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eBook Rumpole of the Bailey (Paragon Large Print) ePub

eBook Rumpole of the Bailey (Paragon Large Print) ePub

by John Clifford Mortimer

  • ISBN: 0792715314
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: John Clifford Mortimer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Chivers North Amer (December 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 265
  • ePub book: 1739 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1940 kb
  • Other: docx azw mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 558

Description

Rumpole of the Bailey Hardcover – 1 Apr 1991. by John Clifford Mortimer (Author). Witty and incisive, Rumpole of the Bailey contains six short stories about a British barrister as he takes on cases, deals with colleagues and family, and travels through the ups and downs of his life.

Rumpole of the Bailey Hardcover – 1 Apr 1991. Like any lawyer, Rumpole has to wade his way through the varying personalities he has to defend, some of them downright strange. In one case, he is chosen as defense counsel because the family expects him to lose.

Witty and incisive, Rumpole of the Bailey contains six short stories about a British barrister as he takes on cases . I have not seen one solitary second of the television series that made Horace Rumpole a fixture for awhile on public television. I'm glad however, I took the route to Old Bailey.

Witty and incisive, Rumpole of the Bailey contains six short stories about a British barrister as he takes on cases, deals with colleagues and family, and travels through the ups and downs of his life. 3 people found this helpful.

Horace Rumpole is a barrister who typically tries his cases in London's Old Bailey

Horace Rumpole is a barrister who typically tries his cases in London's Old Bailey  . Horace Rumpole is a barrister who typically tries his cases in London's Old Bailey. The early short story collections in this series were adapted from screenplays of the television series.

Rumpole of the Bailey is a British television series created and written by the British writer and barrister John Mortimer. It starred Leo McKern as Horace Rumpole, an elderly London barrister who defended a broad variety of clients, often underdogs. The TV series led to the stories being presented in other media including books and radio. The "Bailey" of the title is a reference to the Central Criminal Court, the "Old Bailey".

In "Rumpole of the Bailey", John Mortimer has served up a veritable smorgasbord of short snappy tales that are . The first title in the popular series by John Mortimer has Rumpole, the claret swigging, small cigar smoking barrister, facing off against the prosecution in six adventures.

In "Rumpole of the Bailey", John Mortimer has served up a veritable smorgasbord of short snappy tales that are the very best that British courtroom humour has to offer. This may well be the funniest book that I have ever read.

Rumpole of the Bailey is a series of books created and written by the British writer and barrister John Mortimer based on the television series Rumpole of the Bailey. Mortimer adapted his television scripts into a series of short stories and novels starting in 1978. Rumpole of the Bailey (1978) (adaptations of the scripts of all six stories in TV Season One). Rumpole and the Younger Generation". Rumpole and the Alternative Society".

Rumpole of the Bailey. Rumpole of the Bailey. by. Mortimer, John, 1923-2009. John Mortimer is a playwright, a novelist and a lawyer. During the war he worked with the Crown Film Unit and published a number of novels before turning to the theatre. His plays include The Dock Brief, What Shall We Tell Caroline?, The Wrong Side ofthePark and Voyage Round My Father.

Horace Rumpole, the irreverent, iconoclastic, claret-swilling, poetry-spouting barrister at law, is among the most .

Horace Rumpole, the irreverent, iconoclastic, claret-swilling, poetry-spouting barrister at law, is among the most beloved characters of English crime literature. He is not a particularly gifted attorney, nor is he particularly fond of the law by courts if it comes to that, but he'd rather be swinging at a case than bowing to his wife Hilda, ed. In this first title of the popular series featuring Rumpole, all of the major characters who occupy the Rumpole stories make their introductions: the sneaky, slightly effeminate Erskine-Brown, the bumbling Guthrie Featherstone.

