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eBook MERCY: A NOVEL ePub

eBook MERCY: A NOVEL ePub

by Alissa York

  • ISBN: 1883285259
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Alissa York
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Delphinium (November 3, 2004)
  • Pages: 323
  • ePub book: 1784 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1186 kb
  • Other: txt docx lit azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 820

Description

Alissa York's highly acclaimed first novel, Mercy, was published in 2003. She won the Mary Scorer Award for Best Book by a Manitoba Publisher for her short story collection, Any Given Power

Alissa York's highly acclaimed first novel, Mercy, was published in 2003. She won the Mary Scorer Award for Best Book by a Manitoba Publisher for her short story collection, Any Given Power. Her stories have also won the Journey Prize and the Bronwen Wallace Award, and in 2001 she won the John Hirsch Award for Most Promising Manitoba Writer. She has lived all over Canada, and now makes her home in Toronto.

by ALISSA YORK Bookperk is a promotional service of HarperCollins Publishers, 195 Broadway, New York, NY 10007, providing information about the products of HarperCollins and it. .

Bookperk is a promotional service of HarperCollins Publishers, 195 Broadway, New York, NY 10007, providing information about the products of HarperCollins and its affiliates.

York has written four novels: Mercy, Effigy, Fauna and The Naturalist, and a book of short stories, Any Given Power, which . "Literary award means time to do what she loves: Winnipeg author Alissa York wins the Journey Prize". National Post, October 21, 1999

York has written four novels: Mercy, Effigy, Fauna and The Naturalist, and a book of short stories, Any Given Power, which won the Journey Prize in 1999 for the short story The Back of the Bear's Mouth. National Post, October 21, 1999. "2007 Nominations for the Scotiabank Giller Prize".

Her first novel, Mercy, published by Random House Canada in 2003, was a C Born in 1970, Alissa York has lived all over Canada and now makes her home in Toronto with her husband, writer/filmmaker Clive Holden. York's award-winning short fiction has appeared in various literary journals and anthologies, and in the collection, Any Given Power, published by Arbeiter Ring Publishing in 1999.

ISBN 10: 1883285259 ISBN 13: 9781883285258. Publisher: Delphinium, 2004.

From New York Times bestselling author Mariah Stewart comes a novel of sexy romantic suspense for fans of Nora . I like that the people and their story carried through in this book from the first.

From New York Times bestselling author Mariah Stewart comes a novel of sexy romantic suspense for fans of Nora Roberts.

Award-winning author Alissa York’s first novel is a haunting and masterful exploration of how passions of the spirit and the flesh can overwhelm us, and even come to inhabit the ground beneath our feet. Divided into two parts, Mercy pairs a single year in the past with a single night in the present, as they unfold in the town of Mercy, Manitoba, and in the neighbouring black spruce bog.

Just as that novel brought us a brilliant Hell that only he could imagine, Doomed is a dark and twisted .

Just as that novel brought us a brilliant Hell that only he could imagine, Doomed is a dark and twisted apocalyptic vision from this provocative storyteller. 4. Fight Club In his debut novel, Chuck Palahniuk showed himself to be his generation's most visionary satirist. Fight Club's estranged narrator leaves his lackluster job when he comes under the thrall of Tyler Durden, an enigmatic young man who holds secret boxing matches in the basement of bars. Показать полность. iction 01. Literary award means time to do what she loves: Winnipeg author Alissa York wins the Journey Prize".

York has written four novels: Mercy, Effigy, Fauna and The Naturalist, and a book of short stories, Any Given Power, which won the Journey Prize in 1999 for the short story The Back of the Bear's Mouth. Mercy captures the separate love affairs two priests become involved in spanning over 50 years in a small town in Manitoba.

Alissa York (born 1970) is a Canadian writer and the 1999 winner of the Bronwen Wallace Memorial Award

Alissa York (born 1970) is a Canadian writer and the 1999 winner of the Bronwen Wallace Memorial Award. She lived in Winnipeg, Manitoba before settling in Toronto with her lisher husband Clive Holden. York has written four novels: Mercy, Effigy, Fauna and The Naturalist, and a book of short stories, Any Given Power, which won the Journey Prize in 1999 for the short story The Back of the Bear's Mouth.

