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eBook Mazel ePub

eBook Mazel ePub

by Rebecca Goldstein

  • ISBN: 0140239057
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Rebecca Goldstein
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (September 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1974 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1923 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 167

Description

Rebecca Newberger Goldstein (born February 23, 1950) is an American philosopher, novelist and public intellectual. She has written ten books, both fiction and nonfiction.

Rebecca Newberger Goldstein (born February 23, 1950) is an American philosopher, novelist and public intellectual. in philosophy of science from Princeton University and is sometimes grouped with novelists, such as Richard Powers and Alan Lightman, who create fiction that is knowledgeable of, and sympathetic toward, science.

Rebecca Goldstein write novels of philosophy, where a question takes the central role more than any of the characters. The question I see in this novel is not only the role of luck (mazel) in history, which might also be called the role of chance or Fortune, but a more specific question of what Jews must do to survive

com's Rebecca Goldstein Author Page. Rebecca Goldstein is a MacArthur Fellow, a professor of philosophy, and the author of five novels and a collection of short stories. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

com's Rebecca Goldstein Author Page.

Mazel means luck in Yiddish, and luck is the guiding force in this magical and mesmerizing novel that spans three generations. Sasha Saunders is the daughter of a Polish rabbi who abandons the shtetl and wins renown as a Yiddish actress in Warsaw and New York. Her daughter Chloe becomes a professor of classics at Columbia. Chloe s daughter Phoebe grows up to become a mathematician who is drawn to traditional Judaism and the sort of domestic life her mother and grandmother rejected.

After Rebecca Newberger Goldstein grew up in White Plains, New York, and graduated summa cum laude from Barnard College, receiving the Montague Prize for Excellence in Philosophy, and immediately went on to graduate work at Princeton University, receiving her P. While in graduate school she was awarded a National Science Foundation Fellowship and a Whiting Foundation Fellowship.

Mazel is the imp of metaphysics. Brimming with es, Sasha's life covers almost eighty years and brings her from the Old World to the New. Mazel is the legacy she passes down to her daughter, Chloe, a freethinker of the sixties, and to her granddaughter, Phoebe, a mathematician of the nineties. This enormously delicious and appealing multigenerational novel is as rich, dense, and layered as a piece of Sacher torte.

Rebecca Goldstein Rebecca Goldstein.

After Cass Seltzer's book becomes a surprise best seller, he's dubbed "the atheist with a soul" and becomes a celebrity. He wins over the stunning Lucinda Mandelbaum, "the goddess of game theory," and loses himself in a spiritually expansive infatuation. A former girlfriend appears: an anthropologist who invites him to join in her quest for immortality through biochemistry. From the acclaimed writer and thinker-whose award-winning books include both fiction and nonfiction-a dazzlingly original plunge into the drama of philosophy, revealing its hidden but essential role in today's debates on love, religion, politics, and science.

Goldstein expands on a story in her collection, Strange Attractors (1992), in. .

Goldstein expands on a story in her collection, Strange Attractors (1992), in this lively exploration of the ways chance intermingles with determinism in human lives. Sasha Saunders' beloved granddaughter is about to have a baby, and Sasha is so angry she could spit. Goldstein expands on a story in her collection, Strange Attractors (1992), in this lively exploration of the ways chance intermingles with determinism in human lives.

A novel of three generations of Jewish women begins with Sasha, the matriarch, who has learned of Mazel, the great confounder of order and predictability, from her experiences in pre-war Warsaw and her current life in New York, as she passes this knowledge onto her daughter and granddaughter. Reprint.

