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eBook Witchcraft in the Middle Ages ePub

eBook Witchcraft in the Middle Ages ePub

by Jeffrey Burton Russell

  • ISBN: 0801492890
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Jeffrey Burton Russell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1st edition (August 6, 1984)
  • Pages: 414
  • ePub book: 1317 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1211 kb
  • Other: doc azw lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 787

Description

The PROBLEM of this book is, somethings Jeffrey Russell says are This book provides a nice overview of medieval . This is a well written sociological explanation of the witchcraft phenomena in Europe in the Middle Ages.

The PROBLEM of this book is, somethings Jeffrey Russell says are This book provides a nice overview of medieval heretics. It is divided into several chapters that deal with early, middle, and late phases of the Middle Ages. My focus was the High Middle Ages but I read the whole.

Jeffrey Burton Russell. This book is not about modern witchcraft. All the known theories and incidents of witchcraft in Western Europe from the fifth to the fifteenth century are brilliantly set forth in this engaging and comprehensive history. Building on a foundation of newly discovered primary sources and recent secondary interpretations, Professor Russell first establishes the facts and then explains the phenomenon of witchcraft in terms of its social and religious environment, particularly. in relation to medieval heresies. His first book was Dissent and Reform in the Early Middle Ages (1965). Witchcraft in the Middle Ages (1972). The Devil: Perceptions of Evil from Antiquity to Primitive Christianity (1977). Jeffrey Burton Russell. He is most noted for his five-volume history of the concept of the Devil: The Devil (1977), Satan (1981), Lucifer (1984), Mephistopheles (1986) and The Prince of Darkness (1988). History of Witchcraft, Sorcerers, Heretics, and Pagans (1980, 2007). Medieval Heresies: a Bibliography, 1960-1979 (with Carl T. Berkhout) (1981).

Rejecting the extremes that nobody in the Middle Ages believed in witchcraft and that "weird phenomena are not only real, but supernatural, and proof that the Devil and his minions live," Russell plots the truth along three points. 1) "At least some people were deluded into believing themselves witches. Lucifer: The Devil in the Middle Ages. com User, July 8, 2001. Satan: The Early Christian Tradition. WITCHCRAFT IN THE MIDDLE AGES by Jeffrey Russell is a salient and well-written history about religious persecution during the Middle Ages involving individuals accused of the practice of "witchcraft". WITCHCRAFT was first published in the early 1970s when a renewed interest in the craft was gaining public attention.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Witchcraft in the Middle Ages by Jeffrey . Witchcraft in the middle ages.

Witchcraft in the middle ages. Publication Date: 30 September 1984.

Russell treats European witchcraft as a product of Christianity, grounded in heresy more than in the magic and sorcery that have existed in. .A significant chapter in the history of ideas and their repression is illuminated by this book.

Russell treats European witchcraft as a product of Christianity, grounded in heresy more than in the magic and sorcery that have existed in other societies. Skillfully blending narration with analysis, he shows how social and religious changes nourished the spread of witchcraft until large portions of medieval Europe were in its grip, "from the most illiterate peasant to the most skilled philosopher or scientist. Cornell University Press, 1972 - 394 pages

Jeffrey Burton Russell. Cornell University Press, 1972 - 394 pages.

Witchcraft in the Middle (BookZZ. Uploaded by. Moises Lopez. Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America. The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer. Document Information. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln. The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers. Principles: Life and Work. Rise of ISIS: A Threat We Can't Ignore.

All the known theories and incidents of witchcraft in Western Europe from the fifth to the fifteenth century are brilliantly set forth in this engaging and comprehensive history. Building on a foundation of newly discovered primary sources and recent secondary interpretations, Jeffrey Burton Russell first establishes the facts and then explains the phenomenon of witchcraft in terms of its social and religious environment, particularly in relation to medieval heresies.

Russell treats European witchcraft as a product of Christianity, grounded in heresy more than in the magic and sorcery that have existed in other societies. Skillfully blending narration with analysis, he shows how social and religious changes nourished the spread of witchcraft until large portions of medieval Europe were in its grip, "from the most illiterate peasant to the most skilled philosopher or scientist." A significant chapter in the history of ideas and their repression is illuminated by this book. Our enduring fascination with the occult gives the author's affirmation that witchcraft arises at times and in areas afflicted with social tensions a special quality of immediacy.

Comments

Taur Taur
This book isn't exactly graduate level, but it helps if you are. And even if you're not, you'll figure it out. Simply, you should own this book. Will you refer to it every day? Not likely, but it's one of the best 'general' studies of witchcraft out there, even if it is becoming somewhat outdated. But still a fantastic "MUST OWN" reference material! And despite the fact that it is getting a little outdated, Russell is an important scholar whose ideas you should be familiar with if you're considering any major research in this field. His work is still frequently sited and offers a solid basis to which you can refer to as your own understanding of the subject progresses. Buy it, read the sections that interest you, and keep it as a resource book. I bought it out of curiosity and ended up using it for an extensive paper on witchcraft. It served me well and will continue to do.
Kata Kata
I only read 1/2 of it. I buy and read lots of books, and this is the worst book I have ever attempted to read.
Page after page of disorganized technical terms; if I already knew as much about witchcraft as the author
claims to know, perhaps it would have been worthwhile.
Uste Uste
When I purchased this book, it was because Jeffery Russell's name kept coming up in the footnotes of other material on the same subject. I found his work to be very politically correct and contradictory. For instance he states that there were no reference to paganistic Diana worship from the Roman period through the middle ages but then quotes the Roman history Livy who recorded such practices in the Roman period and then describes similar practices that occurred throughout the middle ages. So I obviously could not agree with his conclusions. He frequently used the words "witch-hunt" through out the book that made me believe he was trying to use rhetoric to program his beliefs to the reader.

