cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » RealmShift
eBook RealmShift ePub

eBook RealmShift ePub

by Alan Baxter

  • ISBN: 1411668626
  • Category: Action and Adventure
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Alan Baxter
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Lulu.com (January 21, 2006)
  • Pages: 460
  • ePub book: 1935 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1675 kb
  • Other: azw lrf lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 334

Description

This is a Multifile Torrent. mp3 18. 7 MBs. Realm Shift Part2.

The Devil is making his job very difficult This is a Multifile Torrent.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets Alan Baxter introduces us to a mystical world, a shadowed realm with forces beyond comprehension or principle. the overall effect, more so for a first time author, is notably fine. Physical and dimensional conflict is one of the best features of the tale.

Download books for free. Download (rtf, . 2 Mb). Epub FB2 PDF mobi txt. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Shift of realm, immortals invade, dark forces. Alan Baxter introduces us to a mystical world, a shadowed realm with forces beyond comprehension or principle. Chasing rain, silvered drops.

Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases and classic fiction. Shift of realm, immortals invade, dark forces. Zig-zag, left, right, left, always down. Human tumble at the station. Mr. Baxter writes with conviction; he writes differently rather well. Some mid-sections lose their zing, pace and dialogue considerably slow but the overall effect, more so for a first time author, is notably fine.

Isiah is having a tough time. The Devil is making his job very difficult. Samuel Harrigan is a murdering lowlife  . RealmShift is an engrossing Dark Fantasy thriller; a fascinating exploration of the nature of people’s beliefs and their effect on the world around them. Magic, action and intrigue, from dank city streets to the depths of Hell and beyond. A gripping, thought-provoking tale that evokes a strong response within the reader, both on an emotional and an intellectual level.

Alan Baxter's first novel, RealmShift, is a smart, action-packed multi-genre epic: dark urban fantasy, thriller, noir . This dynamic makes the book for me. RealmShift does slow down through the middle as some of the characters have to literally waste time while the rest of the pieces get in place.

Alan Baxter's first novel, RealmShift, is a smart, action-packed multi-genre epic: dark urban fantasy, thriller, noir and horror, all rolled seamlessly together. In a world where every god and demon from every culture is exactly as real as its followers believe it to be, Isiah is an immortal enforcer for the Balance, a meta-deity that polices these strange and contrary powers. Baxter fills this with exposition about the cosmology and the way that 'magic system' works.

Alan Baxter writes dark fantasy so you know the thrills will have some dark edges, verging on horror in this great book.

tv Alan Baxter writes dark fantasy so you know the thrills will have some dark edges, verging on horror in this great book  . his sins I also like the detail of the gods and the mythology behind the realms - I am a sucker for anything to do with religion There's violence that definitely verges on horror but it's not too much, I really enjoyed this book. The sequel MageSign is definitely more gory, the blood mage scenes are quite harrowing but definitely try these books if you enjoy your thrillers a little dark and edgy.

Realm Shift is an inventive and action-packed story set in the shadow land where the supernatural and the mundane meet head o. Alan Baxter shows glimmers of unusual talent in his world building and prose style. liked the narrative drive and the interesting concept that Realm Shift is based on. I think that it would make an excellent movie – Realm Shift is definitely a hot concept property waiting to be plucked by a Hollywood creative exec. Ed Kane, POD People. fast-paced and full of vibrancy, the characters fascinating, and the plot intriguing – Maggie Pragratis, Author.

A force exists beyond all belief and knowledge. That force is the Balance. Isiah is having a tough time.

the overall effect, more so for a first time author, is notably fine.

A force exists beyond all belief and knowledge. That force is the Balance. When the supernatural and the magical shape and shift the mundane all around us and fewer people every day are concerned with matters beyond the material, the actions of individuals can drastically upset that Balance. Deep within this world a powerful immortal must lead a powerful coward in a quest against the odds to prevent a descent into chaos. From the deepest planes of Hell to the sweltering Guatemalan jungle, the actions of a few people will shape the future in this contemporary fantasy and action packed adventure thriller, set in the here and now against the overlapping backdrop of the world we know and the myriad realms beyond. (Please note - this novel contains strong language and adult themes).

Comments

Iraraeal Iraraeal
This book kept me up way too late. It was a case of "Just one more chapter, just one more chapter!"
Here's the actual conversation I had with a friend regarding it.
<Friend> so what book kept you up?
<Sandra> Alan Baxter's "Realmshift"
<Friend> is good?
<Sandra> Unfortunately, yes
<Sandra> Kept reading past midnight! Just one more chapter. Just one more chapter. Yeesh!
<Sandra> Sum up: Sam sold his soul to the devil, and figured out a way to renege
<Sandra> Another person, the main character, is trying to find him to prevent Satan or his minions from finding and killing the guy
<Sandra> Because the way to avoid paying the devil, Sam has to use blood magic on a regular basis, killing very important the 'realms' people.

Yes, it's a page turner. It is a bit reminiscent of "Dresden", but only in passing. I will say, if you like "Harry Dresden" books, you're going to like Realmshift
Kearanny Kearanny
RealmShift is a difficult story to classify. It is a well-written dark fantasy with a detailed cosmology that feeds heavily into the plot, but the characters populating the story are less important than their purposes to facilitate plot continuity, which makes me hesitate to recommend it.

