cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Life of a Colonial Fugitive
eBook The Life of a Colonial Fugitive ePub

eBook The Life of a Colonial Fugitive ePub

by Jonathan E Lee,Leonardo Noto

  • ISBN: 1475022913
  • Category: Action and Adventure
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jonathan E Lee,Leonardo Noto
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 17, 2012)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1586 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1479 kb
  • Other: azw lrf docx mobi
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 931

Description

Jonathan E. Lee was the idealistic youngest son of an eminent Virginian plantation clan until he made the mistake of. .

Jonathan E. Lee was the idealistic youngest son of an eminent Virginian plantation clan until he made the mistake of following his dashing older brother, "Light Horse Harry" Lee, into the nascent Continental What do you do when your commanding officer frames you to conceal his wartime atrocities, when you're facing the gallows for a crime that you didn't commit? You ru. Based in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, "The Life of a Colonial Fugitive" is a fictional, but historically accurate, tale of the globetrotting adventures of Jonathan E. Lee, a member of the esteemed Lee Family of Old Virginia.

You run Jonathan E. Lee was the idealistic youngest son of an eminent Virginian plantation clan until he made the mistake of following his .

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 8% restored. Главная The Life of a Colonial Fugitive. The Life of a Colonial Fugitive.

Young Jonathan E. Lee is falsely accused of heinous war crimes by his treacherous regimental commander! . I am Dr. Leonardo Noto, a former military battalion surgeon

Young Jonathan E. Lee is falsely accused of heinous war crimes by his treacherous regimental commander! Jonathan is forced to flee the colonies to save his neck from the hangman's noose, fighting his way across a stormy Atlantic and then joining a mercenary army that is deploying to warring Siam, a kingdom that is squirming under the iron-fist of a madman. Greetings! I am Dr. Leonardo Noto, a former military battalion surgeon.

It can mean an intense feeling of fear or shock or disgust.

Lee Family of Old Virginia. Settle in to your saddle and grasp the reins, because you're in for a galloping ride!Dr

The Life of a Colonial Fugitive. A historical thriller based in the American Revolution. Young Jonathan E. Lee finds himself falsely accused of heinous war crimes by his treacherous regimental commander. Jonathan is forced to flee the colonies to save his neck from the hangman's noose!

The Life of a Colonial Fugitive. Jonathan is forced to flee the colonies to save his neck from the hangman's noose! He fights his way across the stormy Atlantic and joins a mercenary army that is deploying to the war-torn Kingdom of Siam, a kingdom that is ruled under the ironfist of a madman. Greetings! I am Leonardo Noto, a military physician who recently returned from deployment with my first completed novel.

The Life of a Colonial Fugitive by Jonathan E. Lee (English) Paperback Book Free.

Jonathan Lee (born 24 April 1981) is a British writer best known as the author of the novels Who Is Mr Satoshi?, Joy, and High Dive. The Guardian has described Lee as "a major new voice in British fiction. The Observer called it 'elegant and incisive', The Independent said it was a 'masterful first novel', The Daily Telegraph called it a 'funny, insightful and beautiful' and The Daily Mail described the novel as 'dream-like.

Jonathan Lee is a passionate worship leader with a heart to lead people into the presence of a holy Go. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Page created - March 12, 2008. Oak Tree Productions. Music Production Studio.

What do you do when your commanding officer frames you to conceal his wartime atrocities, when you're literally facing the gallows for crimes that you didn't commit? You run! Jonathan E. Lee was the idealistic youngest son of an eminent Virginian plantation clan until he made the mistake of following his dashing older brother, "Light Horse Harry" Lee, into the nascent Continental Army. Now standing falsely accused of capital crimes, Jonathan is on the run, fleeing The Colonies for British Canada to save his neck from the hangman's noose. But little does Jonathan know that this is only the first brush with a violent death that he will face in the bitter years to come. Based in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, "The Life of a Colonial Fugitive" is a fictional, but historically accurate, tale of the globetrotting adventures of Jonathan E. Lee, a member of the esteemed Lee Family of Old Virginia. Follow Jonathan through the upheavals of the American Revolution, in a fratricidal struggle for independence as he fights alongside the militia of the sovereign Republic of Vermont, in a treacherous civil war as a soldier of fortune in the Kingdom of Siam, and finally as a mercenary in America's first foreign war, fighting valiantly against the hated Barbary Pirates of Mediterranean. Settle in to your saddle and grasp the reins, because you're in for a galloping ride! Dr. Leonardo Noto Practicing Physician, Former Airborne Battalion Surgeon, Author of Four Works, and Owner of "The Health and Medical Blog with a Personality."

Comments

MarF MarF
The story followed the life of a soldier, Jonathan Lee, through various wars of the 1700-1800s. It was written in a narrative from that time period using quite a bit of interesting vocabulary. There was not a lot of drama or suspense, rather was pretty much a straight forward narrative. A lot of historical information was explained, but many of the characters were basically names without too much detail of their characteristics. It was a fair enough story, but just not overly exciting.
Iriar Iriar
A novel so thoroughly researched, it's filled with footnotes. I once thought I had found a historical mistake, but once I looked it up, I learned I was wrong. This is a book that enthralls, and also teaches.

It's the story of Jonathan Lee, a brave soldier in the Colonial army, whose escape from captivity after his arrest by the army leads him to secessionist Vermont, an indigent existence in Europe, the life of a mercenary soldier in Asia, and finally the middle east! Spectacular as it all is, it never seems unbelievable, because of the careful history and the vividly described settings. The great triumph of this book is in telling a truly international story about the 18th century, one so vast, in which the personal is global, and vice versa.

