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eBook Judging Jehovah's Witnesses: Religious Persecution and the Dawn of the Rights Revolution ePub

eBook Judging Jehovah's Witnesses: Religious Persecution and the Dawn of the Rights Revolution ePub

by Shawn Francis Peters

  • ISBN: 0700610081
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Shawn Francis Peters
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas; First Edition edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 342
  • ePub book: 1911 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1937 kb
  • Other: lit mobi mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 962

Description

Author Shawn Francis Peters recounts the persecution of a small, harmless, almost universally disliked group of Christians during the 1930's and 40's, when hyperpatriotism and war hysteria caused average Americans to persecute.

Author Shawn Francis Peters recounts the persecution of a small, harmless, almost universally disliked group of Christians during the 1930's and 40's, when hyperpatriotism and war hysteria caused average Americans to persecute Jehovah's Witnesses throughout the country. The Witnesses suffered savage physical abuse, incarceration, loss of employment, homes and businesses, and expulsion from schools due to their unpopular religious beliefs and actions.

Jehovah's Witnesses - United States - History - 20th century, Persecution - United States - History - 20th century, Freedom of religion - United States . Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Jehovah's Witnesses - United States - History - 20th century, Persecution - United States - History - 20th century, Freedom of religion - United States - History - 20th century. Lawrence : University Press of Kansas. inlibrary; printdisabled; ibrary; phillipsacademy; americana. Oliver Wendell Holmes Library.

Throughout the history of Jehovah's Witnesses, their beliefs, doctrines, policies and practices have engendered controversy and opposition from governments, communities, and religious groups. Many Christian denominations consider their doctrines to be heretical, and some religious leaders have labeled Jehovah's Witnesses a cult.

This is the summary of Judging Jehovah's Witnesses: Religious Persecution and the .

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Judging Jehovahs Witnesses book. One of the worst outbreaks of religious persecution in . history occurred during World War II when Jehovah's Witnesses were intimidated, beaten, and even imprisoned for refusing to salute the flag or serve in the armed forces. Determined to claim their First Am While millions of Americans were defending liberty against the Nazis, liberty was under vicious attack at home.

Judging Jehovah's Witnesses : Religious Persecution and the Dawn of the Rights Revolution

Judging Jehovah's Witnesses : Religious Persecution and the Dawn of the Rights Revolution. by Shawn Francis Peters. Very accurate chronology of the Supreme Court cases that not only spotlighted a religious group, that could have destroyed them; however, the court's visible determination to protect the Constitution turned the situation around to protect freedom of speech and religion for everyone. com User, October 2, 2003. As a history major and a Jehovah Witness I ound this book to be absolutely amazing.

Dericquebourg, R. (2003). Shawn Francis Peters, Judging Jehovah's Witnesses. Religious Persecution and The Dawn of the Rights Revolution: Lawrence, Kansas, The University Press of Kansas, 2000, p. (bibliogr. index, illustr Archives de sciences sociales des religions, no 122,(2), 46-46.

Citation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.

Judging Jehovah's Witnesses: Religious Persecution and the Dawn of the Rights Revolution. Citation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database. en.  Данный элемент включен в следующие коллекции.

Judging Jehovah's Witnesses tells how persecution-much of it directed by members of patriotic organizations like the American Legion-touched the lives of Witnesses of all ages; why the Justice Department and state officials ignored the Witnesses' pleas for relief; and how the ACLU.

Judging Jehovah's Witnesses tells how persecution-much of it directed by members of patriotic organizations like the American Legion-touched the lives of Witnesses of all ages; why the Justice Department and state officials ignored the Witnesses' pleas for relief; and how the ACLU and liberal clergymen finally stepped forward to help them

One of the worst outbreaks of religious persecution in . Peters begins with the story of William Gobitas, a Jehovah's Witness whose children refused to salute the flag at school.

Religious Persecution and the Dawn of the Rights Revolution. Determined to claim their First Amendment rights, Jehovah's Witnesses waged a tenacious legal campaign that led to twenty-three Supreme Court rulings between 1938 and 1946.

