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eBook How the Barbarian Invasions Shaped the Modern World: The Vikings, Vandals, Huns, Mongols, Goths, and Tartars who Razed the Old World and Formed the New ePub

eBook How the Barbarian Invasions Shaped the Modern World: The Vikings, Vandals, Huns, Mongols, Goths, and Tartars who Razed the Old World and Formed the New ePub

by Thomas J. Craughwell

  • ISBN: 1592333036
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Thomas J. Craughwell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Fair Winds Press (July 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1954 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1825 kb
  • Other: mobi lit lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 195

Description

Understanding these invading Barbarians helps us understand the modern world in which we live today.

All that being said, the book does have many redeeming features, particularly for a reader who knows nothing about the Barbarian invasions from Alaric's sack of Rome in 410 to the Mongols of the thirteenth century. Understanding these invading Barbarians helps us understand the modern world in which we live today. If you are looking for a great overview, this is the book. Great illustrations, maps, and timelines are included.

Illustrated with more than 100 archival images gathered from around the world.

In this highly readable and authoritative book, author Thomas J. Craughwell. Illustrated with more than 100 archival images gathered from around the world. 2 people like this topic

This richly detailed chronicle. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

This richly detailed chronicle. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking How the Barbarian Invasions Shaped the Modern World: The Vikings, Vandals, Huns, Mongols, Goths, and Tartars who Razed the Old World and Formed the New as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Shaped the modern world. Thomas j. Of all the barbarian kings and barbarian nations, Attila and his Huns are the most famous, yet aside from their fame as cruel marauders they have left little perceivable trace upon the modern world. Genghis Khan, on the other hand, knew exactly what he wanted for his Mongolshe wanted to build nations, he wanted his people to acquire the technological and artistic skills the Chinese possessed.

Thomas J Craughwell ; illustrated by Marie Coons. Man's story; world history in its geographic setting Explore. Find in other libraries. Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive

Illustrated with more than 100 archival images gathered from around the world.

Author: Thomas J. The Vikings (World History). Craughwell draws upon the latest historical and .

How the Barbarian Invasions Shaped the Modern World: The Vikings, Vandals, Huns, Mongols, Goths, and Tartars Who Razed the Old World and Formed the New" is a look at the barbarians responsible for how the world is today

How the Barbarian Invasions Shaped the Modern World: The Vikings, Vandals, Huns, Mongols, Goths, and Tartars Who Razed the Old World and Formed the New" is a look at the barbarians responsible for how the world is today. With examinations of the lives and actions of such brutal individuals such as Attila the Hun, Genghis Khan, and others, "How the Barbarian Invasions Shaped the Modern World" describes barbarians' nasty crusade against the civilized world and how their influence is still prevalent even today.

This richly detailed chronicle brings to life the personalities of Attila the Hun, Alaric the Goth, Genghis Khan, and many other barbarian kings and chieftains whose rampages across Europe, Asia, and North Africa changed the course of history.

In this highly readable and authoritative book, author Thomas J. Craughwell draws upon the latest historical and archaeological research to reveal the impact of the barbarian invasions on the modern world: from the establishment of the English language, to the foundation of world capitals such as Dublin, to the introduction of gunpowder to Europe. Illustrated with more than 100 archival images gathered from around the world.

Comments

Pameala Pameala
This is an attractive, well produced book evidently aimed at junior high school readers, with many, many fancy illustrations from classical and modern artists, good and relatively accurate reference maps, double-spaced type, and many, many vignettes like those in textbooks to hold the reader's interest. The prose is ninth grade, and there are zero (nada, zip) footnotes and end notes -- yet the author makes sweeping opinion statements throughout as if they are fact. As an example, the author states on page 60, "Their (the Romans) commander was the Roman's finest military strategist, Flavius Aetius." Wow, and here I thought that Julius Caesar, Scipio Africanus, Lucullus, Trajan, Marcus Aurelius or Constantine might have been in the running for this accolade. I think the author meant to add "at the time" but it's not there. The author also says, "No one knows what became of the Huns." Well, there are several good studies of the Huns, but for whatever reason the author chose to fire for effect rather than present solid scholarship. This is probably all junior high school students can handle anyway, but anyone reading this as an historical treatise will be disappointed.

My copy of the book is officially softbound (& produced in Singapore), but had a very stiff cover with fold-out ends to display Thomas Cole's "The Course of Empire -- Destruction", his depiction of the Vandal sack of Rome. Of course the author goes to great lengths to discuss that the Vandals did not actually vandalize Rome -- as it that made any difference. There are many other short descriptions that leave much to be desired -- for example the Battle of Liegnitz. Where did the burning naphtha come from? What were the Mongol tactics? Oh well, it was enough to say the Mongols collected nine sacks of right ears cut off from those slain.