The plot revolves around Isiah, an immortal tool for the Balance, which facilitates change within the world by maintaining order between good and evil. Humans unknowingly create their own realities with faith, which brings all manner of gods and religions into the cosmology who exist because of the humans who believe in them. Isiah is tasked with rescuing recently-deceased occult-practitioner Samuel Harrigan from Hell after he reneged on a deal with Satan. The Balance wants Samuel to complete a trip he had planned to Guatemala (for purposes of acquiring a crystal skull) so that Samuel can kill mercenary-sociopath Carlos Villalopez, who in turn would have murdered American eco-journalist Katherine Bailey, whose presence will convince a tribe to receive inoculations and prevent the death of a god when the tribe dies out. (This isn't a spoiler, as the Balance tells all of this to Isiah within the first couple of chapters.)

I prefer character-driven stories. This is primarily why I found the characters in this novel--with the exception of Isiah--to be predictable and somewhat monotonous. The story shifts point-of-view between Isiah, Katherine, and Carlos as they all travel separately for different purposes to Guatemala where they will eventually intersect. Isiah is the most well-developed "gray" character who is neither good nor evil. Katherine represents the "good" journalist with noble intentions while Carlos is the "evil" mercenary out to kill/rape/torture anyone he comes across, and after the first few chapters in their p-of-v, I found myself becoming impatient to get back to the chapters featuring Isiah. The chapters of Katherine and Carlos were well-written and descriptive; I just found myself growing bored with these human caricatures. There's only so much murder and mayhem you can read before it all runs together. Likewise, I found myself wanting to roll my eyes after a few chapters of Katherine's good will toward men ideals.

The tone of the omniscient narrator is extremely distant and unemotional, almost as if the events are being relayed by a bored entity. I can see where this might have been deliberate on the author's part, but this style made it very difficult for me to become invested in the story, and easy to set the book down and pick back up as opposed to reading straight through.

The pacing was noticeably faster during the chapters featuring Isiah, as those are the only ones containing fantastical elements (fight scenes with Satan and his minions, dealing with archangel Gabriel and a group of vampires); particularly engrossing was the scene when Isiah journeys into Hell to steal Samuel's soul from the devil. Carlos and Katherine chapters are mired in reality. I honestly think this story could have benefitted from cutting some of the chapters focusing on those two characters as they don't seem to serve any purpose other than representations of opposing forces. Had the novel focused solely on Isiah's journey with Samuel--a wretched human being who Isiah is forced to protect from Satan--I probably would have enjoyed it much more. One irritation I had was the manner in which Isiah dealt with Samuel: a murdering scum who kills two people right in front of Isiah during their mad rush to escape the devil. Isiah kept threatening Samuel with dire consequences but never followed through when Samuel called his bluff. As an immortal being, surely he could have enacted some kind of psychic smack-down without killing him? I was also mildly disappointed by the very Christianized physical description of the devil and Hell when the cosmology of the novel encompasses so many different religions.

Aside from these, I enjoyed the story for what it was. The plot was interesting and the ideas suggested have a very "Matrix" feel to them, questions upon questions upon questions type of thing. There is a sequel advertised on the last page, and honestly, I have little or no interest in reading it. Isiah was an interesting character, but the end of the story had a very "pat" wrapped-up feel, and I would have preferred a less predictable close to a dark fantasy novel.
Ochach Ochach
Alan Baxter's first novel, RealmShift, is a smart, action-packed
multi-genre epic: dark urban fantasy, thriller, noir and horror, all
rolled seamlessly together.

In a world where every god and demon from every culture is exactly as
real as its followers believe it to be, Isiah is an immortal enforcer
for the Balance, a meta-deity that polices these strange and contrary
powers.

The story here is quite straightforward without being simple. The
Balance tells Isiah what it needs to happen early on in the book--the
fun is in seeing how it all plays out. There are plenty of twists and
wrinkles in the plot, but the story goes exactly where it's intended
without ever cheating.

The characters are deftly drawn. Even though there are greater forces
are dragging them into the conflict, the humans do their best to make
their own choices. The story really does hinge on what they have
learned throughout their journey. For all his power, Isiah is not
allowed to directly enact the Balance's will: his role is to prevent
gods and demons from interfering with ordinary humans.

Isiah himself is a bit seedy for a superman, which makes helps make
him sympathetic. He's quite moral, like the Balance he serves, but
he's a long way from being a saint. He's a man with a dirty job to do;
he's allowed to complain every now and again.

I'm a sucker for a good villain, and Carlos Villalopez, the primary
antagonist, is twisted and vicious and still sympathetic. Samuel
Harrigan, who is perhaps the real villain, is a talented psychopath
upon whose damned existence the Balance hangs. Much as Isiah despises
him, he has to protect the vicious bastard throughout the book and I
enjoyed seeing the hero compromised in this way. This dynamic makes
the book for me.

RealmShift does slow down through the middle as some of the characters
have to literally waste time while the rest of the pieces get in
place. Baxter fills this with exposition about the cosmology and the
way that 'magic system' works. To his credit, this never really feels
like an info dump--although it does drag a little. But even when the
pace of the story slowed, RealmShift never lost my attention.

This book is generally quite pacy and there are a few occasions where
it surprises you with a sudden laugh or an unexpected moment of
contemplation. The action scenes blend martial arts with magic without
getting breathless or self-indulgent. Dialogue is good and natural,
although on rare occasions the American characters sound British.

A good smart read. This is multi-genre spec fiction done right. I had
a great time with RealmShift and I'm looking forward to the sequel,
MageSign.
KiddenDan KiddenDan
This is one of those stories where the author apparently combined a lot of research into religions, history, culture, and archeology to write an amazing story. I really liked his development of the main characters and the continual balancing act of deities. However, I wasn't really fond of his loose portrayal of the spiritual world and faith and beliefs, etc. I have a strong spiritual side and that is where that comment comes from. However, Baxter did an amazing job of writing a great story. Well worth the read.