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eBook Oscar Caliber Gun ePub

eBook Oscar Caliber Gun ePub

by Henry Baum

  • ISBN: 1887128212
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Henry Baum
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Soft Skull Press; 2 edition (June 29, 2001)
  • Pages: 189
  • ePub book: 1934 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1215 kb
  • Other: mbr azw doc txt
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 281

Description

His book Oscar Caliber Gun (Later called The Golden Calf) has been translated into French.

His book Oscar Caliber Gun (Later called The Golden Calf) has been translated into French. He has also published work with Identity Theory, Storyglossia, Scarecrow, Dogmatika, Purple prose, 3:AM Magazine, and Les Episodes. His book, The American Book Of The Dead was described by the widow of Philip K Dick, Tessa Dick, "If you read Lolita or A Clockwork Orange without drop-kicking the book out into the garden on a rainy day, this novel.

Henry Baum's Oscar Caliber Gun is a teriffic insight into the mind of a psycho - who goes too far (or does he?). The story is told from the perspective of Ray, who is a disgruntaled 20-something that bounces from job-to-job, tionship and is fed up with the celebrity driven culture that we live in. It follows Ray's actions, as he slowly downspirals and his behavior becomes more and more dangerous to himself and others.

Henry Baum is an American writer, blogger and musician and is considered part of the Rebel Incorporated. Baum is the author of five novels and several published short stories and prose. His book Oscar Caliber Gun (Later called The Golden Calf) has been translated into French. He has also published work with Identity Theory, Storyglossia, Scarecrow, Dogmatika, Purple prose, 3:Department of Administration and Management Magazine, and Les Episodes. rnHis book, The American Book Of The Dead was described by the widow of Philip K Dick, Tessa Dick, "If you read Lolita or A Clockwork Orange without drop-kicking the book out into the garden on a rainy.

Oscar Caliber Gun book. If I’m truthful I can’t see Baum troubling the best seller lists with this type of book, as I don’t believe it has mass appeal. Who wants to spend time reading about inadequacy and low self-esteem, apart from me? Interesting and enjoyable and it made a change from the norm.

Henry Baum is the founder of Kwill and SPR, and has been a novelist for 25 years. His first book, Oscar Caliber Gun, a tight Hollywood crime novel, is now out on Kwill with a new cover for the 25th Anniversary of its publication

Henry Baum is the founder of Kwill and SPR, and has been a novelist for 25 years. His first book, Oscar Caliber Gun, a tight Hollywood crime novel, is now out on Kwill with a new cover for the 25th Anniversary of its publication.

First written when SPR founder Henry Baum was only 19 years old, living in LA as a child of Hollywood movie professionals, this novel is now re-released, in time for The Oscars, with a new cover and in Kindle format, and captures.

First written when SPR founder Henry Baum was only 19 years old, living in LA as a child of Hollywood movie professionals, this novel is now re-released, in time for The Oscars, with a new cover and in Kindle format, and captures the male angst of living in the City of Dreams, faced with oblivion and little hope of making it.  . A marvel of pace and comic timin.Much of Baum’s narrative bears a similarity to Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground. With a superb narrative control, Baum paints a portrait of male dysfunction set to explode.

Oscar Caliber Gun. Previously released as The Golden Calf by Another Sky Press and Rebel Inc. (UK), Je suis du bon côté by Hachette Littératures (France), and Oscar Caliber Gun by Soft Skull Press. Hollywood celebrity stalker Ray Tompkins prowls the underbelly of Los Angeles, his new target is A-List Movie Actor Tim Griffith, and Ray’s going to see this one through to the star-studded murderous end. A tight-paced, satirical thriller set in a seamy Californian hell

Published June 29, 2001 by Soft Skull Press.

Fiction. Ray's story combines the sacrificial moral compass of Travis Bickle with a bloodied but unbowed Bukowskian will. His anger builds like the heat of the L.A. summer, until he discovers a way to react undwarfed by the size of his rage. "I wouldn't exactly call myself a fan. But if being a fan means applauding shallowness, being out-of-touch with the real world, looking pretty for money, being unaware of the hearts that are broken across the globe, well then, sir, I am your number one fan." (from God Doesn't Drive a Limousine). "OSCAR CALIBER GUN explores the hazy junction where the teeth of the daily grind sink into the day-dreamt certainties of life's true bell-head sounds." (Lee Ranaldo, of Sonic Youth, author of ROAD MOVIES).

Comments

Swordsong Swordsong
This book was strong from the very first page. Ray Tompkins starts out garnering your sympathy, until you find that this warehouse worker is no simple soul. Just as you start to feel sorry for him, you realize that he is the type of man that no one will ever understand, not even his family. A loner, Tompkins moves aimlessly through life, moving from dead-end job to dead-end job with no prospect in sight.

In short, Tompkins has little people skills and just as much self-esteem. The book follows Tompkins downward trajectory into a path of despair and ultimate destruction, not only of himself but also others. As he flits from meaningless relationship to relationship, Tompkins seemed destined to live and die in mediocre obscurity. Riled by bitterness, he allows the darkness to take over. Through his discovered love of letter writing, Tompkins pens his letters to those he wants to get to know a little more intimately.

Whether you like it or not, by the end of the book, you will feel drawn to Tompkins and other characters through the skillful descriptive writing of Baum. The reader may wonder if what happened to Tompkins on his way down could happen to them. It shows the psychotic mind of a mad man who has descended into the darkest dungeon and pure evil. His disdain of celebrity culture and the Hollywood lure is all too real. Once he zeroed in on Hollywood’s golden boy, Tim Griffith, there is no turning back or is there!

