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eBook Daughters of Jerusalem ePub

eBook Daughters of Jerusalem ePub

by Charlotte Mendelson

  • ISBN: 0330482777
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Charlotte Mendelson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Picador (February 21, 2003)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1826 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1504 kb
  • Other: lit mobi rtf lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 342

Description

Charlotte Mendelson was born in 1972 and grew up in Oxford. Her first short story was published in New Writing 7 and broadcast on Radio 4. Daughters of Jerusalem is her second novel. She lives in London with her family.

Charlotte Mendelson was born in 1972 and grew up in Oxford.

Daughters of Jerusalem book. The most fascinating theme in this book is that how yo Charlotte Mendelson seems to specialize in writing about dysfunctional families. And boy, did she ever pick a dysfunctional one for this novel. I can't even begin to say what all isn't working right for the Lux family. The father lives in his head, the mother seems totally lost, the teenage daughters can't stand each other, which I guess is in the range of normal, but the degree in which they make each others' lives miserable certainly is not.

Daughters of Jerusalem, Charlotte’s second novel, is set in North Oxford, where she grew up. Here, in the Lux family, trouble stirs

Daughters of Jerusalem, Charlotte’s second novel, is set in North Oxford, where she grew up. Here, in the Lux family, trouble stirs. Eve, the elder daughter, is seething with loathing for her charismatic sister Phoebe; meanwhile, their mother's best friend, Helena, is about to make a startling confession. This is Oxford, where cleverness is all, and secret love, and secret hatred, must be repressed. But repression never works for long

Mendelson's own prose is suffused with longing, studded with recherché words and clotted with gastronomic . Perhaps because the evocation of desire is so strong, the ending of Daughters of Jerusalem never quite fulfils the promise of its beginning

Mendelson's own prose is suffused with longing, studded with recherché words and clotted with gastronomic metaphors which make you feel that you should be reading on a chaise longue, stuffing yourself with violet creams. Some of her images are truly startling, particularly when her characters wax romantic. Perhaps because the evocation of desire is so strong, the ending of Daughters of Jerusalem never quite fulfils the promise of its beginning. But at her best, Mendelson has a Rosamond Lehmannesque facility with what Hermione Lee recently dubbed Doomed Chick Lit. Topics.

Daughters of Jerusalem. Beautifully written and very funny, Daughters of Jerusalem is a gripping tale of hidden love and hate, of the desire to belong and the need for escape

Daughters of Jerusalem. Beautifully written and very funny, Daughters of Jerusalem is a gripping tale of hidden love and hate, of the desire to belong and the need for escape. Daughters of Jerusalem won both the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and a Somerset Maugham Award. Mendelson’s second bewitchingly erotic and darkly dramatic novel confirms her as a stylish, perceptive chronicler of the heart’s hidden desires’ Daily Mail. Books by Charlotte Mendelson.

She was placed 60th on the Independent on Sunday Pink List 2007. Love in Idleness (2001). Daughters of Jerusalem (2003). When We Were Bad (2007). Almost English (2013). John Llewellyn Rhys Prize. Somerset Maugham Award. Sunday Times 'Young Writer of the Year (shortlisted). London Arts New London Writers’ Award. K. Blundell Trust Award. Le Prince Maurice Roman d’Amour Prize (shortlisted). Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize (shortlisted).

Unofficial fan page for the author Charlotte Mendelson. For Books' Sake's top ten reasons to love Charlotte Mendelson, author of Almost English, When We Were Bad, Love in Idleness and Daughters of Jerusalem. 4 November 2013 ·. Charlotte Mendelson has been nominated for 'Writer of the Year' in the Stonewall Awards being held this Thursday! Do you think she could win? She's up against some fierce competition: James Wharton, Neil McKenna, . Collins and Damian Barr.

Charlotte Mendelson at Walmart. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12. Qty

She is sick of this - the sooty castles of the Banbury Road . . . She is sick of navy-blue corduroy, Gothic arches, famous fig trees, shabby dons' wives, cellars, rivers, genius children, stuttering and gold leaf. It is your fault, she thinks, approaching her husband's college, as she glimpses her neighbour, an entirely silent botanist, attempting to untangle his own beard from a hawthorn tree. None of you are normal. Is normal. And I am.In a shabby, book-choked house in North Oxford live the Lux family. Victor, a dedicated professor, is desperate to be elected to give the prestigious annual Spenser lecture. Jean, his unassuming wife, is tentatively experimenting with the boundaries of her marital freedom. Eve, an over-achiever like her father, is suffering from a dangerous teenage angst - straining to achieve top marks in her exams and yet always in the shadow of her younger sister, Pheobe, who is perfect, it seems.Into this climate of repression and bitterness there comes an unworldly don, Victor's b?te-noir, who shows interest in the vulnerable Eve. Meanwhile, Jean's best friend, Helen, has something she is yearning to tell: a confession that may alter everyone's constrainingly absurd life for ever.Daughters of Jerusalem is a captivating tale of hidden love and secret hatred, of the desire to belong and the need for escape, and of the fine line between wanting to be discovered and fearing the consequences when the delicious unknown becomes brutally exposed . . .

