cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Havasupai Legends: Religion and Mythology of the Havasupai Indians of the Grand Canyon
eBook Havasupai Legends: Religion and Mythology of the Havasupai Indians of the Grand Canyon ePub

eBook Havasupai Legends: Religion and Mythology of the Havasupai Indians of the Grand Canyon ePub

by Robert C Euler,Carma Lee Smithson

  • ISBN: 0874804469
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Robert C Euler,Carma Lee Smithson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Utah Press; 1st edition (January 9, 2002)
  • Pages: 152
  • ePub book: 1223 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1226 kb
  • Other: mobi lit txt azw
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 712

Description

I did not appreciate the legends portion of the book.

At her request, Robert Euler arranged and expanded her work for publication. I did not appreciate the legends portion of the book. Maybe it was the limited information provided by the shaman or the story-passer-on-ers, but to me it seemed to be a mixture of altered story telling-almost like a rumor mill where info is somewhat skewed as it is passed along.

Havasupai Legends book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Havasupai Legends book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Havasupai Legends: Religion and Mythology of the Havasupai Indians of the Grand Canyon as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Havasupai religion and mythology. Publication, Distribution, et. Salt Lake City. University of Utah Press, (c)1994. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners

Havasupai religion and mythology. Physical Description: xii, 123 . p. of plates : ill. ;, 23 cm. General Note: Originally published: Havasupai religion and mythology. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Havasupai legends : religion and mythology of the Havasupai Indians of the Grand Canyon, Carma Lee Smithson and Robert C. Euler.

By Robert C Euler, Carma Lee Smithson. For almost seven hundred years, the Havasupai Indians, who call themselves People of the Blue Water, have lived in an area that includes the depths of the western Grand Canyon and the heights of the San Francisco Peaks

By Robert C Euler, Carma Lee Smithson. For almost seven hundred years, the Havasupai Indians, who call themselves People of the Blue Water, have lived in an area that includes the depths of the western Grand Canyon and the heights of the San Francisco Peaks. Here they inhabited the greatest altitude variation of any Indians in Southwestern America. Written in consultation with some of the last Havasupai shamans, this book details their religious beliefs, customs, and healing practices.

Havasupai Legends : Religion and Mythology of the Havasupai Indians of the Grand Canyon. by Robert C. Euler and Carma Lee Smithson. by Carma Lee Smithson, Robertc Euler. Coauthors & Alternates.

Euler, Robert . EBSCO Publishing (Firm). Creation myths and legends of the Creek Indians by: Grantham, Bill. Format: Government Document eBook. The sacred oral tradition of the Havasupai as retold by elders and headmen Manakaja and Sinyella 1918-1921, Published: (2010). Traditions of the Caddo by: Dorsey, George A. 1868-1931. Old man coyote (Crow) by: Linderman, Frank Bird, 1869-1938.

Author: Carma Lee Smithson Robert C Euler. A second section presents legends of the Havasupai origin, the first people, and tales of Coyote, Gila Monster, Bear, and others.

For almost seven hundred years, the Havasupai Indians, who call themselves People of the Blue Water, have lived in an area that includes the depths of the western Grand Canyon and the heights of the San Francisco Peaks. Here they inhabited the greatest altitude variation of any Indians in Southwestern America.Written in consultation with some of the last Havasupai shamans, this book details their religious beliefs, customs, and healing practices. A second section presents legends of the Havasupai origin, the first people, and tales of Coyote, Gila Monster, Bear, and others.

Comments

Dakora Dakora
Did not enjoy this book. Poorly written. Did not finish reading it. If you want to learn about the Havasupai people, get the book, "I am the Grand Canyon".
Adorardana Adorardana
Good lore
Ghordana Ghordana
If you've read the classics, such as " Black Elk Speaks" & Carlos Castaneda's works , then you should enjoys this too.
Morad Morad
For the limited amount of information that the authors obtained, this was a fair compilation of Havasupai legends. I sure wish there were other resources that could have helped confirm what they described. Maybe someone else has more information, and I hope Mr. Euler can publish an update. The first few sections of the book were very informative, especially the funeral arrangements of Mexican Jack by his family. It really illuminated me about how very practical funerals were conducted, although I was surprised to find out that he wasn't cremated like many tribal members before him. I did not appreciate the legends portion of the book. Maybe it was the limited information provided by the shaman or the story-passer-on-ers, but to me it seemed to be a mixture of altered story telling--almost like a rumor mill where info is somewhat skewed as it is passed along. For one thing the mention of female sexual practices was contrived--almost artificially inserted--for entertainment. I sensed that the legend passers were male and that their frustrations or fixations (whichever the case) with female genitalia helped spice up the legends. The authors description of these incidental sexual acts were extrapolated from an earlier author from 1929 which may or may not be accurate. So I took the descriptions of these legends with a grain of salt. But like many other myths--they are based on fact. So I would love to read about an updated or more comprehensive sequel to this book.