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eBook The Jungle (The Oregon Files) ePub

eBook The Jungle (The Oregon Files) ePub

by Jack Du Brul,Clive Cussler

  • ISBN: 0399157042
  • Category: Action and Adventure
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jack Du Brul,Clive Cussler
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons; 1 edition (March 8, 2011)
  • Pages: 406
  • ePub book: 1697 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1530 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi azw doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 435

Description

Clive Cussler's tales of the Oregon and its crew-"the clever, indefatigable Juan Cabrillo and his merry band of tough, tech-savvy fighting men and women" (Publishers Weekly)-have made fans of hundreds of thousands of readers.

Clive Cussler's tales of the Oregon and its crew-"the clever, indefatigable Juan Cabrillo and his merry band of tough, tech-savvy fighting men and women" (Publishers Weekly)-have made fans of hundreds of thousands of readers. But the Oregon's sixth adventure is its most remarkable one yet. On December 7, 1941, five brothers exploring a shaft on a small island off the coast of Washington State make an extraordinary discovery, only to be interrupted by news of Pearl Harbor.

The number-one bestseller Clive Cussler, author of the thrilling Dirk Pitt novels Treasure of Khan andTrojan Odyssey, and co-author Jack Du Brul tell a gripping story of adventure, treachery and betrayal in the eighth Oregon.

The number-one bestseller Clive Cussler, author of the thrilling Dirk Pitt novels Treasure of Khan andTrojan Odyssey, and co-author Jack Du Brul tell a gripping story of adventure, treachery and betrayal in the eighth Oregon Files novel. Juan Cabrillo faces a global deadly threat in Clive Cussler's The Jungle. Juan Cabrillo and the crew of the Oregon are up against their smartest foe yet - but in their midst there is a traitor. After losing their contract with the US government because of a daring raid too far, Cabrillo and his crew of mercenaries with a conscience are earning money the hard way: doing dirty, dangerous little jobs in the world's trouble spots.

Clive Cussler is the author of more than fifty books in five bestselling series, including Dirk Pitt, NUMA Files .

Clive Cussler is the author of more than fifty books in five bestselling series, including Dirk Pitt, NUMA Files, Oregon Files, Isaac Bell, and Fargo. His life nearly parallels that of his hero Dirk Pitt. Jack Du Brul is the author of the Philip Mercer series, most recently Havoc, and is the coauthor with Cussler of the Oregon Files novels Dark Watch, Skeleton Coast, Plague Ship, and Corsair. From Publishers Weekly: Juan Cabrillo and his crew of mercenaries engage in one daring rescue operation after another with progressively higher stakes in Cussler's high-octane eighth Oregon Files novel (after The Silent Sea), his sixth collaboration with Du Brul. His life nearly parallels that of his hero Dirk Pitt

Clive Cussler is the author of more than fifty books in five bestselling series, including Dirk Pitt, NUMA Files, Oregon Files, Isaac Bell, and Fargo. His life nearly parallels that of his hero Dirk Pitt His collection features more than eighty examples of custom coachwork. Cussler lives in Arizona and Colorado. Series: The Oregon Files (Book 8). Paperback: 496 pages.

Clive Cussler and his co-writer Jack Du Brul do a great job ensuring that I am involved with the story and the characters

The Jungle by Clive Cussler is another fast-paced thriller that I thoroughly enjoyed. I haven’t read a Cussler in awhile (I think I overdosed some years ago!!) but I know why I love his work. Clive Cussler and his co-writer Jack Du Brul do a great job ensuring that I am involved with the story and the characters. I loved the way Clive Cussler and Jack De Brul put the twists and turn into the plot of The Jungle and the fantastic way they combine everything at the end of the book.

Clive Cussler (Author) Clive Cussler is the author or co-author of a great number of international bestsellers . Adventures which lastly included The Solomon Curse.

Clive Cussler (Author) Clive Cussler is the author or co-author of a great number of international bestsellers, including the famous Dirk Pitt (R) adventures, such as Havana Storm; the NUMA (R) Files adventures, most recently The Pharaoh's Secret; the Oregon Files, such as The Emperor's Revenge; the Isaac Bell historical thrillers, which began with The Chase; and the recent Fargo.

Oregon files adventures by clive cussler. The Silent Sea. Corsair. 1. Cabrillo, Juan (Fictitious character)-Fiction. 2. Mercenary troops-Fiction. I. Du Brul, Jack B. II. Title. This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the authors’ imagination or are used fictitiously, and any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, businesses, companies, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.

Recently, Du Brul has co-authored "The Oregon Files" novels with Clive Cussler, taking over from Craig Dirgo . Du Brul sometimes incorporates right-wing themes into his novels.

Recently, Du Brul has co-authored "The Oregon Files" novels with Clive Cussler, taking over from Craig Dirgo with the third novel. The latest novel, Mirage, was a New York Times bestseller. As of 2015, Jack Du Brul is no longer the co-author of The Oregon Files with Clive Cussler. Du Brul sometimes incorporates right-wing themes into his novels

The Jungle (The Oregon Files)' by Clive Cussler and Jack Du Brul -- Clive Cussler's tales of the Oregon and its crew have made fans of hundreds of thousands of readers. And in this latest adventure, a. Clive Cussler- the old Dirk Pitt novels or the newer ones from the Oregon files.

The Jungle (The Oregon Files)' by Clive Cussler and Jack Du Brul -- Clive Cussler's tales of the Oregon and its crew have made fans of hundreds of thousands of readers. The Oregon Files: One of so many great Books (on CD) by Clive Cussler I listen to while driving. Best part, they are free from the library

Clive Cussler's fifth Oregon Files novel, Plague Ship, pits Juan Cabrillo against a deadly adversary. In a Norwegian glacier during World War Two a Nazi officer makes an extraordinary discovery - the most legendary ship of all time.