Comments

Tori Texer Tori Texer
First, the official plot description above is actually not for this book. This novel is, in part, about the relationship between two sisters, but they are not twins, and there is no boy who comes between them. Really, it's a story about a family, akin to "Bee Season," where relationships and favoritism intertwine, and secrets grow.

It also happens to contain one of the most vivid and subtle depictions of a formerly heterosexual woman embarking on a lesbian affair. In wonderfully realistic yet spare psychological detail, the novel goes through that emotional journey from friendship to revelation to initial disgust to less-than-platonic moments to full-blown love affair. Given the dearth of well-written lesbian fiction out there, this novel is a must-read.
mr.Mine mr.Mine
The novel is set in academic Oxford, where the male dons pursue the most obscure studies and are generally a scruffy, pedantic and absent-minded lot, while their wives or female colleagues are dowdy. One of the dons is Victor Lux: of refugee origin, now a Fellow of St James' College, whose field is ancient civilizations. He is sunk in his work and unobservant of his family, inarticulate except when he holds forth on some area of his subject. (Actually several of the other characters are inarticulate as well; frequently the dialogues are full of unfinished sentences, beating around the bush in embarrassment and/or with suppressed emotions.) Victor is insecure, and dreads the possibility that a hated former fellow-student and competitor of years ago, Raymond Snow, might be appointed to a vacant Fellowship at his college; and he is devastated when it happens. And Raymond Snow is indeed a silky and evil monster.

Victor's wife Jean, twenty years his junior, feels stifled at home and has a dreary job cataloguing the archives at St Thomas' College. She has one good friend, Helena Potter, a don at All Saints' College, whose specialism is insects - but this friendship is uncomfortable (to put it mildly) and full of problems.

The Luxes have two daughters. The elder, aged 16, is Eve, unattractive and clever (but, in her own opinion, not clever enough), and unappreciated by her parents. The younger one, Phoebe, aged 13, is prettier, unacademic, aggressively rumbustious, wilful, endlessly demanding, manipulative, malicious, extravagantly badly behaved, and yet (hard to understand) very much her indulgent mother's favourite, and bitterly and impotently resented by Eve. Whenever the sisters quarrel, their mother sides with Phoebe, and Eve is driven into paroxysms of masochism. She will escape for a while from her misery into happiness, only to be ensnared in exploitation and more misery.

Jean, Eve and Phoebe are full of dangerous secrets. Only Victor, preoccupied with his books and his agony over Raymond, hadn't a clue, until they all unravel horribly in his presence. One wonders then how the novel can end in anything but utter tragedy. Very likely for Victor, despite a belated triumph over Snow, it is: that is left hanging in the air. For Jane there is some kind of resolution, and for Eve and Phoebe the ending is quite unexpected.

It is a book full of passion and drama, its tensions emphasized by the use the Historic Present throughout. Brilliantly written, tragedy humorously but not unfeelingly described, and a real page-turner.
Enditaling Enditaling
From the book cover:
Behind the crumbling facade of seeming normality, secrets begin to stir within the Lux family home. Jean Lux, constrained academic wife and guilty mother, is waiting for excitement - and it will come from an unexpected source. Meanwhile Eve, her intelligent elder daughter, luxuriates in wounded jealousy, until her loathing for her only sister verges on the murderous. Into this repression and bitterness enters Raymond Snow, who begins to show interest in the vulnerable Eve. Meanwhile, Jean's best friend, Helena, has something she is yearning to tell: a confession that may alter everyone's life forever.

"Daughters of Jerusalem" follows during an academic year the Lux family, apparently normal on the surface, but on reality completely dysfunctional. Victor, a history lecturer at Oxford, is obsessed with being chosen for the prestigious Spenser lecture and with his rival fellow lecturer Raymond. Jean, his much younger wife, that passively sees life passing by and then gets involved in a lesbian affair with her best friend Helena. Eve, the self-mutilating intelligent but social inept elder daughter, craves for the love and attention of her parents which is mostly given to her sister, the spoilt and manipulative Phoebe.
In "Daughters of Jerusalem", Charlotte Mendelson wrote an acerbic and humorous picture of Oxford and the academia in the 80s. We have a portrait of all those very intelligent but weird dons, self-centered, competitive and obsessed with things common people don't have any use for and incapable of dealing with everyday things. However, this weirdness and expectations in terms of achievement have a terrible impact on their families, namely their children, and life can be hell. This is a story of love, emotional and sexual self-discovery, but also of jealousy, hatred, pettiness and rivalry. Through her changing perspective and detailed and perceptive writing, Charlotte Mendelson is able to give us three-dimensional and complex characters, but so wrapped in their self-obsessions that they are unable to see what is really happening around them until events finally make them really face each other. An excellent book.