cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Final Payments
eBook Final Payments ePub

eBook Final Payments ePub

by Mary Gordon

  • ISBN: 0140113657
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Mary Gordon
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; New Ed edition (1989)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1568 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1843 kb
  • Other: lit lrf docx lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 203

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. When Isabel Moore's father dies, she finds herself, at the age of thirty, suddenly freed from eleven years of uninterrupted care for a helpless man. With all the patterns of her life suddenly rendered meaningless.

Final Payments Mary Gordon. 4 people like this topic. Want to like this Page?

I bumped through the plot and characters in this story hoping to make some sense of it all to settle my emotional and cognitive incomprehension of the life choices of the characters, but I did not find any illumination about their motivations, or lack thereof until I read an interview given by the author in Commonweal shortly after the publication of ¨"Final Payments".

Final Payments by Mary Gordon seeks answers for living a meaningful life. Isabel Moore, Gordon's protagonist, lost her life purpose when her father died, and must reconstruct a new life without old roles, and religious formulas. Isabel Moore had been her father's caregiver for eleven years. After he dies she can finally live her own life, but she is so overwhelmed she can't move forward

by. Gordon, Mary, 1949-. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

by. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by LannetteF on January 4, 2010.

Mary Gordon is the author of eight novels, including Final Payments, Pearl, and The Love of My Youth; six works of nonfiction, including the memoirs The Shadow Man and Circling My Mother; and three collections of short fiction, including Th. ore about Mary Gordon. Category: Literary Fiction Women’s Fiction. People Who Read Final Payments Also Read. Inspired by Your Browsing History. People Who Read Final Payments Also Read

Mary Gordon is the author of six novels, including Final Payments and Pearl; two memoirs, The Shadow Man and Circling My Mother, and an earlier collection of stories, Temporary Shelter.

Mary Gordon is the author of six novels, including Final Payments and Pearl; two memoirs, The Shadow Man and Circling My Mother, and an earlier collection of stories, Temporary Shelter. She has received a Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Writer's Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the 1997 O. Henry Award for Best Story, and an Academy Award for Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, of which she is a member. She teaches at Barnard College and lives in New York City. The Company of Women.

The number "40" is written lightly in pencil on the opening inside page. Also has a minor scuff mark on the front cover. Book otherwise clean and in good condition. Grant Comes East A Novel of the Civil War by Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen.

Mary Catherine Gordon (born December 8, 1949) is an American writer from Queens and Valley Stream, New York. She is the McIntosh Professor of English at Barnard College. She is best known for her novels, memoirs and literary criticism. In 2008 she was named Official State Author of New York. Mary Gordon was born in Far Rockaway, New York, to Anna (Gagliano) Gordon, an Irish-Italian Catholic mother, and David Gordon, a Jewish father. Her father died in 1957 when she was young.

When Isabel Moore's father dies, she finds herself, at the age of thirty, suddenly freed from eleven years of uninterrupted care for a helpless man. With all the patterns of her life suddenly rendered meaningless, she turns to childhood friends for support, gets a job, and becomes involved with two very different men. But just as her future begins to emerge, her past throws up a daunting challenge. A moving story of self-reinvention, Final Payments is a timeless exploration of the nature of friendship, desire, guilt, and love.

Comments

Cargahibe Cargahibe
What will a self-sacrificing daughter do when her life of caring for her invalid father ends abruptly with his death? In the midst of her loss and pain, she must now make decisions that will determine her future. Will she go ahead and cut her ties to the life she led? Will she find an independence she lacked all these years?

These are the questions before Isabel Moore upon her father's demise. She had loved him, looked up to him, and now she must create a new life without him.

Isabel's friends Liz and Eleanor begin to step forward to aid in this metamorphosis. But it's Liz's husband John who offers Isabel an opportunity for a job she seems well-suited for. A job assessing the caretakers of the infirm, who are doing so with a government stipend.

First she must sell her family home, but she does so; she moves into a small apartment in the suburban town where she will work.

Another side-effect of Isabel's new life includes the reawakening of her sexual being. Two men become a part of her new life, but in an oddly unexpected way, the men bring about a self-doubt that will ultimately result in Isabel's turning away from her new life and returning to a life of self-sacrifice. But will she find what she seeks? Or will she ultimately decide that self-sacrifice is not the answer after all.

