cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » An Accidental Man
eBook An Accidental Man ePub

eBook An Accidental Man ePub

by Iris Murdoch

  • ISBN: 0701132620
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Iris Murdoch
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Chatto and Windus; Collected Ed edition (August 31, 1987)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1626 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1814 kb
  • Other: lit rtf lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 699

Description

AN ACCIDENTAL MAN, Iris Murdoch’s fourteenth novel, is a candidate for being her most discomfited and most discomforting one. If we think Shakespearean models – and Iris Murdoch often di. .

AN ACCIDENTAL MAN, Iris Murdoch’s fourteenth novel, is a candidate for being her most discomfited and most discomforting one. If we think Shakespearean models – and Iris Murdoch often did . It is not uncommon in Iris Murdoch’s fictions for the would-be good people and for goodness to flounder, for the godly to renege and to fall, for moral mayhem and evil to flourish, for moral crashes and smashes and disasters to abound and for some fearful accident to occur as the sign of humanity’s proneness to moral bad luck. But the scale of such negativity in An Accidental Man is what makes its pessimisms seem so arrestingly awesome.

The old, once vital, remembered myths, still vivid in many characters’ minds as they are in Murdoch’s, prove to be mainly vain fantasies. As ever, this Murdoch text comes heavily seeded with a vocabulary of the good

The old, once vital, remembered myths, still vivid in many characters’ minds as they are in Murdoch’s, prove to be mainly vain fantasies. As ever, this Murdoch text comes heavily seeded with a vocabulary of the good. Good!, people keep saying, good-good-good, jolly good, good for him and so on. The great plethora of common English phrases involving goodness is always on these people’s lips – on to a good thing, with good wishes, good lover, good friend, too good for me, too-good-to-be-true and the like – is no doubt a way of indicating, as usual with Murdoch, the presence, despite ourselves, of a moral sense, the residue of the.

He pictured himself there like a man picturing paradise. He feared disappointment like a man fearing hell. Of course whatever happened now he would stay on in England after his London scholarship year was over. Athena had here sufficiently seized him by the locks. All the elements of his case were clear to him and he had no more doubt about the rightness of his decision. The war was a piece of absolute wickedness in which he would take no part.

Best known as the author of twenty-six novels, Iris Murdoch has also made significant contributions to the fields of ethics and aesthetics

by Iris Murdoch · Philippa Gregory. Best known as the author of twenty-six novels, Iris Murdoch has also made significant contributions to the fields of ethics and aesthetics. Collected here for the first time in one volume are her most influential literary and philosophical essays. The Sovereignty of Good (Routledge Classics).

An Accidental Man is a novel by Iris Murdoch, which was published in 1971. It was her fourteenth novel. The complex story is set in London and involves a large number of characters, many of whom are related to each other by family or marriage. The "accidental man" is the hapless but charming Austin Gibson Grey, whose actions drive much of the plot

An Accidental Man book. I found this to be an excellent Iris Murdoch novel. Big complex ideas, typical cast of Murdochian characters all of whom are somehow connected to the others.

An Accidental Man book. This is actually a very readable, even gripping read.

An Accidental Man (1971) is another of Iris Murdoch’s ebody-else . I think Murdoch has written books with more

An Accidental Man (1971) is another of Iris Murdoch’s ebody-else circular firing squad of love extravaganzas, but unlike some of the best ones, this one felt oddly bloodless, perhaps because so many of the participants are such oddballs that empathizing with them is difficult. I think Murdoch has written books with more

An Accidental Man. Iris Murdoch.

An Accidental Man. But are we not all accidental, one of his victims asks

I actually liked this book! By Thriftbooks. com User, June 6, 2002. Believe it or not this is a pretty good book. It is a bit dated since much of it relates to agonizing over Vietnam War draft dodging and there is just the beginning of open writing about gay relationships. In general there is a lot of agonizing over trivialities among the characters in this book. by. Murdoch, Iris, 1919-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Comments

Cerana Cerana
Austin Gibson Grey is a bungler and a bumbler--someone you'd expect to be both harmless and innocuous. He can't keep a job; his most recent employment has been eliminated by computerization, at the recommendation of consultants he has been led to believe were interior decorators. He is a schemer whose indolence keeps him from accomplishing anything, and as he enters middle age he has survived for far too long on his good looks. Yet people around him, both companions and complete strangers, keep suffering from horrible injuries or even death, from paralysis to electrocution to suicide, and his role in each tragedy ranges from simple obliviousness to negligent homicide.

