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eBook The Book of Secrets ePub

eBook The Book of Secrets ePub

by M.G. Vassanji

  • ISBN: 1841956864
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: M.G. Vassanji
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd; New Ed edition (February 23, 2006)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1931 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1462 kb
  • Other: azw lrf lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 924

Description

INTERNATIONAL ACCLAIM FOR THE BOOK OF SECRETS Vassanji masterfully weaves an. .

INTERNATIONAL ACCLAIM FOR THE BOOK OF SECRETS Vassanji masterfully weaves an extraordinarily colorful and richly complicated carpet. A big book in every sense. As I read this book about exiled people squeezed by war and circumstance, I thought of other novels that seem its cousins: Timothy Findley’s Famous Last Words, Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient, Graham Greene’s The Heart of the Matter. Lawrence Scanlan, Globe and Mail. A poignant, questioning work that confirms Vassanji as one of our most thoughtful, as well as one of our more able, writers.

The Book of Secrets is a novel by M. G. Vassanji, published in 1994. It was the winner of the very first Giller Prize for Canadian fiction

The Book of Secrets is a novel by M. It was the winner of the very first Giller Prize for Canadian fiction. Vassanji also became the award's first-ever repeat winner in 2003 for his novel The In-Between World of Vikram Lall.

Book of Secrets may refer to: The Book of Mysteries, also known as The Book of Secrets, an ancient Essene text found in fragmentary form among the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Book of Secrets (novel), 1994 novel by M. Vassanji. Books of secrets, compilations of technical and medicinal recipes and magic formulae, published in the 16th–18th centuries. Sefer ha-Razim (The Book of Secrets), a Jewish mystical text. The Book of Secrets, 1974 book series by Rajneesh.

The Book of Secrets: A N.has been added to your Cart. From the book, I found that M. Vassanji (an Indian descent from Eastern Africa) has an excellent grasp of history and well understanding of local cultures around his childhood region

The Book of Secrets: A N. Vassanji (an Indian descent from Eastern Africa) has an excellent grasp of history and well understanding of local cultures around his childhood region. He turned these ingredients into a recipe and prepared them into this novel.

The Book of Secrets book. In 1988, a retired schoolteacher named Pius Fernandes receives.

In his isolation he had often longed for even a brief foray into the European life of Nairobi. iat, was considered an indulgence, but was approved, by his DC, Hobson of Voi. It was the morning of the day before Nairobi’s Race Week when he arrived. You realize, of course, Mrs. Unsworth said to Corbin with a glint in her eye, that the Norfolk, Torr’s, the Embassy, all the clubs - everything in Nairobi - is absolutely booked.

The Book of Secrets - . Because it has no end, this book, it ingests us and carries us with it, and so it grows

The Book of Secrets - . Because it has no end, this book, it ingests us and carries us with it, and so it grows. But it began simply, the story of this book, an unusual discovery put into the hands of an out-of-work schoolteacher, who at last found his calling and began to work with an industry and enthusiasm he had not mustered since his apprentice days. I am that former schoolteacher. In my time I taught a generation or more of schoolboys.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Book of Secrets: A Novel" для . M. Vassanji was born in Kenya and raised in Tanzania

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Book of Secrets: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Vassanji was born in Kenya and raised in Tanzania. He attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was writer-in-residence at the University of Iowa in the International Writing Program. He is the winner of the Giller Prize, the Bressani Literary Prize, the Regional Commonwealth Prize, and the Harbourfront Festival Prize.

Read "The Book Of Secrets" by .

Comments

Ubrise Ubrise
There is a point in every book when you suddenly realise you are hooked and for Book of Secrets it happened quite early for me as I got immersed in the diary of Mr. Corbin. The descriptions are of a world one knows existed but had never read about before; the shuffling of the story between the years provides a good perspective on what time does to our lives. The book works on so many levels; a mystery, a tale of fesity men and women, a story of traditions. Well written with the characters nearly intertwined with one another; I would recommend this book to everyone!
Moogura Moogura
Required reading, very happy to have it.
Blackredeemer Blackredeemer
It is not only my facination with Africa that made this book special. Vassanji really makes his characters come out of the book, inprints them in your head so they become so real you end up imagining they are your own personal friends. Haven't read a book I enjoyed so much in a long long time. when it came to an end, I wanted more. I really recomend this book to everyone, whatever their reading interest may be. This book will not dissapoint them.
Na Na
Slightly difficult written for a non native, but content wise great
Kabandis Kabandis
This story is very long and difficult to follow. I felt a that it dragged on unnecessarily. Tough one to get finished and I usually enjoy stories of old India.
Tegore Tegore
Mr. Vassanji is one of my favourite authors. This book was the first to win the prestigious Giller Prize and it is the last one in my quest to read all the Giller Prize winners which I undertook about a year ago. I really enjoyed this book, both for the history and for the people that Mr. Vassanji has created. The book is about the changes experienced in an East African nation-from a Commonwealth Country, through a war and onto independence. Of course there are growing pains, both for the nation and for the people, but this nation does manage to come through all of that. This book is a book of generations that lived through all these tumultuous times. The story stretches from 1918 to 1988 and is connected by a diary left by a young British Commissioner from the time that he served in a small town called Kikono. A retired schoolteacher is given the diary in the 1980's and he sets out on a personal quest to ferret out the secrets that are exposed by this diary. Vassenji easily slips from one era to another in this book. And all from the perspective of one town in East Africa called Dar. That is where the schoolteacher is and that is where the diary has eventually turned up (in a storage room in an old shop). The book paints such vivid pictures of a time and place that I felt that I was there. Excellent book. The only place where it fell down a bit for me was in the fact that many of the mysteries were left unexplained. But that is really not so different from real life after all.
Still In Mind Still In Mind
From the book, I found that M. G. Vassanji (an Indian descent from Eastern Africa) has an excellent grasp of history and well understanding of local cultures around his childhood region. He turned these ingredients into a recipe and prepared them into this novel. The historical accounts were extremely thoughtful and entertaining. Local taboos, customs, habits were all exploited by Mr. Vassanji in great lengths.

During some of the novel Indian descendant characters life experiences in England, he has vividly enliven his characters feeling being a second-class citizen for not being whites; and vice-versa being other than blacks during the Kenya and Tanzania pre-independence moments, other races were also allocated into second-rate citizens. It is a socially true prejudice which was more rampant during the years after WW II.

I also found it interesting, that many words in Kenyan and/or Indian may have been of Arabian origins, such as "kitabu". Kitabu = kitab (Indonesian) = book (English).

This book was written in Pius Fernandes' (his chief protagonist) point of view. Pius was a history teacher at Kikon, British East India during the colonial reign. It started when Pius found a very old diary of Alfred Corbin from 1913. He traced Corbin's experiences up to when Corbin stopped writing at all. Becoming curious, Pius started his own journey into researching what had become of Corbin and other main characters of this novel. Eventually, it was Pius himself who will get entwined into his old memories.

Mr. Vassanji is a real smooth-operator, moving between Pius (the more recent character) and older characters, moving between 1913 to end of WW I to end of WW II to 1988, when he found Corbin's diary. Another unsolved remaining secret at the end was whether Ali was Pipa's real son or not was never revealed by the author. Really "A Book of Secrets."

A very good, commendable read. I like it, a four-star.