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eBook Blood Ties ePub

eBook Blood Ties ePub

by Jennifer Lash

  • ISBN: 0747535043
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jennifer Lash
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; New edition edition (February 19, 1998)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1956 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1876 kb
  • Other: txt azw doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 895

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. It tells of Violet Farr and her loveless marriage.

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Jennifer Anne Mary Alleyne Lash (27 February 1938 – 28 December 1993), also known as Jini Fiennes, was an English novelist and painter. In 1961, she published The Burial, her first novel, at the age of 23. Lash was regarded as one of the most promising young people among England's artists at the time. Upon meeting Lash in Suffolk, Dodie Smith, who wrote The Hundred and One Dalmatians, remarked that Lash was "almost too interesting to be true".

About Jennifer Lash: Born at Chichester, Sussex on 27 February 1938 to Joan Mary Moore, who was of Irish . Her final novel Blood Ties was published posthumously in 1997 and is widely regarded as her finest work. Jennifer Lash’s books.

About Jennifer Lash: Born at Chichester, Sussex on 27 February 1938 to Joan Mary Moore, who was of Irish Catholic descent, and Brigadier Henry Alleyne L. .

It tells of Violet Farr and her loveless marriage, her wild

It tells of Violet Farr and her loveless marriage, her wild, unfathomable son and his illegitimate son, all of them bound together in a repeating pattern of exile and homecoming, rejection and, finally, acknowledgement and love.

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urn:acs6:bloodties00lash 0:pdf:a6f-1a320958e819 urn:acs6:bloodties00lash 0:epub:3b2-c2bc0172a124 urn:oclc:record:1028860529. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on September 16, 2014.

Jennifer Lash's Blood Ties.

Author: Jennifer Lash ISBN 10: 0747535043. Title: Blood Ties Item Condition: used item in a good condition. All used books sold by Book Fountain. See all 2 pre-owned listings. Blood Ties by Jennifer Lash (Paperback, 1998). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing, New York, NY, . Publication Date: 1998.

ISBN 10: 158234003X, ISBN 13: 9781582340036. Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing, New York, NY, . It tells of Violet Farr and her loveless marriage, her wild, unfathomable son and his illegitimate son, all of them bound together in a repeating pattern of exile and homecoming, rejection and, finally, acknowledgement and love.

lt;< Previous book. 1997) A novel by Jennifer Lash. Violet Farr regretted that at her son's birth she had insisted that he be named after her father, Lumsden. With her passion for control, Violet was even maddened by the boy's ugly unruly ears. July 1999 : USA Paperback.

Violet Farr regretted that at her son's birth she had insisted that he be named after her father, Lumsden. With her passion for control, Violet was even maddened by the boy's ugly unruly ears. Aged seven, Lumsden unnerved his mother by exclaiming, 'You've got tigers in your teeth mummy.'

Comments

Ral Ral
Blood Ties is a real find--I wouldn't have known about it if her children (the Fiennes brothers plus producer sister) hadn't appeared on Charlie Rose to celebrate it. She has the abillity to reach depths that aren't usually covered in mainstream writing, with exquisite description and attention to images that hover and haunt. The poignant pathetic lives of the main characters are entered into with an expert scalpel, again by way of pictures that describe their state of being ( Janet McTeer would do a great Violet). There is a Lawrentian intensity throughout, but Lash's characters' passion is twisted inward. I don't quite buy the last minute redemption of Spencer and possibly Violet; it takes a great deal more to be capable of love in the long term, so maybe Spencer had to go out in a blaze of crumpled metal.
Kerahuginn Kerahuginn
Blood Ties, by Jennifer Lash. This is Ms. Lash's final book and it is emotionally harrowing. She has exposed, and skillfully, the substance of not caring and its consequences down the generations. There is a terrible price to be paid. I found the story heartbreaking and the acts of alienation hard to forgive. Equally skillfully, Lash looks at what it means to love, the work of the imagination in loving and its power to heal. She is a writer driven by ideas but her work is specific and her people impossible to forget. I'm so exceedingly sorry that she isn't here to write more.
Kieel Kieel
Excellent buy with a great reading experience...amazing work by aurhor Jennifer Lash.
Passed on to my daughter and to read in her book club.
Renthadral Renthadral
"Blood Ties" is an intense read that shows how the neglect of one generation can flood the later ones with the same emotional detachment. The story focuses mainly on Violet Farr, an educated and proud Irish woman, who, on a whim, marries Cecil Farr, a man who secretly struggles with his homosexuality. In their strained marriage, they give birth to a woman loathing, troublesome son, Lumsden, who they both don't care for. Through various affairs, he fathers a child named Spencer with Dolly, who also had a loveless relationship with her own parents, during a meaningless fling in England. Spencer, abused and neglected by Dolly after her bout with depression (Lumsden leaves her before he learns of the pregnancy), is passed off to his unwelcoming grandparents, only to be closed off. He becomes practically mute during his stay at the estate. After becoming frustrated with his lack of communication, the Farrs send Spencer away to live with the Chappells, where he's shown genuine love. Spencer begins a love affair with his 'sister', and the teens have a boy named Spencer Patrick, shortly before Spencer's sudden death in a bicycling accident. A few months after the baby is born, Violet is sent a letter from the mother, eventually allowing her to accept that young child into her life, ending the emotional detachment that plagued the family.