Mortimer, John Clifford - Rumpole 01 - Rumpole of the Bailey. Mortimer, John Clifford - Rumpole 01 - Rumpole of the Bailey. Download (txt, 361 Kb) Donate Read. EPUB FB2 PDF MOBI RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Book by Mortimer, John Clifford

Comments

Mitars Riders Mitars Riders
Witty and incisive, Rumpole of the Bailey contains six short stories about a British barrister as he takes on cases, deals with colleagues and family, and travels through the ups and downs of his life. Like any lawyer, Rumpole has to wade his way through the varying personalities he has to defend, some of them downright strange. In one case, he is chosen as defense counsel because the family expects him to lose. In another, he defends a British MP accused of rape who wants to be convicted so he can get away from his overly ambitious wife. In a third tale,, he is charmed by an attractive hippie who may or may not have been involved in the sale of a considerable amount of what the police always initially refer to as "a leafy substance."

One of the most interesting aspects of Rumpole is his humanness. He admits to having been in love, at least emotionally if not physically, with women other than his wife, Hilda, known as She Who Must Be Obeyed, to whom he became wed as sort of a professional obligation.He drinks plenty of claret, and lectures his prospective daughter-in-law on the dangers of drinking water. He is saddened when the longtime Head Clerk of Chambers is found to be a petty embezzler, and tries to prevent his firing. While not a bleeding heart for his clients, and not at all blaming society as the impetus for any criminal activity, he is determined to do his best, and he does, once almost at the cost of his reputation and license.

I have not seen one solitary second of the television series that made Horace Rumpole a fixture for awhile on public television. I'm glad however, I took the route to Old Bailey.
Coron Coron
This is a collection of short stories dealing with Rumpole and his clients. Of course, Hilda or She Who Must Be Obeyed, is a constant presence. The biggest problem is the English vernacular opposed to American slang. I decided the watch several of the stories that were presented as a series on BBC. Many of the nuances that are missed in the book are depicted on the screen. The humor is not the slapstick humor of I Love Lucy, but more like the Kramdens of the Honeymooners. The British court system is different than the American court system and the flow of the story suffers from this difference. I like the underlying lesson of each story, such as a parent's responsibility for a child or the loyalty of one employee to another employee
Zainian Zainian
another great Rumpole
Coirad Coirad
Excellent story as expected print rather small but worth the read
Breder Breder
Considering it to be the first of the series, I enjoyed it a lot
Fenrikree Fenrikree
I didn't enjoy it that much but parts are very humorous.
Viashal Viashal
The aging barrister Horace Rumpole was originally created as a television character, but his writer John Mortimer soon adapted those stories for the literary medium, resulting first in this collection of short stories that presents some of Rumpole's most notorious cases before the English courts. This fictional defense lawyer is a very funny fellow, not nearly as clever as he thinks he is, but still far cleverer than his colleagues or clients would like to admit. Mortimer is skilled at both presenting and piercing Rumpole's pomposity, all without ever turning the audience against him.
John Mortimer, a retired barrister (lawyer), offers to take us into the mysterious world of British law. He spoofs the silly, pompous and ego-inflated lawyers he knows while trying to save his defendant from the gallows.

He makes fun of `She Who Must Be Obeyed' and adores his son Nicholas. When in the presence of `She Who..,' Horace Rumpole feigns obedience while sharing with the reader what he REALLY thinks.

If you are looking for some short stories that have flash and/or somber drama, look elsewhere. However, readers who give Rumpole time to spin out his tale will be rewarded with wry wit and a fun look at the British legal system from the inside.

I would much rather read a single story vs. several short stories because there, by necessity, is little character development. However, in Mortimer's 21 Rumpole books, he keeps his cadre of cronies. Thus, over the course of a few short stories, we learn the `modus operandi' of the secondary characters - warts and all.

What I love about Rumpole is that he is so irreverent - he's willing to lampoon anyone, including himself. He likes to come across as a foolish oaf; however, watch him harpoon the opposition with clever tactics and a sharp mind. He brings the `Old Bailey' to life.