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eBook Imaginings of Sand ePub

eBook Imaginings of Sand ePub

by Andre Brink

  • ISBN: 043620259X
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Andre Brink
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harcourt Brace.; 1st edition (1996)
  • ePub book: 1707 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1885 kb
  • Other: docx txt lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 670

Description

André Brink is the author of several novels in English, including A Dry White Season, Imaginings of. .you fall from your body to your shadow not there but in my eyes. in a motionless fall of cascade sky and earth join.

André Brink is the author of several novels in English, including A Dry White Season, Imaginings of Sand, The Rights of Desire and The Other Side of Silence. He has won South Africa’s most important literary prize, the CNA Award, three times and has twice been shortlisted for the Booker Prize.

Imaginings of Sand is a South African novel by André Brink, published in 1996. The author wrote the book in Afrikaans and in English. It is set in South Africa at the time of the first democratic elections. It is set in South Africa at the time of the first democratic elections

Andre Brink (1935 - 2015) was one of South Africa's most prominent writers and is the author of several novels, including A Dry White Season, Imaginings of Sand, The Rights of Desire, The Other Side of Silence and Philida

Andre Brink (1935 - 2015) was one of South Africa's most prominent writers and is the author of several novels, including A Dry White Season, Imaginings of Sand, The Rights of Desire, The Other Side of Silence and Philida. He has won South Africa's most important literay prize, the CNA Award, three times and has twice been shortlisted for the Booker Prize.

Imaginings of Sand book. So André Brink has died. I arranged a workshop with him in Stavanger in the nineites, and I dared to compare his landscape wirting to Wilbur Smith's. I shouldn't have done that. For most people Brink's most important book was Dry White Season, but for me none of them beat Imaginings of Sand. I consider it one of the five best books I've ever read.

Imaginings of Sand (1996). André Brink at the Internet Book List. André Brink on Books LIVE. Devil's Valley (1998). The Rights of Desire (2000). Translingual writers reflect on their craft. Hope, Christopher (31 January 2009). Traitor to the Tribe".

The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far.

by. Brink, André Philippus, 1935-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on August 25, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

To get the most out of this book keep track of the way the characters in Ouma's myth-like stories connect with the main plot. Find similar books Profile. It is already a week since I arrived. So much has happened, nothing has happened. An existence in suspense somehow, in which, curiously, Ouma's stories seem almost more real than the events surrounding me - even though I'm not altogether sure why she has felt this urgency to tell all before she dies.

THE BOOK: A narrative counterpoint between to women, two South Africas. The year is 1749, when the Boers ruled South Africa

THE BOOK: A narrative counterpoint between to women, two South Africas. Kristien Muller returns from London to her homeland to fulfil a promise. Her grandmother lies on her deathbed unleashing a turmult of myth, legend and brute fact. The year is 1749, when the Boers ruled South Africa.

Download Now. saveSave Andre Brink Imaginings of Sand For Later

Download Now. saveSave Andre Brink Imaginings of Sand For Later. Andre Brink Imaginings of Sand. Uploaded by. Manilia. Paradoxically, even Kristien's sister, Anna's choice towards the end of the book's narrative to kill herself and wipe out her whole family can be seen as yet another form of assertion of women's rights addressed by Brink's novel. Entrapped in an oppressive marriage, her husband personifying the male chauvinistic tyrant, reduced to the roles of housewife and mother, Anna is disallowed a voice of her own and feels deprived of right to make decisions concerning her life.

