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eBook A Killing in Comics (A Jack Starr Mystery) ePub

eBook A Killing in Comics (A Jack Starr Mystery) ePub

by Terry Beatty,Max Allan Collins

  • ISBN: 042521365X
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Terry Beatty,Max Allan Collins
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Berkley Trade; First Edition edition (May 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 261
  • ePub book: 1905 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1723 kb
  • Other: lrf docx lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 873

Description

In "A Killing in Comics," Jack looks into the murder of comic book publisher Donny Harrison, motivated by. .The Jack Starr mysteries are fact-based and fast paced noir fiction at its pulpy best.

In "A Killing in Comics," Jack looks into the murder of comic book publisher Donny Harrison, motivated by the fact that two of Americana Comics' biggest sellers, Wonder Guy and Batwing, are syndicated in newspaper strip form by Starr. The suspects include the two young men from the Midwest who created Wonder Guy, and then sold the rights to Americana for a pittance, and the artist-creator of Batwing, whose lawyer father made sure he got a better deal. The way Collins slightly skews actual historical events to tell an engaging- and mostly historically accurate story -is engaging and brilliant.

Max Allan Collins (born March 3, 1948) is an American mystery writer. His work has been published in several formats and his Road to Perdition series was the basis for a film of the same name

Max Allan Collins (born March 3, 1948) is an American mystery writer. His work has been published in several formats and his Road to Perdition series was the basis for a film of the same name. He wrote the Dick Tracy newspaper strip for many years and has produced numerous novels featuring the character as well. Collins has written novels, screenplays, comic books, comic strips, trading cards, short stories, movie novelizations and historical fiction.

A Killing in Comics book . A noirish mystery story about the murder of a comic book magnate, this story is itself comic bookish in style and feel. Discovering Max Allan Collins’ Seduction of the Innocent where a pastiche of the infamous psychiatrist who wrote a supposedly non-fiction Seduction of the Innocent (insisting that because homosexuals perceived Batman and Robin’s, Bruce Wayne’s and Dick Grayson’s, relationship to be homosexual that the comic is a major cause of homosexual behavior) is murdered, I was delighted.

In the book, comic book industry troubleshooter Jack Starr investigates the death of a man crusading against violent comic . A Killing in Comics (Jack and Maggie Starr Series by Max Allan Collins, Terry Beatty (Illustrator).

In the book, comic book industry troubleshooter Jack Starr investigates the death of a man crusading against violent comic books. The book was inspired in part by Dr. Fredric Wertham. In 1954, Wertham published a non-fiction book, Seduction of the Innocent, that accused comic books of causing juvenile delinquency. America’s most famous exstriptease artist, glamorous Maggie Starr, now runs her late husband’s newspaper syndicate, distributing the Wonder Guy comic strip.

Artist Terry Beatty is the co-creator with Max Allan Collins of the long-running private-eye series, Ms. Tree. A Killing In Comics" is the first of three volumes in the Jack and Maggie Starr series, followed by "Strip For Murder" and "Seduction of the Innocent. Their other collaborations include Mike Mist, Mickey Spillane's Mike Danger, and Johnny Dynamite. It is a terrific historical mystery very much. Thriller & Crime Hard-boiled Women Sleuths.

Books, Comics & Magazines. Trade Paperback (Us),Unsewn, Adhesive Bound. People who viewed this item also viewed. Killing Quarry by Max Allan Collins 9781785659454 Brand New Free UK Shipping. Max Allan Collins: A Killing in Comics (PB) {Very Good]. Killing Game by Collins, Max Allan.

A cutting-edge mystery novel that combines the illustrations of Batman artist Terry Beatty with a New York Times bestelling author. America's most famous exstriptease artist, glamorous Maggie Starr, now runs her late husband's newspaper syndicate, distributing the Wonder Guy comic strip. Wonder Guy, soaring superhero, represents all that is good about postwar America. But when the cartoon character's publisher winds up dead, Maggie finds herself working with her stepson Jack Starr (also her .

Written by Max Allan Collins. Dover Mystery Classics: A Killing in Comics SC (2015 Dover) By Max Allan Collins. Former striptease artist Maggie Starr continues "stripping" by distributing comic strips through her late husband's newspaper syndicate. Cover by Stephen Gardner. Dover Mystery Classics: A Killing in Comics SC (2015 Dover) By Max Allan Collins Tags: Dover Mystery Classics. Published Dec 2015 by Dover Publications. When the heated rivalry between a pair of her cartoonists ends in homicide, Maggie and her stepson, Jack, turn detective.