In 1948, August Day, a young priest, becomes involved in a secret affair with a butcher's wife and, fifty years later, a widowed preacher comes to the same town and meets a woman who lives secretly in the bog.

Comments

Braswyn Braswyn
...the combination falling short of a good novel.

This is not your usual novel. It's a solid representation of the 'CanLit' genre. Regardless of whether it rambles, or is confusing, it's a solid effort by a gifted writer. It's not for everyone. And it's not the best story ever told. There were times when I wished that the author had approached things in a more 'commercial fiction' way, but each time I'd remind myself that 'Mercy' was never intended to be a tale told that way.

Yes, there were aspects of the story that were never resolved. Yes, I'm still not sure how everything is tied to gather, that the characters and their plots were clearly mapped out. But I sensed that 'Mercy' was told pretty much exactly the way Ms York had intended, and for this reason alone, I salute her.

As a footnote, there were lovely bits and pieces presented quite regularly that had me smiling at their execution as much as I was frowning because she'd said something that I, as a writer, wished I'd said myself, and would be forever be incapable of expressing as nicely in my own way.
Nikojas Nikojas
Mercy was an unusual book. The writing was haunting and the story was heartbreaking. The utter devotion of Father Day to his beliefs and the way his feelings for Mathilda destroy him, both physically and spiritually, provide the center of the story in the first half of the book. The author also gives us a window into the mind of Thomas, Mathilda's husband. He seems oafish at first, but develops into a character that is just as trapped and full of longing as Father Day and Mathilda. The lives of these three people are emotionally tortured and close in around them until the entire situation culminates in a very dramatic way.

The second half of the book left me feeling a little lost. Fifty years have gone by and now the town of Mercy has changed. We meet a corrupt preacher with an autistic daughter whose life is essentially one affair after another. His desire to to develop the bogs put him in contact with Bog Mary, who he must rely on for help when he is injured. His character is connected to the people in the beginning of the book, but I just didn't feel the same way about the second half as I did about the first. We really got to know Mathilda, Thomas and Father Day through the minutia of their days, but this didn't continue in the second half of the book. I felt like the characters were just as interesting, but not as well developed

The arrangement of short chapters and the ideas of religion, morality and devotion were weaved into the story in a unique way. The second half weakened it and I regret that the momentum didn't continue throughout the entire book.
Thohelm Thohelm
This was a very literary type story that unfortunately seemed to ramble about with no distinct plot. The book was divided into two sections, which seemed to be very different stories with few overlapping connections.

The ending left me confused, There was no real conclusion and a lot of questions were left unanswered.

I was surprised at the amount of sexual references and overtones in the book. It was a little jarring and unexpected. For such a discreet time period with puritanical characters, sex played a large role in the book.

Overall, the story was not what I was expecting, and I was felt feeling unsatisfied.
Dugor Dugor
This has GOT to be the strangest book I've ever read. It was hard to follow with all the sections pulled up from the past. I think it would have been a better story if some attention had been given to the night Mathilda gave birth. Was the priest ever found? What did Thomas do about the disappearance of his wife? Instead fast forward 44 years and try to sort out the new cast of characters. The ending was just chopped off, gave no conclusion to the story at all.
I don't think I'll read any more by this author, too many other good ones on my list.
salivan salivan
My guess is that the author had two different ideas for the same rural Manitoba setting and tried to tie them together. The result isn't wholly successful. The first part, which takes place in the late 1940s, is strong. The characters are convincing and compelling, and even though the writing suffers a little from the overly self-conscious literary style that seems to bedevil so much Canadian fiction, I was drawn into the story. I wish I could say the same for the second part, which takes place in the 1990s. There's a very forced quality to the characterization and the situation. The disbelief I had willingly suspended for the melodrama of the first part came crashing down. My suggestion to readers would be to read Mercy for the first part alone and consider it to be a reasonably accomplished novella.
Ueledavi Ueledavi
Leaves a lot of questions unanswered, without any clear focus of what you are to take from it. Started interestingly enough, but didn't develop well and second half was a huge question mark.