What did I not like? I would caution the reader that the style will take some getting used to. We cut a little slack to Indie books on stuff like this. I am certain that had this book been signed up by Random House, a careful editor would have given it a good shearing, and Noto would have gotten the attention he deserved. But many Indie authors do it all themselves. So sometimes we get a great book, like this one, with some larger than life imperfections, but one still worth reading. In my view, it is "overwritten". I would not have the chutzpah to ask the author to re-write it (since it is a published book), so the reader should just be aware that, in spite of this writing style, there is much to like here. This is a good book. It is exciting. The characters are vivid. You will learn a lot. It really is a wild ride. But the main sin here is the sin of unnecessary words.

The types of unnecessary words falls into three categories. First, the simplest - the "double noun." Where I might say, "I went to a store on 4th street to buy some lettuce, which was on sale," a "double-noun" sentence would translate this as "I went to a store, a store that was on 4th street, to buy some lettuce, lettuce that was on sale." Noto does this all the time: "to the east it was bordered by crowded rice paddies, rice paddies that soon transitioned into darkly chattering jungles"; "My men advanced not towards the city gates, gates where the Lao stood waiting"; "they had planted explosives, explosives which had now been ignited"; "these terrible wars, wars that had seen tens of thousands of civilian deaths". This happens really frequently in the book.

The second type is unnecessary adjectives and adverbs, and redundancies. A swarm of black flies "punishing my men and I with their unrivaled tenacity." Or this: an "uncomfortable mix of fear and revulsion." (Could a mix of fear and revulsion be comfortable?) Or this: "I deliberately willed myself" (willing oneself is by definition deliberate). Or "lackadaisical complacency." "With no further reason for delay, out of excuses for further procrastination, I forced myself to swallow my jitters" (the first two clauses mean exactly the same thing); "each platoon commanded by a neatly attired and crisp appearing Lieutenant"; "my moisture-impregnated clothing", and so on. When explosives blow up a wall, he writes, "explosives had now been ignited into a fiery rapture that blew a gaping hole into what had only moments before been an impregnable fortification." You know, clearly it wasn't impregnable (which means that it's impossible to blow a hole into it), and I doubt the explosion was really a "rapture" (which is a joyful event). Sometimes a hole in a wall is just a hole in wall, and sometimes less is more.

Finally, unnecessary similes. "Scanning the room as a thirsty deer scans a pond that is full [of] alligators"; "like a wild hog cornered by hunting hounds, I had nothing to lose"; "like a family of wild hares being chased by a pack of famished hounds"; "the Captain barked orders like a rabid dog, moving his crewmen about his ship like a chess master pushing his pawns" (the chess master simile is used twice); "I contemplated suicide yet again, an ever present thought that plagued my mind like a parasitic mushroom feeding off of a sickly tree"; "I spouted as a roughly awakened dragon spews fire from his mouth"; "the remotest villages that peppered the Siamese backcountry as thickly as flies cover a meat pie that has been left on a windowsill". Sometimes the similes double back on each other - so while "rumor" spreads like the plague, and news of his crime disseminates like the plague, and an army attacks like a plague, the plague itself spreads, not like a plague, but "like a brushfire". Some simile is a good thing if it really tells the reader something, but there is just too much of it here just for its own sake, and it really distracts from the drama and excitement of the story.

I mention these things because without them, this book would have been five stars, easily. It is just so brilliant. So this is not a minor thing, and I am not nit-picking - it is an every-paragraph problem. This abundance of unnecessary words is so distracting that it took me a while to realize, with real surprise, that this is in fact a really good book, a nearly great book, and that buried underneath the unnecessary words is some really fine writing. A less patient reader might have put the book down. But once I realized this, I really enjoyed the book. The overloaded writing brings it down to 3.5 for me.

I would advise readers to be patient and stick with it. Still, highly recommended.
Ginaun Ginaun
As I am not to put any weight on my foot, I have been reading much more than normal, which means I am reading books I may not have chosen other wise.
This is a book that I wouldn't have chosen and I discovered I liked it.
No sexy scenes scattered just to draw your attention for sex only, but a book that shows how a person can have their life changed when they are really good and others want to get rid of them.
I would recommend this easy reading, holds your interest book.
Hiylchis Hiylchis
This novel had the potential to be a good story, but the lack of editing has destroyed its readability. Punctuation errors and grammatical errors abound. Character names change. Spelling was an afterthought. There are numerous run-on sentences that are impossible to follow. Contemporary language and terms are used in 1778 settings. All of these problems make a decent storyline hard to read. It was also apparent that the author used the thesaurus function on his word document way too often, utilizing "big" words that were, in context, incorrect. The overuse of flowery adjectives was extremely distracting, as well. A good editor would have helped make this novel better.
Via Via
Definitely not a romantic book. If you like action and swashbuckling, this is for you. I will not recommend this for my wife. Heck, I still am not sure what was fiction and what was historical. PS the hero must be a cat, because he definitely has 9 lives.
santa santa
Well written book of action that keeps you on the edge of your seat the whole time good attention to the period
Kulwes Kulwes
This is the story of one of the Southern Lee brothers. It had many an adventure, much information, explained but didn't dwell on the gory parts. I really liked the travels and the way it read. There were also insights into the military mind, history, and politics of the day. Enjoyable.
OK