"Not doom, not fate, accident," says Matthew, Austin's brother, reassuring the sister of one of the victims. Well, not quite. Matthew, the exact opposite of his brother, is a globetrotting diplomat and Zen-inspired saint who has returned home to witness the final disintegration of Austin's life, and he spends much of his homecoming either making excuses for his brother's foolish carelessness or helping to cover up his latest ruinous catastrophe. "Bad luck is a sort of wickedness in some people," is the assessment made by another character, who commands her fiance to stay away from Austin entirely.

And that wickedness can manifest itself in any number of ways: several characters are guilt-ridden solely for what they didn't do. One witnesses a murder on the streets of New York, another avoids meeting a distraught friend just before she attempts suicide, and even Matthew himself helplessly see a demonstrator whisked away by the secret police in a foreign country. Every human being falls victim to a butterfly effect: we can choose to be heroes, accomplices, or bystanders, but we can't remove ourselves from the vagaries of life. Even a man who shuts himself away, Thoreau-like, from the whims and cruelties of society will end up hurting (or helping) those he left behind. There is no escape from our effect on others. As one character realizes, "Absolute contradiction seemed at the heart of things and yet the system was there, the secret logic of the world."

This is one of Murdoch's more readable and accessible novels. As in her later (and better) work, "The Good Apprentice," she creates comedy--sometimes drawing-room, sometimes slapstick, sometimes farce--out of a series of tragedies. True, the relationships in Murdoch's grand-scale soap opera can get a tad confusing. Not only are most of the characters related to each other across three families (the Gibson Greys, the Tisbournes, and on the sidelines the Odmores), but everyone is also in love with everyone else--and always with someone who doesn't love in return. But even the complications of all these relationships and relatives and randomly appearing acquaintances and strangers underscore the interconnectedness of everyone's lives. To emphasize this point even further, Murdoch includes several sections composed entirely of gossipy dialogue at a party or of letters among the characters. (These passages are among the snappiest, and sometimes funniest, in the book.) Everyone is part of the conversation, or being talked about, or being deliberately ignored--but they are always there.

So there are no true accidents here, and there are no accidental men (or women). Instead, in Austin's hands, obliviousness becomes a strategy. Austin's only area of expertise is his innate ability to play the victim; he transforms everyone else's tragedy into his own. "Of course he is a vampire . . . And he knows it and he knows we know it," one of his enabling friends thinks. "Aren't we all accidental?" Austin's so-called bad luck is a form of instinctive "cunning." He is the kind of social sponge who will never change, and in the end, amid the detritus of the lives he has had an "inadvertent" hand in destroying, "the stage has been set again by whatever deep mythological forces control the destinies of men."
net rider net rider
An Accidental Man (1971) is another of Iris Murdoch’s she-loves-him-he-loves-her-she-loves-somebody-else circular firing squad of love extravaganzas, but unlike some of the best ones, this one felt oddly bloodless, perhaps because so many of the participants are such oddballs that empathizing with them is difficult. Some reviews note the large cast of characters but I didn’t think that was a problem. I think Murdoch has written books with more. The problem was that they really are more characters than people so there is an artificiality to the proceedings that acted, at least to me, like a glass wall preventing any emotional engagement with them. This would be toward the bottom of the list if I were to rank the Murdoch novels I’ve read (I’m reading them chronologically).
Ustamya Ustamya
My first attempt at Iris Murdoch's work, and difficult to review, as although I recognise that the quality of writing, the deeper messages on morality etc, mean it's probably worth at least 4.5, I didn't desperately like it.
Opening with the breathless engagement of an American draft dodger and his rather shallow British girlfriend, the narrative soon introduces a host of other characters that make up their circle, most notably Austin Gibson-Grey, with his skeletons in the closet, an estranged wife, and various nefarious activities...
Murdoch writes in a variety of styles, the usual narrative being interspersed with a series of letters, or an impression of a party given through two or three pages of one-line comments, giving everyone's news and gossip in a humorous way.
It's a far-fetched tale, though I think the author's depiction of lonely and unloved Charlotte Ledgard was convincing.
The characters seem to be largely bisexual, switching from feelings from one to the other.
Glad to have come to the end, although by no means unreadable.
Kemath Kemath
In "An Accidental Man," Iris Murdoch yet again casts her cynical eye on the dysfunctional and hypocritical British upper class. The book seems in many ways an early draft of "An Honourable Defeat," with many overlapping characters and themes. By itself, "An Accidental Man" comes across as bloated and immature, and I found the book difficult to get through. Yes, it's a problem that not one of the characters is sympathetic and it's another that the plot is disjointed and sprawling, but the major problem is that the stakes seem so low, and that whatever happens to the characters does not fundamentally matter to them or to those around them.