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eBook Goodbye Tsugumi ePub

eBook Goodbye Tsugumi ePub

by Banana Yoshimoto

  • ISBN: 0571212840
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Banana Yoshimoto
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber (2003)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1641 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1172 kb
  • Other: azw lrf mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 373

Description

Also by banana yoshimoto: Kitchen. Goodbye Tsugumi : a novel, by Banana Yoshimoto ; translated from the Japanese by Michael Emmerich.

Also by banana yoshimoto: Kitchen.

Goodbye Tsugumi book.

Although Yoshimoto still uses her brilliant description of scenes which are wonderful to read but the problem I had with this book was that I could not identify with any of the characters in this book.

Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Although Yoshimoto still uses her brilliant description of scenes which are wonderful to read but the problem I had with this book was that I could not identify with any of the characters in this book. Marie is rather boring; while Tsugumi is just plain horrible and it is hard to understand why Marie puts up with her. The secondary characters in the book have little to no depth to them. I normally really like Banana Yoshimoto's books but this one is definitely not as good as some of her others.

Banana Yoshimoto’s novels of young life in Japan have made her an international sensation. Goodbye Tsugumi, called a witty, perceptive novel by Elle, is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work

Banana Yoshimoto’s novels of young life in Japan have made her an international sensation. Goodbye Tsugumi, called a witty, perceptive novel by Elle, is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work. Maria is the only daughter of an unmarried woman. She has grown up at the seaside alongside her cousin Tsugumi, a lifelong invalid, charismatic, spoiled, and occasionally cruel. Now Maria’s father is finally able to bring Maria and her mother to Tokyo, ushering Maria into a world of university, impending adulthood, and a normal.

Goodbye Tsugumi (TUGUMI) is a novel written by Japanese author Banana Yoshimoto (吉本ばなな)in 1989 and translated into English in 2002 by Michael Emmerich. Goodbye Tsugumi was made into a movie in 1990, directed by Jun Ichikawa

Goodbye Tsugumi (TUGUMI) is a novel written by Japanese author Banana Yoshimoto (吉本ばなな)in 1989 and translated into English in 2002 by Michael Emmerich. Goodbye Tsugumi was made into a movie in 1990, directed by Jun Ichikawa. Tsugumi is a sickly but feisty and somewhat unpleasant young girl living in a small Japanese seaside town at the family inn with her parents, sister Yoko, aunt Masako, and cousin Maria (the protagonist)

Goodbye Tsugumi is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work. Goodbye Tsugumi - Banana Yoshimoto.

Goodbye Tsugumi is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work. Now Maria’s father is finally able to bring Maria and her mother to Tokyo, ushering Maria into a world of university, impending adulthood, and a normal family. 13 14 15 16 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. The Haunted Mailbox. I t’s true: Tsugumi really was an unpleasant young woman.

Banana Yoshimoto's novels of young life in Japan have made her an international sensation. Goodbye Tsugumi, called a "witty, perceptive novel" by Elle, is an offbeat story of a deep and complicated friendship between two female cousins that ranks among her best work.

BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader. Goodbye, Tsugumi by Banana Yoshimoto, translated by Michael Emmerich. Readers: Young Adult, Adult. Published: 2003 (United States).

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Comments

avanger avanger
Marie, the protagonist, is the narrator of this story. Inasmuch Marie grows up in Japan at the seaside along with her cousin, Tsugumi, an invalid, charismatic, spoiled young woman who can be quiet cruel to others. Marie is the illegitimate child of her mother's lover who happens to be married to another woman but who visits them every weekend at the seaside. Finally though Marie's father gets a divorce and brings her and her mother to Tokoyo so Marie can attend university. But one last summer is spent by Marie at the seaside and this is when Tsugumi finds love and Marie realizes what home and family really mean.

Although Yoshimoto still uses her brilliant description of scenes which are wonderful to read but the problem I had with this book was that I could not identify with any of the characters in this book. Marie is rather boring; while Tsugumi is just plain horrible and it is hard to understand why Marie puts up with her. The secondary characters in the book have little to no depth to them. I normally really like Banana Yoshimoto's books but this one is definitely not as good as some of her others. If you have never read Yoshimoto before I suggest you start with "Kitchen" and move on to "Asleep" and/or perhaps "Lizard." These novels are more enjoyable to read and the characters are so much better in them than in this particular novel. Overall this is not the worst book I have ever read but I expect so much more from Yoshimoto.
Larosa Larosa
An adventure in translation. Yoshimoto wrote in Japanese. I bought this translated into Italian and used an English translation of the Japanese to help read the Italian. Tsugumi is a very ill teenager who is oppositional, snag nasty and a miserable little bitch. She enjoys playing nasty tricks on people thinking they're funny. Ha ha let's put some maple syrup in your hair.The people around her cut her a lot of slack because of her frail health. The narrator thinks that notwithstanding her foibles, Tsugumi is... well, Tsugumi. Reminds me of the saying that everyone likes a nice guy, but we just love a scoundrel. Until they steal your car and wallet,try to have sex with your dog and set fire to your house. Then they aren't so cute. The narrator's family story is of interest. The novel ends in an improbable sequence of events (one night frail, weak, marginal health Tsugumi digs a hole at the beach deep enough for someone to fall into). The setting is a provincial seaside Japanese village. This isn't great literature, but it would make a decent young adult diversion and a fun book for a student of Italian. The cover of the Italian edition has a rather alluring young woman with her head on her arms on a table. The woman wears a very short skirt and high heels. Very sweet sight. I picked it up, loved the author's name. It was short, fun book.
Boraston Boraston
Reading Yoshimoto is a good counter to the Philip Roth I've been reading lately. Whereas Roth's prose is energetic and in-your-face, Yoshimoto's flows like a gentle stream. Even the little tirades of Tsugumi, Yoshimoto's bratty title character, has nothing of the unsettling energy of a character like Roth's Portnoy. Instead, Yoshimoto's stories have a beauty that is almost ethereal. Granted, I have yet to be moved as much as I was by Yoshimoto's first novel, Kitchen. Still, this novel came close.
It is the story of a young woman, Tsugumi, who has been dying since the day she was born from some unnamed illness. Except that she continues to live despite occasional lapses into sickness. But her seeming physical weakness and poor health has made all those around her cater to her relentlessly and she has grown into a spoiled and mean young woman. The story is told by Maria, a friend of Tsugumi's. Through Maria's eyes we see Tsugumi's petty cruelties but also her capacity for love and an incredible inner strength that keeps her alive, inspiring Maria to accept the challenges of her own life.
In some ways, Tsugumi is one of the most interesting characters Yoshimoto has created. And she avoids many of the cliches that often seem to inhabit books where a key character is facing death. Once again, Yoshimoto has created a slim volume of incredible beauty.
Rishason Rishason
This is another Banana weird and funny story! If you ever met an intriguing provocative person that ususally gets on your nerves this book might make you take a fresh look at his or her character and embrace his or her eccentricity!