Comments

Uste Uste
This book gives the reader much to think about as the book's pages are turned. This book spans the generational, cultural, religious and historical events that shape the women in a family. I like to expand my world by reading books that give me insight into cultures and historical events. I gain compassion and understanding for people. I also learn world history from the perspective of a character who has lived the experience.
Bloodfire Bloodfire
Rebecca Goldstein always holds your attention.
Jugami Jugami
Great book. Really enjoyed it. Couldn't put it down
Fearlessdweller Fearlessdweller
Rebecca Goldstein write novels of philosophy, where a question takes the central role more than any of the characters. The question I see in this novel is not only the role of luck (mazel) in history, which might also be called the role of chance or Fortune, but a more specific question of what Jews must do to survive. This latter question, whose answer seemed clear up until the Enlightenment and then became a major debate in the early 20th-century Warsaw described in Mazel, was suspended by Jews coming to this country for many decades, but seems in the 21st century to become paramount for Jews again. The Bridegroom story that runs through the book, as well as the brief cautionary tale of the Vilna Troupe, thrust forward this these. But the philosophical basis for the novel doesn't get in the way of presenting multi-dimensional, engaging characters, including the mysterious Fraydel, whom it would be nice to have seen more of. But I did feel that the 21st-century parts of the novel were weaker, with even the shared character of Sasha becoming less interesting as she ages. These parts contain less magic and more explanations. The part of the book that entranced me was the archetypal but grittily real descriptions of the shtetl and of Warsaw, both so idealized that it was hundreds of pages before one could even determine the precise time of the story.
Morad Morad
This is an intelligently written story of three generations of Jewish women. The major part is given to the Polish born grandmother the flamboyant actress Sasha but the key element in the work is the relationships between the generations. The grandmother abandoned Jewish religious life, the daughter is an introverted classical scholar, and the granddaughter also a professor returns to Jewish religious life.
As Murray Baumgarten parts out in an extended review of the book the narrative - view- point often shifts, and the focus is not so much on one person as on relationships.
The book is interesting and has a 'smartness' about it. The central idea that it is Mazel ( Luck) and not Saychel (Wisdom) that is the main factor in life is elaborated through comparison with Hume's famous analysis showing our ordinary conception of 'causation' in life cannot be proven. i.e. there is not the connection of events which is simple, direct causation but rather their conjoining. Goldstein seems to suggest that this means that Life goes more randomly than lovers of planning and order would like to suggest. My own thought is that this is a bit simplistic, and that a lot depends in life on the 'saychel' we have in dealing with our own 'mazel' and that 'mazel ' too may come of 'saychel'.
Gom Gom
This is the 4th book I have read of Rebecca Goldstein's, and this was my 2nd favorite (after the superb Mind-Body Problem). I liked the "generational" aspect where we follow Sasha (Sorel) from early childhood in a Schluftchev shtetl to present day USA where she has a grown daughter (Chloe) and a granddaughter just about to get married (Phoebe). I must admit I enjoyed the early childhood and early adult descriptions of Sasha the best - here there is a rich sense of storytelling, and the human characterizations are gripping and vivid. Sasha evetually rejects and leaves behind the old-fashioned Jewish ways of the shtetl and becomes a great stage actress and part of the Jewish intellectual life ("The Enlightenment") in prewar Warsaw.

The story in the present is also good, but I thought Sasha's antics were described with too much cliche and suffered a bit from the "feminine-writer syndrome". In addition, the daughter and granddaughter stay very one-dimensional. Mazel means LUCK in Yiddish, and this book very successfully plays with its meaning throughout someone's life. Finally, Phoebe's decision about going back to traditional Jewish ways is one of the best contrasts in the story...perfectly unimaginable and understandable at the same time!
Vut Vut
Yes, "Mazel" is too much fun, and too many friends of mine have asked if I have seen it, for it to also to have so much weighty significance.
(I refer here not to the author's occasional didactic between "mazel, luck" and "sekhel, logic that adds charm and the occasional diversion, and even, its own dimension of depth.)
This is a book about three generations of Jewish women, the first of whom fled the shtetl (so much for Anatevka) for Warsaw, where she becomes a theatre star. So, already icons are crashing as a modern American writer presents pre-Holocaust Warsaw as a good place, as a center of culture, as an exciting place. The next generation is the single mother, followed by the granddaughter, a mathematician, who ends up in a new Jewish shtetl in New Jersey.
The freedom with which these themes are woven not just into good storytelling, but good storytelling that ignores lines and limits that have defined Jewish writing since the Holocaust is intensely refreshing. True, it wouldn't have worked if the story wasn't so good, but would even such a good story have been so good if the author were not treading beyond former limits?
I wish I knew more about the author and her other books.