All that being said, the book does have many redeeming features, particularly for a reader who knows nothing about the Barbarian invasions from Alaric's sack of Rome in 410 to the Mongols of the thirteenth century. The author skips over the earlier invasions that Rome contended with throughout its existence (the Gauls sacked Rome in 390 BC and the Marcomanni in 178 were a dangerous threat handled by Marcus Aurlius) which should have been covered since they substantially affected Roman history. The coverage by the author does impart a modicum of knowledge, however, mostly a broad understanding of events and their effects.

If nothing else, this book is a good primer to popularize the study of barbarian invasions, including the effects of the Vikings on history from Northern Europe to the Mediterranean. I was particularly impressed that the author had included the Kievan Rus, Olga, (one of history's most successful warrior queens), and the eventual spread of Christianity in Russia in opposition to the Jewish Khazars (although the author forgets to mention that they were Jewish.)

All in all, I gave the book three stars for filling a niche in the literature. If this book helps promote study into its subject, then everything will be to the good. Just don't expect superior scholarship and a detail study. This book is long on glitz and short on substance.
Eta Eta
Interesting history but very repetitive. Reads/feels like a coffee table book
Malien Malien
Great read
caif caif
Thomas Craughwell is a great author who portrays history in such amazing and succinct ways that anyone could get into this book and love it. It is not only well written, it has great illustrations and, as always from Craughwell, interesting facts, including the fun, gossipy stuff e.g. how early Russians bathed or how each great barbarian leader looked or acted. This is a great gift to any budding historian, even teenagers. Craughwell is always flawless in his knowledge and research, but writes it in such great fashion that you will have great difficulty putting it down once you start it. This is a good book for anyone, it is not repulsive but yet describes the horror of the barbarian invasions of Europe. But it also shows the reasoning of these invasions and essentially shows that both the barbarians and those they invaded were both cruel people. But it also shows that in our times in many ways, we the "civilized" tend to continue to be as cruel as these barbarians once were.
Ucantia Ucantia
Fantastic book, beautiful layout, nice collection of facts, covers basics with great photos/pics too. It is pitched at good general knowledge, do not Expect a PhD thesis.Lovely layout too.
in waiting in waiting
good book
Cordabor Cordabor
If you are a historical scholar, working on your doctorate degree, I doubt this book was written for you. But if you are like me, someone who is interested in history, and wants to gain an overview knowledge of a specific period of time and events, this book is great.

As a descendant of Hungarian grandparents, I wanted to gain a better understanding of the role the Huns played in Hungary, which led me to this book. But I found that this book is so much more. While it has some great info on Attila and his foraging armies, it also covers in depth the Vikings, the Mongols (they are a lovable sort), the Tartars, etc. There were a lot of Barbarians in the first thousand years after Christ, and they were out to take all that they can, with as much force as they could muster, not caring who they hurt or destroyed. They looked to conquer through theft, pillaging, and gluttony (not unlike the CEOs looking for handouts in Washington today while they refuse to lower their own gluttonous salaries). Understanding these invading Barbarians helps us understand the modern world in which we live today.

If you are looking for a great overview, this is the book. Great illustrations, maps, and timelines are included. If you are looking for a stocking stuffer for that barbarian that you love...this book is highly recommended.
My first gripe is with the author's failure to address his chosen subject, the issues the title deals with. There is usually one short paragraph at the end of each chapter that makes some conclusive remarks, but never addresses the issue, the lasting impact of barbarian invasions. Even a simple 'the Vikings united the kingdoms of Britain THUS FORGING THE BRITISH STATE' would suffice. The concept of the book was fascinating, so this makes the disappointment worse.

With this dealt with, perhaps I could have settled with the book being simply an introduction to some key military events. Not so, because the author never really informs as to the significance of each battle. He just describes it. These issues are inferred, which leads to questions like 'so what?'

So, what is left? Anecdotes. Cute, coffee-table anecdotes. The author, however, only very rarely informs us of his sources, often these are the dubious histories of ancient chroniclers (the kind who liked to dress up their stories and figures.) Occasionally, the author acknowledges this, but not often, and there are plenty of uncited anecdotes, some of which are bizarre enough that you wonder where he lifted them from and how truthful they are.

This book doesn't even work as an introduction. It says nothing of much interest and not much I felt believable.