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eBook Too Many Women : A Nero Wolfe Mystery ePub

eBook Too Many Women : A Nero Wolfe Mystery ePub

by Red (cover) Saunders,Rex Stout

  • ISBN: 0006142230
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Red (cover) Saunders,Rex Stout
  • Publisher: Fontana; 11th Printing edition (1976)
  • ePub book: 1321 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1865 kb
  • Other: azw mobi rtf mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 714

Description

Yet another excellent Nero Wolfe book by Rex Stout ("Too Many Women . I thought I had read all of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe mysteries and was delighted to discover this one.

Yet another excellent Nero Wolfe book by Rex Stout ("Too Many Women," the 12th in the series, first published in 1947). This one's particularly lively since Archie is basically rolling in clover throughout it. The usual excellence in writing. I rate this series as the ultimate in the mystery genre, edging out even Poirot and Marple.

Too Many Women: A Bachelor's Story. Rex Stout (1886-1975) was the creator of Nero Wolfe, one of the most popular detectives of all time. Series: Nero Wolfe Mystery. This one has all the elements of a classic Wolfe/Goodwin story with the twist of a rare excursion outside of the 35th Street brownstone. Much ink is spent on the setup of the gourmet event, so it may bog down a bit for those who like to cut to the chase.

The Red Box: A Nero Wolfe Mystery. Too Many Cooks: A Nero Wolfe Mystery. Michael Prichard has recorded over 350 audiobooks, including many Rex Stout novels. Smart Money magazine lists him as one of the "Top Ten Golden Voices. A Family Affair: Nero Wolfe Mystery (Mystery Masters). Fer-De-Lance: A Nero Wolfe Mystery (Mystery Masters). Series: Nero Wolfe Mysteries.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Too Many Women: A Nero Wolfe Mystery as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Nero Wolfe 12 - Too Many Women. Its just a shame it has so many non-trivial. 175 Pages·2016·634 KB·9 Downloads·New!. Nero Wolfe: Too Many Women. 169 Pages·1981·657 KB·3 Downloads·New!. Many Lives, Many Masters. Awakening the Third Eye.

Book Club Hardcover in dust jacket Rex Stout Please Pass the Guilt 964462. A bomb in an executive's desk drawer. Please Pass The Guilt - Nero Wolfe must find out who planted a bomb in a TV executive's desk and why another man was the one who was actually killed. Death of a Dude - Nero Wolfe leaves his brownstone and travels across the country to a dude ranch in Montana! Because Archie Goodwin is involved in a murder.

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in. .Ten years later a seventy-third Nero Wolfe mystery was discovered and published in Death Times Three. The Red Box. Too Many Cooks.

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, in 1886, the sixth of nine children of John and Lucetta Todhunter Stout, both Quakers. Shortly after his birth. The Rex Stout Library. The League of Frightened Men. The Rubber Band.Ten years later, a seventy-third Nero Wolfe mystery was discovered and published in Death Times Three.

Rex Stout - Nero Wolfe Mysteries: Too Many Cooks. Rex Todhunter Stout was an American writer noted for his detective fiction. Pretty Sinister Books - Black Orchids by Rex Stout (A Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin mystery). Nero Wolfe and Rex Stout. What others are saying. One of the few times Nero leaves his house. Stout is best known as the creator of the larger-than-life fictional detective Nero Wolfe.

Vintage paperback

Comments

Gindian Gindian
This is a fun book that has a good plot and also does a good job of developing the characters. It is undeniably sexist, but I take that with a grain of salt because the book was written so many decades ago. Some people would consider the solution to the murder fairly obvious, but it's still a fun read, and some people wouldn't. This is the only book I know if where Archie tries to work undercover, and the results are interesting. There is some good comic relief in the book, and the background story is really good. One of the better Nero Wolfe books. I think you'd enjoy reading it. The only shame is that the women involved are seen as if they only exist as some kind of meat market, and Archie even mentions (more than once) that with one of the characters, she wasn't beautiful, but he could make her beautiful or she could be beautiful just to him. Part of the plot also involves telling a woman something because of the assumption that all women gossip. There's never a discussion of whether the men gossip, or a statement to the effect that gossip has nothing to do with gender and women are not gossips just because they are women. Archie also acts as if one floor of the office is some kind of Eden, because it's all women typists, etc., so he can simply look around and be surrounded by good-looking women, for the most part. He is also always careful to mention when he doesn't consider a woman good-looking, and will even do things like making a seating arranging in the office, where he's close to his definition of an attractive woman and far away from women he considers unattractive, and he's called women everything from dolls to crones.

However, I take all of this with a grain of salt, because this book was written many decades ago, so I try to just look to the book, itself. If you do that, I think you'll find a highly enjoyable book.
Coron Coron
Ho-hum. Yet another excellent Nero Wolfe book by Rex Stout ("Too Many Women," the 12th in the series, first published in 1947). This one's particularly lively since Archie is basically rolling in clover throughout it. The usual excellence in writing. The one thing that bothers me a bit is Stout's continuing caricaturization of Inspector Cramer. In the earlier works, Cramer was very competent and occasionally got a bit miffed with Wolfe. In this one, Cramer's still competent, but he's in permanent volcano mode every time he meets our protagonists. That's particularly irritating since Wolfe saved his bacon in the previous book. Still, it's a minor thing and I'm keeping my rating of an Excellent 5 stars out of 5.
Doath Doath
This is just a wonderful, light read. Stout's command of the English language and it's literary devices such as irony and satire frequently had me laughing out loud at the irrepressible Archie Goodwin's outlook on life. Stout is a master of intricate plotting and, succinctly put, the book is just a joy to read. I strongly recommend this series!
Umrdana Umrdana
Simply stated, this is another excellent and very entertaining Rex Stout novel. I am reading them chronologically and this is the 12th book in the series. Archie is a hoot. His wise-guy narration is so fun to read. Somehow he always achieves the most seemingly impossible tasks ordered by the genius, Nero Wolfe. Never read Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Series? Go online, get the list and begin reading them chronologically even though each book is a stand alone story. You'll enjoy them.
Jube Jube
it's not just the story of course, but how it's told. There are so many lines in here that I savored as I read , savored, sighed and wished that people spoke that way these days. Not that you really can in 140 characters.
Good mystery, and the author can be forgiven a little for his apparent fascination with beautiful working women.
Amhirishes Amhirishes
Funny, actually often LOL, with a good plot and quite a cast of plausible characters. Still not certain how Stout wove such comedic content into so many of his Wolfe mysteries.

I've been reading Wolfe and Goodwin for almost 50 years and have read all his efforts 4-5 times, many of them such as Women, even more.

I rate this series as the ultimate in the mystery genre, edging out even Poirot and Marple. Like my toothbrush, I don't expect everyone to share my opinion, but feel this title would be an excellent entry for a first timer.
Phallozs Dwarfs Phallozs Dwarfs
I thought I had read all of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe mysteries and was delighted to discover this one. It is a bit different from the others in that it is more Archie intensive and has the disgruntled boy from Ohio spending quite a bit of time away from "home," while getting nowhere on a case riddled with truths, lies, and everything in between, to the point where even the reader begins to doubt whether there really is a case. But of course, master of the narrative that he is, Stout does not disappoint. Immerse yourself in the relative innocence of yesteryear and enjoy the intriguing and humorous ride.
Rex Stout, with the help of his "Crew", keeps a smile on my face and detaches me from daily thoughts, some good, many less so, of the world around me. One can only be thankful for an on-going gift of this kind.