Peters (journalism and mass communication, U. of Wisconsin- Madison) depicts how the multiple attacks on Jehovah's Witnesses during the 1930s and 40s (for their unwillingness to salute the flag or enter the military) and the Witnesses' resultant responses in the courts, provided a necessary precursor to the American civil rights movement. He explores the roles of the ACLU and many individual Witnesses to illustrate the politics and personalities behind their efforts to gain 1st Amendment freedoms. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Comments

Agantrius Agantrius
Powerful history of a dark and disturbing, yet little remembered, incident of religious intolerance in America's not-too-distant past. Author Shawn Francis Peters recounts the persecution of a small, harmless, almost universally disliked group of Christians during the 1930's and 40's, when hyperpatriotism and war hysteria caused average Americans to persecute Jehovah's Witnesses throughout the country. The Witnesses suffered savage physical abuse, incarceration, loss of employment, homes and businesses, and expulsion from schools due to their unpopular religious beliefs and actions.

This is a scholarly, yet highly readable account of the persecution and the groundbreaking reaction of the Witnesses as they and their allies, chiefly the ACLU, battled the injustices heaped upon them by fighting back in the courts, with many of their cases reaching the Supreme Court.

Not a Witness, Peters brings an unbiased eye to the subject. While not necessarily agreeing with their doctrines or aggressive proselytizing activities, the author has nothing but admiration for the courage and fortitude of the Witnesses throughout their ordeals, and for the tenacity with which they fought for justice through an often hostile legal system.

The book contains hundreds of citations from an impressive array of sources, including the Witnesses' own publications, interviews of individuals who suffered from the persecution, court documents, information from ACLU archives, newspapers, magazines, and legal journals.

Peters notes that while fighting primarily to obtain relief for themselves from persecution, the Witnesses forced the Supreme Court to focus on basic human rights as guaranteed by the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution, thus benefitting future civil rights movements, and indeed, all Americans

This is a splendid book, a must-read for anyone interested in law, Constitutional history, the Supreme Court, religious freedom in America, and civil rights movements.
Saimath Saimath
The author explains in the Introduction to this book, "I make no attempt to provide a comprehensive account of the Witnesses' history or their sometimes puzzling doctrines... I focus on a narrow and troubling chapter in the Witnesses' history---their persecution throughout the United States in the early and mid-1940s---and gauge its formidable impact on American law."

Here are some quotations from the book:

"Targeted largely because they refused to salute the American flag, Witnesses throughout the United States were pummeled in situations ranging from riots ... to scuffles..." (Pg. 8)
"But as one scholar has noted, the Witness cases as a group nonetheless had a 'profound impact on the evolution of constitutional law' by helping to bring minority and indivdiual rights... out of the shadows and into the forefront of constitutional jurisprudence." (Pg. 13)
"Supreme Court decisions are often criticized, and some are disobeyed, but few have ever provoked as violent a public reaction as the 'Gobitis' opinion." (Pg. 71)
"...the Court decision has served to kindle mob violence against Jehovah's Witnesses." (Pg. 84)
"Overzealous proselytizers ... sometimes broke the law, by refusing to leave private property after they had been asked to do so by a homeowner or tenant. Although the Constitution protected (JW's) rights to speak and worship freely, it did not give them license to trespass." (Pg. 117)
"What followed was an unfortunate example of the type of crisis that so often resulted from the Witness' penchant for confrontation." (Pg. 139)
"For every Witness who gained a minister's exemption or successfully challenged his draft classification in court, hundreds failed." (Pg. 277)
"Although they were still viewed by many as nuisances, Witness proselytizers began to see the wisdom of employing less aggressive tactics when they distributed literature in public... Under the stewardship of Nathan Knorr, who succeeded Joseph Rutherford as Watch Tower leader in 1942, the faith inched closer to the mainstream..." (Pg. 294)
Lahorns Gods Lahorns Gods
We owe our modern understanding of First Amendment rights to the Jehovah Witnesses, and this book does a good job describing the struggles and advancements the Witnesses made to ensure their own religious freedoms. Easy to read, anyone interested in the First Amendment and civil liberties in America should read this book.