The book focused heavily on emotional abuse. Many of the characters, not knowing how to deal with their problems, took to alcohol, men/women, killing, and various other outlets. This dangerous pattern not only affected the sole character, but was passed down, leaving the next generation with no choice but to act in the exact same way; a domino effect of the sorts. Also, it is interesting to note that the characters, though beaten down by being lonely, all develop a familiarity, and almost comfort with it at the same time. For example, Violet, who longed to have Lumsden respect her, and treat her like a mother, yet she pushed him away at every chance she had, wanting distance.

Overall, the read itself was insightful and thought provoking. There were times though, when the text was confusing. Particularly in the beginning, which turns out to be a flashback; it can get a little foggy on what direction the book is headed. But, all in all, the diversity of the major themes in the novel weren't just shown as a one way street, all the characters had ways they dealt with their own baggage. Reading the novel requires patience, and a willingness to understand and not judge individuals too early; learning their past, and applying it gives a sense of sympathy for those directly affected by the disconnection within the family.
Grokinos Grokinos
This splendidly crafted work of fiction covers five generations of an Irish family and its focus is on the emotional lameness that can result from a lack of parental nurturing.
Despite violating every known convention of what schoolteachers call the mechanics of writing, Jennifer Lash offers us a magnificent novel of the effects of alienation and indifference on human development. Many think the opposite of love is hate, but this is not the case. The opposite of love is indifference. And this is Violet Farr's problem: she is totally indifferent to anything that involves affect, sentiment or love.
Worshipping the memory of her own dead father and married to a marginally conscious, sexually repressed gay man, Violet is rich, intelligent, cultured and extremely competent in dealing with things and ideas. She has an innate talent for managing things but is inept in her dealings with other humans at the level of emotion, especially as regards needs, apirations, individual interests, fears.
Her son, conceived only because her husband manages to fantasize about a delivery boy during coitus, soon turns into an unclean, foulmouthed drunk and gets shipped off to school in England, where he goes from bad to worse, finally begetting a child on a bimbo barmaid whose mother has died in an insane asylum.
Violet's grandson lives with his slovenly mother for several years but then gets trunked off to Ireland to live with Grandma, who is still emotionally unable to deal with the situation of having a young child around. After a particularly unfortunate incident involving a dead chicken she packs him off back to England as she had done with his father.
The boy goes to school for a while, lives in foster homes, and then takes to the streets and lives a life of meanness and horror in contact with unruly, violent young vagrants. He is rescued from it all by Winifred and her daughter, who nurse him back to health and stability and give him the human kindness he has been denied most of his life. After making love (but it is genuine love) to Winifred's daughter and inseminating her, he is killed in a bike accident.
The child of this liaison has the chance to bring a kind of redemption to Violet and her loveless existence.
The author has a special gift for rich characterization, and even her language changes as she moves from one personage to another describing them and their activities in individually appropriate terms. Only occasionally does she fall into stereotyping, as with the know-it-all priests and the wise, faithful family retainers.
This book can be recommended for anyone interested in human development or parent-child relations. It would also do nicely for those fascinated with the Irish literary tradition, of which it is a noteworth representative.