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eBook The Sensationist ePub

eBook The Sensationist ePub

by Charles Palliser

  • ISBN: 0345369580
  • Category: British and Irish
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Charles Palliser
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; 1st American ed edition (May 14, 1991)
  • Pages: 153
  • ePub book: 1461 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1389 kb
  • Other: docx txt lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 345

Description

Charles Palliser (born December 11, 1947 in Holyoke, Massachusetts) is a best-selling novelist, American-born but British-based. His most well-known novel, The Quincunx, has sold over a million copies internationally

Charles Palliser (born December 11, 1947 in Holyoke, Massachusetts) is a best-selling novelist, American-born but British-based. His most well-known novel, The Quincunx, has sold over a million copies internationally. He is the elder brother of the late author and freelance journalist Marcus Palliser. Born in New England, Palliser is an American citizen but has lived in the United Kingdom since the age of three

All books are picked, packed and dispatched from the United Kingdom.

All books are picked, packed and dispatched from the United Kingdom.

Sensationist Mass Market Paperback – 1 Sep 1992. by. Charles Palliser (Author).

Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases and classic fiction. Sensationist Mass Market Paperback – 1 Sep 1992.

The Sensationist book. Coming after the lengthily magnificent Quincunx, The Sensationist, set in the 20th century, shows Charles Palliser's versatility

The Sensationist book. Coming after the lengthily magnificent Quincunx, The Sensationist, set in the 20th century, shows Charles Palliser's versatility. Difficult to say I enjoyed it - I was so shocked by the ending that I had to leave the room where the book was. But the author intended it to be shocking, and definitely succeeded.

The Sensationist (Picador Books). Plangent, a new vocabulary word which I picked up from this book, and a good description of the story. Very Calvino-ish, yet different. Imagine short, descriptive vignettes of the unfolding of a relationship set in a uncaring city that is all about work, work, work.

But Palliser's niggardly withholding of detailsnames, places, even feelingsdeprives his parable not only of a circumstantial context but even of an atmosphere apart from its own minimalism. Anorexic fiction from a novelist who can carry weight better than most. For short takes on sexual obsession, stick with Josephine Hart's Damage (p. 67) or Paul Theroux's Chicago Loop (p. 139).

Flight Lieutenant Charles "Tich" Palliser, DFC, AE. Into the Storm of War - The Few. The Sensationist (Cape and Ballantine, 1991), ISBN 0-345-37935-7.

The Sensationist (Cape and Ballantine, 1991), ISBN 0-345-37935-7. Betrayals (Cape and Ballantine, 1993). The Unburied (Phoenix House and Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1999), ISBN 0-7434-1051-3.

1991) A novel by Charles Palliser. Library Journal What does a writer do for an encore when his first book, The Quincunx ( LJ 12/89), was an epic re-creation of a 19th-century English novel?

1991) A novel by Charles Palliser. Publisher's Weekly An English computer programmer is drawn into an obsessive, erotic affair in this emotionless novel. Library Journal What does a writer do for an encore when his first book, The Quincunx ( LJ 12/89), was an epic re-creation of a 19th-century English novel? Palliser returns with a slim volume that owes more to Kafka than Dickens. The titular sensationist is a modern everyman named David who takes an unspecified job in a nameless city.

Charles Palliser Booklist Charles Palliser Message Board. After the incredibly rich and complicated achievement of The Quincunx, which "out-Dickensed Dickens," this short novel comes as a dash of ice water

Charles Palliser Booklist Charles Palliser Message Board. After the incredibly rich and complicated achievement of The Quincunx, which "out-Dickensed Dickens," this short novel comes as a dash of ice water. The narration is cool, distant, and spare, and the protagonist, a young executive named David in a nameless European city that may be London or Edinburgh, decidedly unlikable

As the twentieth century ends, David, collecting women as conquests and discarding them, meets the unstable and irresistable Lucy and learns the power and peril of intimacy

Comments

invasion invasion
The novels of Mr. Palliser generally are closer to or well in excess of 500 hundred pages. Having been through, "The Quincunx" and "The Unburied", I found, "The Sensationist", and at a miniscule 153 pages and thought I had stumbled upon another Author of the same name. That this is certainly not the case is readily apparent when the reading begins.
A male protagonist obsessed with encounters with women that are unknown to him until they become the object of his brief amusement, is not a new idea. Mr. Palliser puts his own mark on this theme with an easily unlikable predatory male named David. More interesting than David and his cliché lifestyle is the structure of the narrative as it presents the story in what would generally be considered sound bites if spoken. Not only is the information delivered sparingly, it's also vague on detail and delivered in a staccato blitz. This is primarily the case with everything outside of his physical encounters, but even they tend to be abbreviated once the conquest is at hand. The chase is all that matters, a woman he invites to spend the evening is someone he resents for being in his presence in the morning.
David has another vice that is for readers to puzzle over which eventually will contribute to his slide down from a comfortable life just as the building in which he lives is literally settling at an angle, and threatens to eventually travel down hill like the rest of his world. Mr. Palliser eventually takes David down, however it is not as you might expect or have read in the past. His fall does arrive and it is brutal even beyond what he perhaps deserved. There is of course a victim but it is not the one that is expected.
The book initially put me off, as I am a great admirer of his longer complex period pieces. The book quickly will change a reader's mind for it is clever, uniquely presented, and like all of this man's work, brilliantly executed.
Shem Shem
Plangent, a new vocabulary word which I picked up from this book, and a good description of the story. Very Calvino-ish, yet different. Imagine short, descriptive vignettes of the unfolding of a relationship set in a uncaring city that is all about work, work, work. Selfishness and selflessness are examined in soundbites that, in the end, come together as a whole and in a completely satisfying way. Who loses in this kind of a world, our world? The adults seeking love for personal gratification or the children that live in the periphery? Or both? This short, one-night read, unlike any Victorian, plot-twisters which Palliser has written, goes deep.