The second half of Oscar Caliber Gun may not have been as strong as the first, but you will still enjoy the read. Overall, Henry Baum has done a great job with Oscar Caliber Gun. One of the appeals of this book is that it is not a run-of-the-mill story. While necessarily everyone’s cup of tea, it is worthwhile giving Baum’s Oscar Caliber Gun a try.
Dugor Dugor
“Oscar Caliber Gun: 25th Anniversary Edition” can be read on at least two levels. On the surface, this is a can’t-put-it-down amazing horror adventure, a barn-burner of a read, exciting, fun, and very, very scary. It will keep you flipping the pages so fast you might generate sparks. (I recommend reading with a glass or bottle of non-alcoholic liquid near to hand)
I read it, devoured it, in two days. The pacing is perfect and the occasional humor makes for a very enjoyable read. The story itself is very compelling, and the many twists and turns in the plot are quite shocking. The characters are believable and likeable, and the situations in which they find themselves never seem to let up, all the way to the ending. I'm not going to discuss anything about the plot, you can read the synopsis. But keep this in mind: the synopsis only covers a miniscule amount of the intensity of this book. Also keep in mind, this book will hit you over and over and over heart-wrenchingly deep in the feels.
I really did like this book. The book is long but I never felt that it faltered. It is a great story with masses of action and pages which practically turn themselves. I loved it. I think it’s worth a read even if this isn’t your usual genre.
Browelali Browelali
A poignantly cynical yet believable journey from world-weary mundanity into the confusing clarity of madness, Oscar Caliber Gun surprised me by being one of the few books I've read lately that was truly difficult to put down.

The writing style, heavily reliant on Hemingway-esque short, declarative sentences, is highly readable and quickly draws the reader into the world of a young man struggling through life as a directionless nobody in 1990s Los Angeles. And while the broad narrative arc of the story showed itself fairly early, Baum's attention to detail in laying out the character, life, and motivations of the wonderfully complex protagonist gave the story a compelling edge that never stopped pulling me along toward the last page. Without giving much away, I can honestly say that the conclusion of Ray's character arc—and its irony—left me surprised but satisfied.

I highly recommend this book.
Frey Frey
Los Angeles author Henry Baum has published four novels - The Golden Calf, God’s Wife, North of Sunset, and The American Book of the Dead – as well as publishing work with Identity Theory, Storyglossia, Scarecrow, Dogmatika, Purple Prose, 3:AM, Les Episodes, and others. Henry is also a recorded music composer and singer and for that aspect of his artistic he uses the name Ash Tree. And as he states ‘Ash Tree is a solo music project – I play and record everything myself. The name is derived from my own name – H. sounds like “Ash” in French, and Baum means “Tree” in German.’ The initial version of OSCAR CALIBER GUN was published as The Golden Calf in 1999: OSCAR CALIBER GUN is the second and 25th anniversary edition.

Henry’s style of writing is true grit. He flavors his tale with strange asides and back stories and introduces characters, at times only momentarily, who add to the atmosphere of the California seamy side. Yet while his main character appears to be the very face of male dysfunction, he manages to keep a dollop of dark humor to lighten the pages.

For example, an excerpt from the book reads as follows: ‘Ugly women knew what it was like to live. Pretty women didn't know anything about real life. They'd been looked at too long. Imagine, you're a mannequin, people staring at you your whole life, telling you how good you look and that's all that matters. You can't tell me that they know what it's like to really be alive. The uglier women had to rely on something other than their face. So I felt something for them. And I was no one to complain. I wasn't all that pretty myself. And I hadn't had sex in over a year. I wasn't afraid to admit it.’

The synopsis offers some insight into the range of the story: ‘‘Ray Tompkins is the kind of person you never get to know. He's the security guard, the factory worker, the man working the midnight shift. Nobody really understands Ray - not his coworkers, not his family, and certainly not the women in his life. There is a rage building inside Ray Tompkins and Los Angeles is the fuel - the sick obsession with celebrity mixed with the vacuousness of everyday life. Against this backdrop, Ray Tompkins finds a way to vent his anger. He, too, will be known as the Hollywood celebrity stalker who prowls the underbelly of Los Angeles, his new target is A-List Movie Actor Tim Griffith, and Ray's going to see this one through to the star-studded murderous end.’

Ray tells us his perception of his life: ‘I learned today that I wasn't going to be anything. I was twenty-eight years old. I was reading about the Beatles today on the way to work. I got this encyclopedia that's supposed to have every fact about them. By the time those guys were twenty-eight they had done just about everything. They had changed the world. And they did something good. I watched other celebrities, like movie stars, and they had an air about them like they ruled the world. Now, I wasn't against success. I would have loved some of it. Some real world-changing success. What I didn't like was the no-talents or the almost-talents swallowing up success like a junkie to drugs and then being rewarded for it. They were young and over-proud. I myself was twenty-eight years old. And that didn't mean a thing to anybody but me. I worked in a warehouse. Somebody had to. Behind everything, there was people. They might have been happy people, sad people, rich people, or people who wanted to kill, but nothing worked by itself. When you walked outside and you saw the buildings, the streetlights, the trash on the street, you thought that it was a given, that was just the way things were. But that wasn't the case. The stuff had to be made by somebody. The M & M wrapper lying on the sidewalk had to be designed by some professional, then approved by someone higher, and then sealed up by a machine. People like me ran those machines. People like me somewhere else made those machines, and people somewhere else made the screws for the machines. There was a little life lesson for you. Things didn't make themselves. It was all made by people who had stuff on their minds. I supposed that was the meaning of life right there. There was something behind everything. And behind that there's something else, down to the last atom. And nothing could ever be figured out because you keep going backward. You halve an atom, you just get half an atom. You halve that, you get a quarter, and so on. There was no way of figuring out what's behind it, what's behind anything.’

Happy 25th Anniversary to this very entertaining and significant novel! Grady Harp, June 16