In 1948, when the publisher of the blockbuster "Wonder Guy" comic strip is found dead, Maggie Starr joins forces with her stepson, Jack Starr, to uncover a killer among a host of suspects.

Comments

Modar Modar
Max Allan Collins' "A Killing in Comics (A Jack Starr Mystery) is the first in a trilogy of novels set in post-World War II New York, in the comic book and comic strip industries. Jack Starr, a decorated war veteran, works for his late father's Starr Syndicate, now headed by the Major's ex-stripper wife, Maggie. Jack's main job is to clean up the messes created by the syndicate's "talent," using his private investigator's license and his inside knowledge of comics to go where the police can't.
I searched Amazon for this book after reading "Seduction of the Innocent," the third book in the trilogy, which I enjoyed immensely. I also purchased "Strip for Murder," the second Jack Starr mystery, but I haven't read it yet.
In "A Killing in Comics," Jack looks into the murder of comic book publisher Donny Harrison, motivated by the fact that two of Americana Comics' biggest sellers, Wonder Guy and Batwing, are syndicated in newspaper strip form by Starr. The suspects include the two young men from the Midwest who created Wonder Guy, and then sold the rights to Americana for a pittance, and the artist-creator of Batwing, whose lawyer father made sure he got a better deal. And then there's Donny's mistress, Honey Dailey, in whom Jack develops a more then professional interest, Donny's wife, and the unsung co-creator of Batwing, a writer who was left out of the artist's sweet deal.
Anyone interested in the history of comic books will recognize the boys from the Midwest as Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster, creators of Superman, and the Batwing creators as artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger. The names have been changed to put them into a murder mystery scenario that closely parallels Siegel and Schuster's long fight with DC Comics for creator rights, and the Kane-Finger saga.
The period details in "A Killing in Comics" are as precise as the comics history. The characters are well-drawn, with spare, smart dialogue and descriptions. The action flows fast, but never gets confusing. The mystery element plays fair with the reader. The sexual elements are handled tastefully. The whole package is framed with chapter heading illustrations by Collins' partner on the "Ms. Tree" comic book series, Terry Beatty. All in all, it's a fun ride that should appeal to both mystery and comics fans.
Zeli Zeli
This is a fun, light-hearted murder mystery. Although Collins uses different names in the story, the book is clearly about the two young men who created Superman and then signed away all the rights to the character. The story is set in the late 1940s and the author includes lots of period detail as well as a wealth of material on the comics industry at the time. It's a well constructed mystery that keeps the reader guessing who did it until the last page. A light read for a summer afternoon, especially for anyone interested in the history of the comic strip industry.
Xellerlu Xellerlu
A fun read. MAC never disappoints. Tells a great story about the Superman oops Wonderman controversy.
Silly Dog Silly Dog
The Jack Starr mysteries are fact-based and fast paced noir fiction at its pulpy best. The way Collins slightly skews actual historical events to tell an engaging- and mostly historically accurate story -is engaging and brilliant. I highly recommend all three books in this series.
SiIеnt SiIеnt
A fun comics roman a clef
elegant stranger elegant stranger
"A Killing In Comics" is the first of three volumes in the Jack and Maggie Starr series, followed by "Strip For Murder" and "Seduction of the Innocent." It is a terrific historical mystery very much in the tradition of Collins' Nathan Heller series. It is hard boiled and filled with period references. It packs just the right amount of attitude and humor to be highly readable. Although the background of the story is certainly steeped in the comic book publishing world of the late forties, you don't have to know much about that industry to enjoy it.

Take a glad-handing, overweight publishing executive. Dress him in a superhero costume - Wonder Guy to be precise. And, have him drop dead while cutting the cake at his birthday party thrown at his mistress's suite at the Waldorf-Astoria with his wife in attendance as well as several comic writers who are bitter about their contracts. All of a sudden, it seems like you have the makings of a story.

Better yet, throw in a gorgeous world-famous ex-stripper who runs a comic syndicating service and her stepson, a private detective. Also, throw in s mobster or two, a homicide detective, a blonde whose blue eyes seem to hypnotize every man, and half a dozen others with murder motives and you've got a lot real good story brewing.

Nothing weak or flimsy about this story. This is a solid one.