The author seemed to be trying to program a point into the reader that the evidence suggested otherwise. I found it amazing that the author would so readily quote ancient sources on paganistic practices but vehemently disagree with the ancient historians opinion on what they witnessed (especially since they witnessed it).

The book did in fact further my research, and for that I am thankful. I glad to have it in my library.
Rko Rko
Thank you for your prompt service and the product is in great condition. I cannot wait to start reading it. Thank you!
Goldfury Goldfury
WITCHCRAFT IN THE MIDDLE AGES by Jeffrey Russell is a salient and well-written history about religious persecution during the Middle Ages involving individuals accused of the practice of "witchcraft". WITCHCRAFT was first published in the early 1970s when a renewed interest in the craft was gaining public attention.
Adherents of the craft have suffered a severe and enduring persecution--worse than any other religious persecution--including that of the Jews. Even today, in an era when folks pat themselves on the back for their religious "tolerence" and/or secular outlook, "witchcraft" is still largely misunderstood. Even the name is a misnomer.
Russell, who seems mostly objective, refers to the modern practice of "witchcraft" as "puerile" indicating he does not really understand the practice per se. Russell is not a participant-observer, he is an outsider examining in as objective a manner as possible events that transpired over a period of thousand years. He does not examine and order these events from the perspective of the practicioner being persecuted, he arranges them from the standpoint of the authories who now wonder what happened.
Russell says currently there are four views extant in the West concerning "witchcraft" -- mainstream Roman Catholics, Protestants and Jewish groups pretty much ignore it; Fundamentalist Judeo-Christian groups see it as a "clear and present danger" and "the work of the devil"; Liberals see it as silly or sick behaviour ignorant church people persecute and mentally deranged and confused souls practice; Ethnographers describe "witchcraft" as worldwide and real, with devoted adherents.
In the Middle Ages, the practice of "witchcraft" was associated with the diverse behaviors of various individuals or groups who for one reason or another found themselves on the wrong side of church law--first Roman Catholic and then Protestant Reformed. Russell says amazingly, individuals who participated in the Renaissance and Reformation, who overturned, destroyed, and abandoned many of the practices of the Church of Rome, retained the Catholic position on "witchcraft" and persecuted people suspected of the practice with a vengence unequaled by their predecessors.
Russell examines the roots of the Chistian attitude toward witchcraft. He says that during the Babylonian captivity, when the Jews were cruelly carried off and enslaved, they came to accept the reality of evil. Through their efforts to understand and deal with evil, they accepted it must have a creator, i.e. a source. But how can a good God be the source of evil? Enter the devil.
Russell says the dual thinking of the Jews (God and Satan--he provides many Biblical references to Satan--including the book of JOB), combined with the Greco-Roman belief in daemons (angelic entities who communicated with the gods) influenced thinking in the newly evolved Christian world. As the Church fathers grappled with folk beliefs that included Roman lares/penates and Celtic/Germanic Valkyries, fairies, elves and other supernatural folks, they came to believe Satan ruled all these magical creatures.
During the Middle Ages, individuals punished for "witchcraft" (evil practicies associated with Satan) fell into a number of different categories. Russell attempts to tease these categories apart and determine what "witchcraft" was (the concept and definition changed over time) and who exactly engaged in the practices that came to be viewed as "witchcraft" (many people of diverse interest and background did many different things--or were accused of doing these things).
Russell says for the most part, the church viewed individuals accused of "witchcraft" as heretics--i.e. engaged in non-church approved religious practices. The most famous example is the Cathars. Cathars were accused of witchcraft based on their dualistic belief in the brothers Jesus and Satan. Some non-Cathars accused of "witchcraft" were probably mentally deranged if their testimony is to be belived and the church on occasion recognized these sick souls for what they were--in writing. There were those accused of witchcraft, however, who were engaging in magical practices involving herbs, charms, illness, childbirth, and other aspects of daily living. Early records indicate these souls existed long before the church took an interest in their behavior. Much of what these practicioners believed and did was an outgrowth of their pagan beliefs. Russell says the brothers have Grimm recorded much of their belief system as "fairytales".
"Witchcraft" and its adherents came to be viewed as evil because the church could not condone magic practiced outside God's proscribed domain--and of course the church leaders determined what that domain was so this was basically a control issue. The church itself practiced magic--there is no other way to describe prayer and indulgences designed to manipulate God. The miracles of Christ and the Saints--turning water into wine, walking on water, raising the dead, expanding fishes and loaves to feed the multitude, etc. may be divine magic but are nevertheless magic.
Russell has divided his book into several chapters that deal with early, middle, and late phases of the Middle Ages. He notes that while some would define the later years as early Renaissance, he defines the Middle ages from the years following the demise of Rome's rule in Europe to the end of the 1400s when the Church in Rome lost control of Christianity in Europe.
This is an exellent book and a good place to start if you want to know more about the church's persecution of people accused of "witchcraft" during the Middle Ages. If you want to know more about "witchcraft", wicca or whatever you call the practice, I suggest DRAWING DOWN THE MOON by Margot Adler.