I enjoyed this passage which describes the conflicts Isabel faced in her new life as she was struggling to decide if she should go forward with her lover Hugh, whose wife had unleashed her fury upon Isabel in a very public way:

"There had been a gradual darkening in the background of my life with Hugh since he had first suggested leaving his wife. But after she had publically accused me of theft I began to accept the identity of a thief. I lived as though I had been forced into a hideout. It was February; the light was bad, as I imagined the light to have been bad in wartime London. I was afraid to go out of the house. It took a new kind of courage for me to go about the business of my daily life. I drove around the supermarket several times before I went in, trying to calculate the possibility of meeting anyone who had been at the party. In the years that I lived as the daughter of my father I had always been greeted with reverence and delight by shopkeepers, by people carrying groceries. I was the good daughter. I took care of my father. I had nothing to fear. Faces were open to me, for mine, they believed, was the face of a saint. Now faces would be closed to me, and I myself would learn to close my face...As the daughter of my father I was above reproach....."

Exploring themes of good vs. bad; the pull of desire weighed against the unique place of self-sacrifice in one's life; and the joys of the flesh contrasted with the possible rewards of giving to others, especially the undeserving--these provocative issues, and characters acting out these issues, populate this very compelling novel. Final Payments is all about what can happen when one makes choices, and it's also about the consequences of those choices.

I could not help but award this wonderful book five stars. I would recommend it to anyone who is a fan of Mary Gordon's work, as well as those who enjoy the exploration of these issues.
JUST DO IT JUST DO IT
Final Payments by Mary Gordon seeks answers for living a meaningful life. Isabel Moore, Gordon's protagonist, lost her life purpose when her father died, and must reconstruct a new life without old roles, and religious formulas. Isabel Moore had been her father's caregiver for eleven years. After he dies she can finally live her own life, but she is so overwhelmed she can't move forward. What should she do with the sickroom paraphernalia--the hospital bed, the wheelchair, the commode, and suction machinery? What should she do with the dirty house, the stacks of books, the "pileup of things and days and lives" (38)?

Disposing of stuff is simple compared to deciding what to do with her life. Her friends try to help, but she must do this for herself. When she was her father's caregiver the church rewarded her with the "good girl" label. Even though she had already given up her Irish Catholic faith, she took comfort in being known as good.

Isabel struggles with ethics and morality in a world without her father, and without the restraints of her childhood faith. She relishes sensuality. She has sex with her friend's husband, and then falls in love with another married man. Shocked at her own behavior she fights to make up for her sins. She needs purification. Her self-imposed punishment is to live with, and become caretaker for her old housekeeper Margaret Casey, a repulsive witch of a woman, whom she has hated since childhood. She reasons if she can overcome her hatred for Margaret, she will be redeemed. A nun once told Isabel she didn't have to like someone to love them in God. But Isabel never understood this. How could she love Margaret if she didn't even like her?

Mary Gordon, through the consciousness of Isabel, looks for answers to living a good life, a life of pleasure, of love, of pain, of loss--a life of meaning. She tells the truth about Catholicism, the place of women in the church, the gospel's mandate to love human beings. Her conclusions are sensitive and intelligent. Final Payments is real. It is about human redemption, but has no absolute answers.
Sha Sha
Incredibly deep and insightful, yet also a page-turner! Isabel was a truly complex, intelligent and realistic character. Although this book might be especially relevant to Catholics, this Protestant felt it illuminated issues all women contend with. Beautifully written.
Danial Danial
Mary Gordon is one of my favorite authors. I loved the biography of her mother "Circling My Mother" and that of her father "Shadow Man"and also "The Other Side". But it is "Final Payments" that I find most powerful and challenging. I read this book many years ago not long after it was published. I picked it up again this past fall (I am now 69) for a re-read and I am so glad I did. I found it so insightful concerning the Catholic Church with the confusion and conflicting "lessons" it presents to young adults especially in the areas of sexuality, pleasure, shame, guilt, sacrifice, and love. It was not unlike what I experienced as a young adult growing up in a very Catholic household. The idea of sacrificing what Isabel felt she had to sacrifice (if even for a short time) because of her shame and guilt was profound. No wonder so many Irish Catholics become alcoholic. The different and conflictual emotions I felt for Isabel reading it was a trying experience at times. Anyone who was raised Catholic and especially Irish Catholic will find this book astounding.
Lcena Lcena
Wonderful copy of this entrancing first novel.
Nuliax Nuliax
If you are a Mary Gordon fan, then this is another "must" for you. Other reviewers have left more detailed information. I merely recommend it.
Androlhala Androlhala
Being Catholic, experiencing the recent death of a parent are events that I have experienced with the author. Her viewpoint is very different than mine, but I found the book very engaging and so well-written. I recommend it for those dealing with the death of a parent and those who enjoy memoirs(autobiographical or fictional).
Very satisfied.