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eBook The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations: The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century (Culture and Religion in International Relations) ePub

eBook The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations: The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century (Culture and Religion in International Relations) ePub

by S. Thomas

  • ISBN: 1403961573
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: S. Thomas
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2005 edition (October 3, 2005)
  • Pages: 300
  • ePub book: 1161 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1337 kb
  • Other: txt mbr lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 698

Description

Post Cold War and post 9/11 politics have witnessed the global resurgence of religion, nationalism and ethnic identity and underscored the failure of international relations theory to anticipate and adequately address the role of religion and culture.

of the field and then to take a long-term strategic view of . nuclear science in the global context.

The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations: The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century (Culture and Religion in International Relations). 317 Pages · 2005 · . 9 MB · 150 Downloads ·English. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications. of the field and then to take a long-term strategic view of .

This book is about the global resurgence of culture and religion in international relations .

This book is about the global resurgence of culture and religion in international relations, and how these social changes are transforming our understanding of International Relation theory, and the key policy-related issue areas in world politics. It is evident in the on-going debates over the 'root causes' of 9/11 that there are many scholars, journalists and members of the public who still believe culture and religion can be explained away by appeals to more 'basic' economic, social or political forces in society.

The current global resurgence of religion is more wide ranging than a clash of civilizations driven by religious extremism, terrorism, or fundamentalism

The current global resurgence of religion is more wide ranging than a clash of civilizations driven by religious extremism, terrorism, or fundamentalism. This global cultural and religious shift is challenging our interpretation of the modern world-what it means to be modern-as a variety of social and religious groups struggle to find alternative paths to modernity. This The current global resurgence of religion is more wide ranging than a clash of civilizations driven by religious extremism, terrorism, or fundamentalism.

The current global resurgence of religion is more wide ranging than a clash of civilizations driven by religious .

The current global resurgence of religion is more wide ranging than a clash of civilizations driven by religious extremism, terrorism, or fundamentalism.

Three momentous events in international relations - the Iranian Revolution, the rise of Solidarity and the Polish Revolution, and the tragedy of September 11, 2001 indicate how a global resurgence of religion is transforming our understanding of international relations. Do you want to read the rest of this chapter?

The global resurgence of religion has been widely noted, and this book provides a thoughtful reflection on its implications for Western ideas about modernity and international relations

The global resurgence of religion has been widely noted, and this book provides a thoughtful reflection on its implications for Western ideas about modernity and international relations. The conventional view is that the upsurge in fundamentalism, particularly in the Middle East, reflects a stalled transition to modernity, giving militants an ideological kinship with previous antiliberal and antimodernist movements.

The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century (Culture and Religion in. .

The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century (Culture and Religion in International Relations). Published January 13, 2005 by Palgrave Macmillan. Religion and international affairs. The concept of religion was invented as part of the political mythology of liberalism and now has emerged as a universal concept applicable to other cultures and civilizations.

Religion in International Relations: The Return from Exile. 2003 - Palgrave Macmillan - London. The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations: The Struggle for the Soul of the Twenty-First Century. In-text: (Petito, 2003). Your Bibliography: Petito, F. (2003). Religion in International Relations: The Return from Exile. London: Palgrave Macmillan. 2005 - Palgrave Macmillan - London. In-text: (Thomas, 2005). Your Bibliography: Thomas, S. (2005).

This book is about the global resurgence of culture and religion in international relations, and how these social changes are transforming our understanding of International Relation theory, and the key policy-related issue areas in world politics. It is evident in the on-going debates over the 'root causes' of 9/11 that there are many scholars, journalists and members of the public who still believe culture and religion can be explained away by appeals to more 'basic' economic, social or political forces in society. Therefore The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations presents an argument for taking culture - and particularly religion - as social forces that are important for understanding world politics in the post-Westphalian era.

Comments

Gorisar Gorisar
"The Global Resurgence of Religion and the Transformation of International Relations" not only counts the global resurgence of faith to be authentic but also counts it as integral to public life. Instead of buying into a whole-sale rejection of faith, this book suggests that we need to rethink religion on the basis of the empirical evidence presented to us in globalization. This question actually challenges a great deal of liberal theories of religion that would have us believe the faith is something that stops-up the political process rather than promotes it. I think that Thomas's insight into how religion has offered transnational identities to those marginalized peoples of the world is important and begs for more attention. In response to the first review given of this book I would also add that 'faith identities' are far from static, but are living traditions in which people participate and transform. It is not as though faith only transforms politics but politics has also transformed faith--they inform each other. This view would suggest that the influence of faith in global politics might open up new areas of conversation and promote better relationships, relationships that are built on respect for each other's faith/political situation. I highly doubt that this is an unpromising investigation!
Silly Dog Silly Dog
I am going to take a liberty in this review that is only justified in the absense of any other reviews yet posted; I admit, I have not read the book. But - having taken a series of Scott's courses and read many of his articles I am fairly confident that the content will conform to his long standing positions on the issue of religion in IR, which he has been teaching for years.

The first most obvious point is that Scott believes that the 'global resurgence of religion' is not merely a postmodern political phenomena in the wake of dwindling Third World nationalism and ruthless right wing american politiking, but a genuine revival in faith across the theological spectrum. Epistemological issues aside, and this contention particularly raises many, what are the ethical implications of a subjective as well as objective political manifestation of belief? Scott seeks guidance and puts faith, quite literally in faith, to guide us out of war and conflict in the twenty first century.

The idea, however, of intercultural faith based discourse is on shaky ground. Like Huntington he shares essentialised notions of national and religious cultures, that are temporally static and proceed from a starting point of mutual exclusivity. Using eisenstadt's notion of multiple modernities he clarifies how this process can lead to multiply differentiated modern states conforming to different standards around various religious practices. The ontological question of modernity's relationship to faith is never raised and subsumed by the rhetorical gesture of 'multiple modernities' that seeks to locate modernity merely in the institutional apparatus of technology, commerce and consumerism and not within the life-world of the individual. Clarity requires confronting that pesky epistemological issue so studiously avoided.

On top of this we have to wonder in the realist mode whether a blanket idea of faith based ethics is of any utility in complicated governance problems and in war and peace. Scott's enthusiastic support for the war in Iraq, and the vacuous arguments fielded in favour of it, probably wont make its way into this book, but they thoroughly cast a doubt over the whole idea of a regressive return to theologically guided decision making and its implications for phrophetically realising 'The Clash of Civilisations.'

I give this book 3 stars firstly out of my ignorance to its exact textual context, and secondly because knowing his work and ideas Im sure it is at least a well written forray into, in my opinion, an unprofitable avenue of research. But an avenue that is probably significant for anyone requiring understanding of the internal dialectics (between left and right) of the religious contingent of IR theory.