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eBook The Paradise Eater ePub

eBook The Paradise Eater ePub

by John Ralston Saul

  • ISBN: 007054865X
  • Category: British and Irish
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: John Ralston Saul
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill (October 1, 1988)
  • Pages: 270
  • ePub book: 1525 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1938 kb
  • Other: lit lrf azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 405

Description

John Ralston Saul CC OOnt (born June 19, 1947) is a Canadian writer, political philosopher, and public intellectual.

John Ralston Saul CC OOnt (born June 19, 1947) is a Canadian writer, political philosopher, and public intellectual. Saul is most widely known for his writings on the nature of individualism, citizenship and the public good; the failures of manager-led societies; the confusion between leadership and managerialism; military strategy, in particular irregular warfare; the role of freedom of speech and culture; and critiques of the prevailing economic paradigm.

One of the lucky exceptions to this rule is The Paradise Eater by John Ralston Saul (not to be confused with the much more famous ‘horror’ novelist John Saul)

One of the lucky exceptions to this rule is The Paradise Eater by John Ralston Saul (not to be confused with the much more famous ‘horror’ novelist John Saul). The Paradise Eater begins with the novel’s protagonist, a Canadian expat named John Field, undergoing an examination to treat his persistent gonorrhea. This is his eighth infection in twenty years as an expat in Bangkok, an unbroken twenty years covered by an unbroken string of no fewer than 80, three-month tourist visas.

John Ralston Saul wants to make one thing very clear Hard-hitting, disconcerting, feverish and painful, The Paradise Eater takes John Field, an expat in Bangkok for more than two decades, through his last days there, pursued b. .

John Ralston Saul wants to make one thing very clear. I don’t like being lumped into that genre, Saul says. Hard-hitting, disconcerting, feverish and painful, The Paradise Eater takes John Field, an expat in Bangkok for more than two decades, through his last days there, pursued by killers for what he might know, determined to save two girls (one his daughter, the other a kind of slave he has bought) from the horrors which await them.

by. Saul, John Ralston. ark:/13960/t02z2cd36.

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John Ralston Saul is the International President of PEN International, an essayist, novelist, and long-time champion of freedom of expression.

ALSO BY JOHN RALSTON SAUL Nonfiction Voltaire’s Bastards: The Dictatorship of Reason in the West Fiction The Birds of.The DOUBTER’S COMPANION. A Dictionary of Aggressive Common Sense. Published by the Penguin Group.

ALSO BY JOHN RALSTON SAUL Nonfiction Voltaire’s Bastards: The Dictatorship of Reason in the West Fiction The Birds of Prey Baraka The Next Best Thing The Paradise. Penguin Books Canada Ltd, 10 Alcorn Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4V 3B2. Penguin Books Ltd, 27 Wrights Lane, London W8 5TZ, England. Viking Penguin, a division of Penguin Books USA In. 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, . Penguin Books Australia Ltd, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia.

Paradise Eater: The Field Trilogy. Book in the Field Trilogy Series). by John Ralston Saul. Having spent years living in Bangkok, with acquaintances who have been tortured in Laotian jails (yes really!), for me this book captures something of the dark underbelly of the region - displaying a depth of understanding which escapes many who visit briefly - those who stay long enough usually can't write so it remains undocumented.

Find nearly any book by John Ralston Saul (page 2). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Unconscious Civilization: Massey Lecture. ISBN 9780660183312 (978-0-660-18331-2) Canada Communication Group Pub, 2001.

Drunk, businessman, journalist, John Field finds his life becomes much more purposeful when he investigates the death of an ex-lover in steamy Bangkok, Thailand

Comments

Ubrise Ubrise
The main character is a Canadian expat living in Bangkok who has almost, but not quite, "gone native". While the story line is excellent, what I find fascinating is the ancillary cast of characters and sub-plots, which move through Bangkok as the economy is beginning to spiral upwards (the book was written in 1988). Hookers, corruption & a business trip to Laos are all included in plot and dealt with extraordinary expertise on the topical subject matter.
Read this novel first and then follow up with Christopher Moore's "Gods of Darkness."
Vital Beast Vital Beast
The run-of-the-mill crime novel written in or about Thailand is a pretty poor example of the genre. With only a few exceptions the typical Bangkok thriller is thin of plot, populated by two-dimensional characters and almost always completely inaccurate in its descriptions of the Kingdom. One of the lucky exceptions to this rule is “The Paradise Eater” by John Ralston Saul (not to be confused with the much more famous ‘horror’ novelist John Saul).

“The Paradise Eater” begins with the novel’s protagonist, a Canadian expat named John Field, undergoing an examination to treat his persistent gonorrhea. This is his eighth infection in twenty years as an expat in Bangkok, an unbroken twenty years covered by an unbroken string of no fewer than 80, three-month tourist visas.

Field makes his living as a go-between, for legitimate businessmen usually, but for others when the price is right, and while the novel has the requisite number of violent episodes, local color and femmes fatale, it is the author’s apparently intimate knowledge of Bangkok expatriate life that makes it a treasure for those of us who have lived in Thailand. Take this small example:

“The Bangkok Nursing Home had lost its position as the city’s only source of modern medicine decades before. The Thais had better hospitals and, for that matter, better doctors than the general expatriate variety. Still, the European community lent a great deal of importance to familiarity, even if it meant risking death. Familiarity was a form of religion: the Expatriate’s Faith.”

Familiarity, the Expat’s Faith. How true. Spend some time on Phuket, and tour the Irish bars, German restaurants and Italian ice cream shops that count expats as half their business. But the real joy of this book, for expats, comes in the wonderfully vicious description of a person named Henry Crappe. Here’s his introduction: “Crappe, of Crappe at the Flicks and Crap Reads for You and Crappe’s Bangkok; this last being a weekly analysis of new bars and new bar girls. All three columns appeared beneath his byline in the Bangkok Post.”

Sound familiar? Now listen to how Crappe defends his brand of journalism: “I am without any question the most controversial and widely read journalist in this city. I’ll admit that some people read me because they don’t like me, but that in itself is a sign of success. My name is up on the walls of half the washrooms in Bangkok. Why is that? Because I touch something within each of these people. Why again? Because my opinions are based upon education, intelligence and experience. I submit this without even mentioning the advice I give in other columns regarding literature and regarding the silver screen.”

Oh.. my.. God. It’s Bernard Trink in the very flesh.

Mr. Saul has written other good adventure yarns, about Southeast Asia and about Western Africa, but he knows Bangkok well and describes it beautifully, and “The Paradise Eater” should be required reading for anybody applying for the three-month tourist visa to visit Thailand, especially if they apply again and again and again…
Black_Hawk_Down. Black_Hawk_Down.
Having spent years living in Bangkok, with acquaintances who have been tortured in Laotian jails (yes really!), for me this book captures something of the dark underbelly of the region - displaying a depth of understanding which escapes many who visit briefly - those who stay long enough usually can't write so it remains undocumented.

By the way, I would love to know if his protagonist is based on the previous, aging, famously sexist writer for the Bangkok Post who goes under the pseudonym of the Nite Owl. I guess I'll never know. Hats off to JRS though - you have done what I suspected was not possible.