Imaginings of Sand

Comments

Netlandinhabitant Netlandinhabitant
I very much enjoyed the author's "Dry White Season", so I expected an entirely different type of story. I was looking for more of a political approach with emphasis on the struggle to establish a new regime under the ANC. I do not like magical realism, which made up a significant aspect of the novel. I would not have purchased the book had I known it was of that nature.
Villo Villo
Setting
Axebourne Axebourne
Under the guise of telling the story of nine generations of women, the reader is subjected to one more male fantasy about the sexual life of women. The "heroine" and her female ancestors have no value other than their sexual use. Does a single woman in this book write anything? NO! Build anything? NO. Work for anything except a secondary role in society? NO! The main character is defined by her willingness to be used as a sexual release for Important Men and when she gets pregnant--within marriage--she opts for an abortion in a pique of selfishness and vengefulness. Her sister likewise represents stifling life by being a mass murderer--a role so far removed from reality as to be a further slap in the face to the life-affirming aspect of being female. Frankly, the book disgusted me. After one-third of the way through it I was able to predict which sexual fantasy would come next, window-dressed as "this is how women really are." Beneath a very thin patina of trying to "be female" the author reveals a scorn for women seldom encountered in contemporary writers. Don't waste your time--read "A Thousand Splendid Suns" instead.
Abywis Abywis
Imaginings Of Sand by André Brink was a second novel I recently encountered where an old woman, close to death, related a life story. The book's central character is Ouma Kristina, an unconventional Afrikaner lady, bed-ridden and severely burned after her house was torched by raiders. André Brink has her relate a family history to her near-namesake granddaughter, a modern, independently-minded thirty-something, and in her own time and way also unconventional. She seems to have broken free from her past, perhaps even rejected it, has lived in London and has even joined the African National Congress. Through her grandmother's stories, the younger Kristien rediscovers her heritage, her family history and via that her people's history. It's a long story and is delivered, eventually, directly from the coffin. While Sebastian Barry's heroine in Secret Scriptures relates a purely personal tale from her deathbed, André Brink's Ouma Kristina tells not only her own story, but also that of the family ancestors, and always via a matriarchal lineage. It's the women that make the history, and that history reflects the story of an entire people, spanning two centuries. In both books, the scenarios lack credibility, but equally, once suspension of belief has been achieved, both work beautifully as literary mechanisms. In Brink's novel, however, Ouma Kristina's project is much bigger than telling her own story and eventually it even begins to illustrate how myth can create history and vice versa. Not bad for an old lady burnt to a cinder!

Imaginings Of Sand is also for me a third recent novel examining the fears, hopes and realities surrounding South Africa's transition to legitimate statehood in the 1990s. Nadine Gordimer's July's People dealt mainly with imagined fears alongside valued relationships, whereas J M Coetzee's Disgrace encountered messy reality. André Brink's project in his novel is both more ambitious and more mundane, and it is also more successful. It concentrates on one family and its history, but it's a history that mirrors that of the Afrikaner people. Young Kristien, newly returned from London where she lived a life that was perfectly inconceivable for her grandmother, her parents and even her own sister, learns much and understands more from her grandmother's stories. We sense the widening perspective that she sees. We feel the character grow.

Of course, the contemporary family also has its current issues. Caspar, husband of Kristien's elder sister is a rampant Boer, a boer and a boor. He figures significantly in the book's denouement, acted out as the old woman predictably and eventually expires, South Africa elects a new government and Kristien, herself, makes a decision she would not have thought possible just weeks before. The subtlety of Imaginings Of Sand lie in how André Brink uses the family dispute as a metaphor for what is feared in the wider society. Suffice it to say that after a period of oppression and exploitation, it is possible that the repressed, guilt-ridden middle ground is the most likely source of over-reaction.

The family's history related by the dying grandmother might occasionally stray into too much detail, and sometimes the fantasy, the myth that André Brink seeks to introduce through their embroidery, might seem a tad false or confused. But then that's myth, isn't it? But Imaginings Of Sand is as close to a masterpiece of fiction as anything I have read in many years. Its successes are on many levels, across a multitude of parallel themes. It's a historical novel. It's a political novel. It enacts a subtly-constructed psychological drama. It also, ambitiously, sees everything from a female standpoint, thus binding both the reality and the myth of regeneration and reproduction into the fabric of the story. The book is thus a novel that demands to be read by anyone with an interest in Africa, South Africa in particular, history, politics, psychology, women or merely people. And it you don't fall into any of these categories, read it anyway! It's a masterpiece.
Bolv Bolv
I could hardly be able to have any breaks in reading before I was finished with the book! The same thing happened to me with Brink's "Devil's Valley". I really enjoy his stories!