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eBook Comparative Criminal Justice: Making Sense Of Difference (Compact Criminology) ePub

eBook Comparative Criminal Justice: Making Sense Of Difference (Compact Criminology) ePub

by David Nelken

  • ISBN: 1847879373
  • Category: Criminal Law
  • Subcategory: Law
  • Author: David Nelken
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd; 1 edition (May 26, 2010)
  • Pages: 128
  • ePub book: 1468 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1891 kb
  • Other: txt lrf mbr doc
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 907

Description

Comparative Criminal Justice provides a challenging perspective on comparative criminological enquiry

Comparative Criminal Justice provides a challenging perspective on comparative criminological enquiry. Being able to question ones-self and becoming aware of one′s own culturally shaped starting points - which at first glance appears self-evident - has not yet succeeded in gaining the status.

Addressing the need for a globalized criminology, David Nelken looks at why we should study crime and criminal. The increasingly important topic of comparative criminal justice is examined from an original and insightful perspective by one of the top scholars in the field. Addressing the need for a globalized criminology, David Nelken looks at why we should study crime and criminal justice in a comparative and international context, and the difficulties we encounter when we do. Evaluating ‘global’ trends in crime, risk and security, the book draws upon the author’s experience of working in a number of settings around the world.

Downes, David (2010) ‘Comparative criminology, globalisation and the punitive turn ’, in DavidNelken (e., Comparative Criminal Justice and Globalisation.

Compact Criminology: Comparative criminal justice: Making sense of difference London: SAGE Publications Ltd doi: 1. 135/9781446251546. Comparative Criminal Justice: Making Sense of Difference. London: SAGE Publications Ltd, 2010. doi: 1. Downes, David (2010) ‘Comparative criminology, globalisation and the punitive turn ’, in DavidNelken (e. Downes, David and Van Swaaningen, Renee (2007) ‘The road to dystopia?

At a first look, Comparative Criminal Justice by David Nelken is a slim book, just as required by the format of Sage’s Compact Criminology series. However, the reader expecting an easy synthesis of the subject could not be more mistaken

At a first look, Comparative Criminal Justice by David Nelken is a slim book, just as required by the format of Sage’s Compact Criminology series. However, the reader expecting an easy synthesis of the subject could not be more mistaken. Even the author, who calls his work an introduction to the field (p. 9), is maybe too modest about its value. The book is an extremely learned discussion of the goals, the assumptions, the implications and the methods of comparing criminal justice systems.

Comparative Criminal Justice book. Start by marking Comparative Criminal Justice: Making Sense of Difference (Compact Criminology) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. David Nelken is the 2013 laureate of the Association for Law.

Addressing the need for a globalized criminology, David Nelken looks at why we should study crime and criminal justice in a comparative and international context, and the difficulties we encounter when we do. Evaluating 'global' trends in crime, risk and security, the book draws upon the author's experience of working in a number of settings around the world. A range of case studies are included to illustrate the discussion, covering areas such as white collar crime, juvenile delinquency, and organized crime. Comparative Criminal Justice.

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oceedings{eCJ, title {Comparative Criminal Justice: Making Sense of Difference}, author . Changing Paradigms Why Compare? Just Comparison Ways of Making Sense Explaining too Much?

oceedings{eCJ, title {Comparative Criminal Justice: Making Sense of Difference}, author {David Nelken}, year {2010} }. David Nelken. Changing Paradigms Why Compare? Just Comparison Ways of Making Sense Explaining too Much? The Challenge of the Global Whose Sense? Save to Library.

Comparative Criminal Justice: Making Sense of Difference. Los Angeles: Sage, 2010. Published: 8 December 2011.

Comparative criminal justice is a subfield of the study of Criminal justice that compares justice systems worldwide. Such study can take a descriptive, historical, or political approach. It studies the similarities and differences in structure, goals, punishment and emphasis on rights as well as the history and political stature of different systems. It is common to broadly categorize the functions of a criminal justice system into policing, adjudication (.

The increasingly important topic of comparative criminal justice is examined from an original and insightful perspective by one of the top scholars in the field. Addressing the need for a globalized criminology, David Nelken looks at why we should study crime and criminal justice in a comparative and international context, and the difficulties we encounter when we do. Evaluating ′global′ trends in crime, risk and security, the book draws upon the author′s experience of working in a number of settings around the world. A range of case studies are included to illustrate the discussion, covering areas such as white collar crime, juvenile delinquency, and organized crime.