Clive Cussler's fifth Oregon Files novel, Plague Ship, pits Juan Cabrillo against a deadly adversary. Sixty years later Juan Cabrillo and the crew of the Oregon - a top secret state of the art military vessel disguised as a heap of junk - reap the terrible rewards of this find. In the Persian Gulf they encounter a cruise ship full of the dead and the dying. While attempting a rescue, the stricken liner erupts into a fireball

Jungles come in many forms. There are the steamy rain forests of the Burmese highlands. There are the lies and betrayals of the world of covert operations. And there are the dark and twisted thoughts of a man bent on near-global domination. To pull off their latest mission, Juan Cabrillo and the crew of the Oregon must survive them all. A devastating new weapon unleashed in thirteenth-century China...a daring rescue in the snowbound mountains along the Afghanistan/Pakistan border...a woman gone missing in the jungles of northern Thailand and Myanmar...for Cabrillo and his crew, all of these events will come together-leading to the greatest threat against U.S. security that the world has ever known.

Comments

Wymefw Wymefw
The book narrates a rather depressing tale. Immigrants have a hard time to hoe just coming here. They also have swindlers and other challenges. I can understand that I can only imagine how such a life would feel.

The story takes you on a realistic narrative which visits the various pitfalls and snares for vulnerable populations. I would suppose with our current regime in charge, works of literature which speak for the plight of the immigrant might not be as popular.

This said, you can probably stop reading at the end when the exposition begins on socialism. Nothing of further note really happens to Jurgis. It seems that this last chapter would best serve as a warning to would be authors regarding where to stop.
Ceck Ceck
The unbelievable suffering of Jurgis and his family was about as depressing as anything I have ever read. The condition of the immigrants was inhuman times 1,000. And the packing houses and the lack of regulations to prevent such horrific practices was shocking. Where Sinclair lost me was when the book turned into a one sided socialist tract that ignored the positive things associated with capitalism and democracy. IMO, history has proven him wrong.
Snowseeker Snowseeker
Sinclair successfully connects his readers emotionally to the characters, and you can't help but feel personally tied to the endlessly miserable lives that the early 20th century European immigrants endured in Chicago. The entire novel is seen through the eyes of a young Lithuanian man, and the obstacles and tragedies that befall him rise to the point where as the reader, you find yourself thinking that it would have been better if he had never come to America at all. To add insult to injury, he finds work in Chicago's meat-packing industry just like thousands of other immigrants. The conditions are absolutely DISGUSTING (seriously, do not consume food while reading) for the animals, the people who work there, and the people who eat the food.

In fact, this novel sparked investigation into the industry that changed national health regulations. The scary part is that nearly everything Sinclair described was found to be TRUE. The only thing that wasn't proven was whether or not the bodies of workers who fell to their deaths ended up in the finished meat products. However, the inspectors also weren't able to definitively report to President Roosevelt that it didn't happen.

Much to Sinclair's dismay, the book attracted attention primarily to the conditions in the meat-packing industry. His intention, however, was to raise awareness to the immigrant's plight in America. After seeing the public reception of the book, Sinclair said, "I aimed at the public's heart, and by accident I hit it in the stomach."

The protagonist's story continues far after his stint in meat-packing ends, but many people's attention span did not.

It's not a pleasant piece of literature, but it's hard to put down and is very eye-opening on many levels.
Tyler Is Not Here Tyler Is Not Here
Fifty years later and I re-read this book. I had to read this in high school, but I wasn't mature or studious enough to understand the significance, even though my grandparents were all immigrants. The world of slaughterhouses hasn't changed much in the past 100 years, poverty, and children working to support their family. Both of my parents had to quit school to support their families or starve. You knnw the old expression "what goes around, comes around?" Those days look like they are coming around again.
Simple fellow Simple fellow
Upton Sinclair had hoped to accomplish much with this novel. He hoped that Americans might understand how badly treated the American worker was.
What they understood was that the meat packing industry was selling potentially deadly meat to American consumers. Sinclair's accounts of the filth, the rats and the deception regarding meat packing are powerful. The idea that any piece of meat can be made to look fresh and appealing no matter how rotten and decayed it might be is an unsettling one.
What Sinclair hoped to stir up was outrage that the workers were no better treated than the meat. The story centers around Jurgis, a Lithuanian who moves with his father, his fiancee and several members of his extended family to America.
The family is preyed upon by everyone. They are sold a "new" house only to learn that the house is far from new and shoddily made The agent who sells them the house does not explain interest, insurance or sewer costs and so the family lives from month to month worried that they cannot make payments
Working and living conditions keep members ill or injured most of the time. Jugis' wife ends up sleeping with her boss in order to retain her job and Jurgis ends up in jail when he confronts the man. He does not fare well with the bosses or the unions. Jurgis lives on the street man times

But Jurgis discovers socialism and ends up with some sense of hope.Sinclair does a good job of describing socialism and the novel provides a solid context for its appeal

The surprise of all this is that how much of it does not seem dated and it can still pack a punch Some years ago I got into a discussion with a man who told me his daughter had been assigned this book for a history class I proceeded to give a brief lecture on muckraking.
"So you think she should read the book, do you?"
"Yes." I said.
It turns out that this gentleman had sent a letter to his daughter's school forbidding her to read it. He didn't like the graphic detail and its portrayal of prostitution as a career alternative for impoverished women offended him
"My daughter shouldn't know about this stuff."
It's indeed unfortunate that the book is still so relevant decades after it was written.