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eBook Obasan ePub

eBook Obasan ePub

by Joy Kogawa

  • ISBN: 0140067779
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Joy Kogawa
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Canada (March 1, 1983)
  • ePub book: 1534 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1188 kb
  • Other: txt doc lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 454

Description

Obasan, by Joy Kogawa is a breathtaking, heart-wrenching novel about the Japanese internment in Canada during World War I. Joy Kogawa does an amazing job as an author in titling the book as Obasan, a respectful term for aunt in Japanese.

Obasan, by Joy Kogawa is a breathtaking, heart-wrenching novel about the Japanese internment in Canada during World War II. This novel, told through the eyes of Naomi Nakane, begins with the death of her uncle. While in the novel our protagonist seems to only call Uncle Sam’s wife obasan, there is another aunt that displays as much influence on Naomi as Obasan does, but in a quite opposite manner.

OBASAN Joy Kogawa First published by Lester & Orpen Dennys Lt. Canada, 1981 Penguin Group (Canada) a. .This book is dedicated to the memory of my parents, and of those amazing people, the Issei. To him that overcometh. Canada, 1981 Penguin Group (Canada) a division of Pearson Penguin Canada In. 1983, 2003 David R. Godine Publisher.

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Obasan is a novel by the Japanese-Canadian author Joy Kogawa. First published by Lester and Orpen Dennys in 1981, it chronicles Canada's internment and persecution of its citizens of Japanese descent during the Second World War from the perspective of a young child. In 2005, it was the One Book, One Vancouver selection. The book is often required reading for university English courses on Canadian Literature. It also figures in Ethnic Studies and Asian American Literature courses in the United States.

Updates on Joy's literary works. Canadian author Joy Kogawa took in an operatic performance based on her novel Naomi's Road as Ucluelet kicked off its Japanese Cultural Heritage Festival on Tuesday

Updates on Joy's literary works. Canadian author Joy Kogawa took in an operatic performance based on her novel Naomi's Road as Ucluelet kicked off its Japanese Cultural Heritage Festival on Tuesday. From left: recreation programmer KK Hodder and recreation assistant Nicole Laderoute join Kogawa and the NHK film crew documenting Kogawa's West Coast experience. Open house upcoming on Tofino rec.

Winner of the American Book Award Based on the author's own experiences, this award-winning novel was the first to tell.

by. Kogawa, Joy. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by as on September 28, 2012.

Joy Kogawa was born in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1935 and graduated from high school in Coaldale, Alberta where her family was sent after WWII. Kogawa has won awards for her book Obasan, including the Books in Canada, First Novel Award, the Canadian Authors Association, Book of the Year Award, the Periodical Distributors of Canada, Best Paperback Fiction Award, the Before Columbus Foundation, and The American Book Award. Библиографические данные.

Электронная книга "Obasan", Joy Kogawa. JOY KOGAWA was born in Vancouver in 1935 to Japanese- Canadian parents

Электронная книга "Obasan", Joy Kogawa. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Obasan" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. JOY KOGAWA was born in Vancouver in 1935 to Japanese- Canadian parents. During WWII, Joy and her family were forced to move to Slocan, British Columbia, as part of the Canadian government’s policy to relocate and intern Japanese-Canadians. Kogawa is the author of several award-winning novels and volumes of poetry.

In Joy Kogawa's novel Obasan, the author's changing perspective and style presents the author's past memories with different attitudes. Download the Study Pack. Obasan Lesson Plans contain 155 pages of teaching material, including: Obasan Lesson Plans.

A powerful and passionate novel, Obasan tells, through the eyes of a child, the moving story of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War. Naomi is a sheltered and beloved five-year-old when Pearl Harbor changes her life. Separated from her mother, she watches bewildered as she and her family become enemy aliens, persecuted and despised in their own land. Surrounded by hardship and pain, Naomi is protected by the resolute endurance of her aunt Obasan and the silence of those around her. Only after Naomi grows up does she return to question the haunting silence.

 

