Between Christendom and Islam. Finally, Wheatcroft tells how this fraught history led to our present maelstrom. We cannot, he argues, come to terms with today's perplexing animosities without confronting this dark past. Here is the first panoptic history of the long struggle between the Christian West and Islam.

Infidels: A History of the Conflict Between Christendom and Islam, by Andrew Wheatcroft (Penguin, £. 9). It is, in some ways, an eccentric book, the result of someone thinking unconventionally about history. In 1571, the governor of Famagusta, Marcantonio Bragadino, sued for an honourable surrender after having been besieged for four months by the Ottoman commander, Lala Mustafa. Bragadino's nose and ears were sliced off after he had watched his officers and staff being beheaded. Here, Wheatcroft would appear to be enamoured of the work of structuralists.

Here is the first panoptic history of the long struggle between the Christian West and Islam.

Here is the first panoptic history of the long struggle between the Christian West and Islam.In this dazzlingly written, acutely nuanced account, Andrew Wheatcroft tracks a deep fault line of animosity between civilizations. He begins with a stunning account of the Battle of Lepanto in 1571, then turns to the main zones of conflict: Spain, from which the descendants of the Moors were eventually expelled; the Middle East, where Crusaders and Muslims clashed for years; and the Balkans, where distant memories spurred atrocities even into the twentieth century. Throughout, Wheatcroft delves beneath stereotypes, looking incisively at how images, ideas, language, and technology (from the printing press to the Internet), as well as politics, religion, and conquest, have allowed each side to demonize the other, revive old grievances, and fuel across centuries a seemingly unquenchable enmity. Finally, Wheatcroft tells how this fraught history led to our present maelstrom. We cannot, he argues, come to terms with today’s perplexing animosities without confronting this dark past.

Comments

Unirtay Unirtay
I like the fact that it gives me a background of information to evaluate the current situation and relationships between Christianity and Islam. I can't attest to the interpretation of events, but I do want to know the events that occurred.
Ieslyaenn Ieslyaenn
It's a good book, just wish I could pronounce some of the names in the book better.
Gribandis Gribandis
In a world confronted by a paradoxical resilience in the conflict between Islam and Christianity, this book offers an interesting account of the historical contexts of the struggle between these two pre-eminent religions. A powerful source for promoting an inter-faith dialogue that can bridge the gulf that exists and usher in a new culture of human tolerance and solidarity.
adventure time adventure time
Pretty much a one-sided view.
spacebreeze spacebreeze
So often books are bogged with redundancy and boring stories to fill the pages with content, with this book, it's pure history. Sure, there are a few stories, and some boring, but the history, the in-depth observation of battles and wars was astonishing. This book is a must read for those interested in the topic.
Zicelik Zicelik
very good condition
Ganthisc Ganthisc
If you who do not want to read or have any desire to understand the under lying emotions and hostility of these three religions or of this area of the world ., may I suggest that you read at least read the last chapter to Mr. Wheatcroft"s work. WORDS CAUSES EMOTIONS .EMOTIONS BRING ON FEELINGS,AND FEELINGS BRING ON ACTIONS WHICH MAY IN THESE CASES BRING ON GENERATIONS OF HOSTILITIES Mr. Wheatcroft has shown in this work that we can be control either by the words of others or by our own perceptions .May I recommend two books to read ; A DISEASE OF THE PUBLIC MIND which shows how words and certain actions will bring on dangerous outcome, when it is reinforced AGAIN by events or AGAIN words.What to know a total different cause of the WAR OF NORTHERN AGGRESSION / the WAR FOR SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCY or as BLUE BELLIES refer to it as THE CIVIL WAR or as THE WAR OF SOUTHERN REBELLION.I do not remember the author's name..John Jake's series - NORTH AND SOUTH is very interesting reading on what happens to families over a period of generations that leads to the war and after.
Andrew Wheatcroft's Infidels examines the bloody faultline between Islam and the West. The scope of his book is ambitious: he starts with a tremendous account of the battle of Lepanto in 1571, but then he forgoes the chronology. There are different sections on Andalucia, the Middle East, the Balkans and the Otto-man Empire.You get a bit about the romance of Moorish Spain and some exotic tales from the Crusades.

Andrew Wheatcroft is especially good on the key question of mutual perceptions. His knowledge of the Western representations of Islam in art and literature is impressive. Atrocities were mutual, and Wheatcroft wants to tell us why certain events were remembered better than others; he wishes to find out how we know what we know about the past. The tale is just that: one of difference and enmity and is clearly intended as the final word on the cultural history of the clash of civilizations. His attempt to short-circuit the 'maledicta', the words of pure hate at the heart of the relationship between Islam and the West, through a greater understanding of the history of mutual repulsion should be applauded.

All that said I had the impression that he wanted to cover too broad an issue in a new way. Certainly, he warns that his aim is not to explain why things happened that way, but how they happen, but in my opinion the very choice of some facts supposedly to be relevant implicitly asks for some kind of explanation that in this work is never openly developped.The final result is somehow confusing.

(Given that nowadays it is so difficult to get an objective, nuanced opinion on Islam, neither flattering nor biased against it, as a way to try and achieve that, I would suggest to read several good books on the matter, among them, the following: "The Venture of Islam", by Marshall G. S. Hodgson -nowadays a classic included in any bibliography on Islam-; "The Turks in World History" by Carter Vaughn Findley; "Muslims in the West: Redefining the Separation of Church & State" by Sami Awad Aldeeb Abu-Sahlieh; God's Rule : Government and Islam by Patricia Crone and "Understanding Jihad", by David Cook).