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eBook Victim of the Aurora (Harvest Book) ePub

eBook Victim of the Aurora (Harvest Book) ePub

by Thomas Keneally

  • ISBN: 0156007339
  • Category: Action and Adventure
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Thomas Keneally
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; Second edition (September 28, 2001)
  • Pages: 234
  • ePub book: 1983 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1822 kb
  • Other: txt mbr rtf docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 422

Description

The book's conclusion is also consistent with the mores of the da. This is not really a book of Antarctic exploration. Keneally uses this ploy to show us a group of 26 men who spend many months in complete isolation during arctic darkness.

This is not really a book of Antarctic exploration. The men have different backgrounds and different professional specialties. An uneven lot, if there ever was one.

Home Thomas Keneally Victim of the Aurora. Ah. The aurora is brilliant not only in the Arctic, Mr Piers. In my experience the aurora australis of the Antarctic night is even more startling. I told him I had heard that and believed it. ‘You painted these pictures in situ, Mr Piers?’ he asked. Sit on the bed,’ he told me. I did so, arranging my legs either side of the scarred leather suitcase which protruded from under the bed-frame. Victim of the aurora, . Peter Sullivan at one time or another took a photograph of Sir Eugene working as he was now, frowning over papers against the background of books, bed and tattered luggage. Lady Stewart loved the photograph so much that that one – not the heroic, open-air shots of Sir Eugene be-furred, be-skied, visionary in the polar glare – was the one she hung in her living-room from 1913 till her death in 1952.

Thomas Keneally is renowned as the author of Schindler's List, which was awarded the Booker Prize and made into an Academy Award-winning film by Steven Spielberg. His latest work is The Great Shame, a narrative history of the Irish diaspora

Thomas Keneally is renowned as the author of Schindler's List, which was awarded the Booker Prize and made into an Academy Award-winning film by Steven Spielberg. His latest work is The Great Shame, a narrative history of the Irish diaspora. He is author of more than twenty works of fiction and nonfiction and is one of Australia's leading literary figures.

If we lied, then all institutions were liars. Perhaps it was some kind of Antarctic sasquatch or wild man who got him? the journalists pursued. I made a face as if they didn’t deserve an answer. Could you imagine young Woodsteins flying out to the West coast to grill me concerning Henneker’s South Polar fate? Other conditions have changed as well. I suffer long patches of what could be called coma. I am sitting in the sun on a Tuesday morning, say.

Victim of the Aurora book. well, just the mores of Edwardian society, I really enjoyed this book a lot.

Items related to Victim of the Aurora (Harvest Book). Thomas Keneally is renowned as the author of Schindler's List, which was awarded the Booker Prize and made into an Academy Award-winning film by Steven Spielberg

Items related to Victim of the Aurora (Harvest Book). Thomas Keneally Victim of the Aurora (Harvest Book). ISBN 13: 9780156007337. Victim of the Aurora (Harvest Book). ISBN 10: 0156007339 ISBN 13: 9780156007337. Publisher: Mariner Books, 2001. Thomas Keneally is renowned as the author of Schindler's List, which was awarded the Booker Prize and made into an Academy Award-winning film by Steven Spielberg.

A Victim of the Aurora. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. An Edwardian murder mystery set on the unforgiving Antarctic tundra.

Books related to Victim of the Aurora. Bring Up the Bodies (The Wolf Hall Trilogy, Book 2).

The thrilling story of an ill-fated expedition to the South Pole by the bestselling and award-winning author of Schindler's List.In the waning years of the Edwardian era, a group of English gentleman- adventurers led by Sir Eugene Stewart launched an expedition to reach the South Pole. More than sixty years later, Anthony Piers, the official artist of the New British South Polar Expedition, finally unveils the sobering conditions of their perilous journey: raging wind, bitter cold, fierce hunger, absolute darkness-and murder. The first two decades of the twentieth century were known as the "heroic era" of Antarctic exploration. In 1911, Roald Amundsen reached the South Pole. Weeks later, doomed British explorer Robert Falcon Scott arrived-and then perished in a blizzard. And in 1914, Ernest Shackleton embarked on his infamous voyage to Antarctica. Set during this epic period of adventure and discovery, Victim of the Aurora re-creates a thrilling time in an unforgiving place and is a brilliantly plotted tale of psychological suspense.

Comments

Kirizius Kirizius
If you've read everything you can find on Sir Ernest Shackleton's trips to Antarctica, seen the traveling exhibit with Frank Hurley's extraordinary photographs and memorabilia from the Endurance, and still crave more about Antarctic expeditions, this book will keep you interested and dreaming of such exploration for a few more hours.

Written in 1978, this is a murder mystery set near the South Pole in 1909, the same year as Shackleton's first expedition and five years before the Endurance epic. A similar crew of explorer-scientists and sailors, with the same attitudes and prejudices that one finds in the literary record of the Endurance, perform similar tasks under similar conditions, with one big exception. Captain Eugene Stewart (sharing initials with Ernest Shackleton) must also investigate his own crew as he attempts to unmask the murderer of Victor Henneker, the expedition's representative of the press, who intends to record the voyage for posterity.

With the same care for historic details and period attitudes which one sees in some of Keneally's later, prize-winning books, such as Confederates and Schindler's List, Keneally reveals Henneker to be a blackmailer who holds damaging information about almost everyone in the crew, their reputations vulnerable because they have violated the inflexible moral strictures of Edwardian England. A cuckolded husband, the secret lover of a married aristocrat, a mountain guide who may be responsible for a fatal excursion, a man tried for theft, and others "guilty" of homosexuality, Zionism, illegitimacy, and heresy reflect the pettiness and rigidity of "civilized" life in England and offer motivation both for the murder of Victor and for participating in the expedition. The book's conclusion is also consistent with the mores of the day. While this may not be the greatest mystery of all time, it is certainly one in which the author has done all his homework, well worth reading for the context it provides for other (real) expeditions of the day. Mary Whipple
komandante komandante
This is not really a book of Antarctic exploration. Keneally uses this ploy to show us a group of 26 men who spend many months in complete isolation during arctic darkness. The men have different backgrounds and different professional specialties. An uneven lot, if there ever was one. But, of course, they completely depend on each other. They must work as a tight community - and we await Keneally's thoughts of this "experiment". He introduces Victor Henneker, a journalist who has collected unsavory facts on people he meets, including most of the members of the expedition. Henneker gets killed, and his notes now become public knowledge. How do the explorers deal with what they now know about each other? Do they look at them now with different eyes? Most important: do they still trust each other?
Keneally gives us a fascinating portrait of people under the stress of a predicament they cannot flee. A fascinating book.
Dancing Lion Dancing Lion
A claustrophobic novel about a turn of the century Antarctic expedition which turns into a murder investigation when one of it's members is found dead on the ice. The bulk of the novel involves discovering the victim's past and how it interconnected with the lives of the other team members. An interesting, light-weight novel with a twist at the end. Read it on a snowy weekend.