Comments

Kagrel Kagrel
Obasan, by Joy Kogawa is a breathtaking, heart-wrenching novel about the Japanese internment in Canada during World War II. This novel, told through the eyes of Naomi Nakane, begins with the death of her uncle. As she thinks back on all of the time she spent with her uncle and Obasan, which means aunt in Japanese, she remembers the events of her childhood during the war. She remembers her mother who went to Japan right before the war and never returned, her father who died of tuberculosis in the camp, her paternal grandparents who also died in the camps, her maternal grandparents who died in Japan during the bombings, and her many friends that she never saw again. Throughout this haunting story she tells of the horrible conditions that she and her family were forced to live in and the way that they were treated by the white Canadian population. Despite being Canadian citizens themselves, they were shunned by the rest of society simply because of their background and skin tone. The author, a Japanese Canadian who was interned during the war herself, shows how unjust and inhumane the treatment of these people was. This novel is extremely enlightening, showing its readers just what life was like in these camps. Many people try to gloss over this period in history and forget the horrible things that happened, but this novel and its depictions of this side of the war will stay with me and remind me how humans can turn on one another in times of fear and war. It serves as a reminder that though people are of the same nationality as those who do harm, they are not to be blamed for their country’s actions. I would give this novel a five star rating because of how engaging and heart-wrenching it was. It is not a book that you can put down once you have picked it up.
Qulcelat Qulcelat
Joy Kogawa does an amazing job as an author in titling the book as Obasan, a respectful term for “aunt” in Japanese. While in the novel our protagonist seems to only call Uncle Sam’s wife “obasan,” there is another aunt that displays as much influence on Naomi as Obasan does, but in a quite opposite manner. Obasan is all about silence and little words. Obasan responds to most events with silence or a small set of “barely audible” words: “Everyone someday dies” (14). As a reader, I was initially frustrated with the small number of words that came out of both Uncle Sam and Obasan’s mouths and wondered how Naomi endured it. The two relatives did not seem to answer simple questions from the protagonist and for several chapters, I continuously wondered, “Why?” Kogawa reveals that silence is Obasan’s go to in response to pain and suffering. Uncle’s death was not responded with loud sobbing of anguish, but rather expressed with silence and acceptance of the fact that “Everyone someday dies.” Obasan, who has also experienced the racial prejudice, got property taken and liquidated by the Canadian government, and saw relatives torn from family, does not speak out. She believes that the past’s sufferings are meant to be forgotten, unlike Aunt Emily. Aunt Emily is another obasan, but is addressed as Aunt Emily. Aunt Emily would probably resort to silence as the very last response to the pain and injustice done to Japanese-Canadians. She believes that anger must be “passed down in [their] genes,” and that “the past is in the future.” If one resorts to silence, the pain will come again, because it was never fought back against in the past. Naomi’s interactions with the words of both her obasans not only revealed that the two aunts are an obvious foil for each other, but also created a lasting impact on the protagonist, Naomi Nakane. What made Obasan just short of 5 stars may have been my fault as a weak reader. While I admired the precise detail and culture that Kogawa had woven so intricately into the novel, Obasan’s general structure is quite unique, because instead of narrating as one tells a simple story to another, this novel is a continuous train of thought stationed in Naomi Nakane’s mind. I personally found this “train of thought” as a hurdle that made it difficult for me go back and forth between character to character and between flashbacks to the present time. However, due amidst the mazes of thoughts running through Naomi’s mind, I felt personally more connected, sympathetic, and even empathetic to Naomi and her family’s experiences. Even if I was not present during the times of prejudice that spanned America and Canada during and after WWII, Joy Kogawa successfully communicates the pain and suffering of Japanese-Canadians during the war through the silence of Obasan and the outspoken nature of Aunt Emily, who are both obasans to Naomi Nakane.
Xig Xig
In her novel Obasan, Joy Kogawa presents an eye-opening account of the little-known hardships endured by Japanese Canadians during World War II. The novel begins with the narrator, Japanese-Canadian schoolteacher Naomi Nakane, explaining how the sudden death of her uncle prompts her to visit her elderly aunt, whom Naomi calls “Obasan.” During her stay with Obasan, Naomi revisits her childhood through flashbacks, informing the reader of the family’s Japanese history and the very close bonds formed and maintained among the family members as they begin a new life for themselves in Canada. Unfortunately, as World War II draws near, these strong relationships begin to deteriorate or even become completely destroyed after the Canadian government disperses and relocates Japanese families, seizes personal property, and denies Japanese-Canadians of their basic civil rights.

In my opinion, Naomi Nakane’s story of persecution and hardship serves as a reminder of the importance of using one’s voice during times of personal struggle. Throughout the novel, Naomi describes the language of silence spoken by several members of her family; Naomi states, for instance, that “from both Obasan and Uncle [she has] learned that speech often hides like an animal in a storm” (4). From a very young age, the family’s adoption of silence influences Naomi and causes her to develop the habit of remaining silent through difficult times. For example, when Naomi is four years old, she suffers from sexual abuse from her adult neighbor, and Naomi explains that although she wished for someone to come rescue her, she felt that she was “not permitted to move, to dress, or to cry out” because her family “[would] see [her] shame” (76). Sadly, Naomi’s fear of speaking aloud prevents her from getting the help she needs, and the continued abuse leaves a scar on her childhood memories. In contrast, Naomi’s Aunt Emily strongly encourages speaking one’s mind, and is even described as “a word warrior… a crusader, a little old gray-haired Mighty Mouse…” (39). Unlike the rest of the family, who silently suffer through the internment of Japanese Canadians during World War II and choose not to speak about their experience, Aunt Emily proudly decides to address the issues of the past as a way to seek justice and avoid any recurrences in the future. Thanks to Aunt Emily, Naomi eventually learns that her mother, who left for Japan before the war and was presumed dead after years of silence, became horribly disfigured as a result of the bombing of Nagasaki and purposely asked that her children never hear of her tragic fate. Although Naomi’s mother chose to be silent about her torment for selfless and loving reasons, Naomi and her brother Stephen both suffered tremendously as they had to spend the rest of their lives without hearing from their mother. Just as Naomi’s silence worsened her own suffering at a young age, Naomi’s mother’s silence caused her own children to suffer, and at the very end of the novel, Naomi laments, “Gentle Mother, we were lost together in our silences. Our wordlessness was our mutual destruction” (291).