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eBook Crossing The River ePub

eBook Crossing The River ePub

by Caryl Phillips

  • ISBN: 0330333046
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Caryl Phillips
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Picador; New Ed edition (1994)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1751 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1625 kb
  • Other: txt mobi docx doc
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 240

Description

Crossing the River bears eloquently chastened testimony to the shattering of black lives. Caryl Phillips' Booker Prize shortlisted book CROSSING THE RIVER provides welcomed stories about a group of Americans whose stories have too long been untold or ignored.

Crossing the River bears eloquently chastened testimony to the shattering of black lives. Beautifully measured writing that powerfully evokes the far-reaching realities of the African diaspora. If you enjoyed reading CROSSING THE RIVER, I think you would like my novel THE MAN WITH THE SILVER TONGUE, which is also a tale about slavery and human dignity-another story that should have been told years ago. The Man With The Silver Tongue.

Crossing the River is a historical novel by British author Caryl Phillips, published in 1993. The Village Voice calls it "a fearless reimagining of the geography and meaning of the African diaspora. The Boston Globe said, "Crossing the River bears eloquently chastened testimony to the shattering of black lives. Crossing the River is a story about three black people during different time periods and in different continents as they struggle with the separation from their native Africa.

What have I done? I’ve come back to this village with Len, after marriage, after Wales, after being lost. And I’m married now. For nearly a month. s filled with its own self-importance. The only relief I have from this place is when I travel down to see my mother, whose sole occupation in life seems to be to make me feel guilty. A guilt I’m determined to resist. I stare at her as she lies in bed. She’s taken to her bed as a permanent place of refuge

Caryl Phillips was born in St Kitts and now lives in London and New York.

Caryl Phillips was born in St Kitts and now lives in London and New York. He has written for television, radio, theatre and cinema and is the author of three works of non-fiction and seven novels. Crossing the Riverwas shortlisted for the 1993 Booker Prize and he has won the Martin Luther King Memorial Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, as well as being named the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year 1992 and one of the Best of Young British Writers 1993. Библиографические данные.

Crossing the River book. Caryl Phillips can slip you into the head and heart of characters as diverse as the African diaspora, and make you care desperately. These wrenching, beautiful tales are tied by the horror of slavery but travel hundreds of years beyond the official end of that particular plague.

A Booker shortlisted novel by one of the finest writers of his generationA voice speaking out of a distant past, describes the consequences of his desperation: his daughter and two sons are condemned to the hold of an English slave ship bound for America in 1753. Here are the stories of these children: Nash, Martha, and Travis.

From the acclaimed author of Cambridge comes an ambitious, formally inventive, and intensely moving evocation of the scattered offspring of Africa. It begins in a year of failing crops and desperate foolishness, which forces a father to sell his three children into slavery.

Crossing the River Phillips, Caryl Random House (USA) 9780679757948 : From the acclaimed author of Cambridge comes an ambitious, formally inventive, and intensely moving evocation of th.

Crossing the River Phillips, Caryl Random House (USA) 9780679757948 : From the acclaimed author of Cambridge comes an ambitious, formally inventive, and intensely moving evocation of t. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 6 сен 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: начало октября При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

Comments

Umge Umge
I had to read this book for my study abroad program at Oxford. It is honestly one of the best books I've ever read in my life. It takes you through the story of several people so seamlessly and has the most vivid imagery.
NI_Rak NI_Rak
The beauty of the language and the sweep of the narrative make this novel a moving and powerful experience for the reader. Caryl Phillips explores the abandonment and misery of slavery without indicting any of the participants above the rest. In fact, the prologue begins the story with the guilty voice of the father who sells his children to a white slaver out of "a desperate foolishness" when his crops fail. The reader follows the sin and suffering of all of the participants in the slave trade, black and white, and the virtuosity of Caryl Phillips use of language makes the journey both emotional and memorable.
Adaly Adaly
I enjoyed the first story, but I felt rather bored afterwards! I was assigned this text for a postcolonial literature course, and I understand the themes of permanent diaspora, belonging/non-belonging, and communal identity. It didn't help either that the stories change narrators and, I believe it contains four separate stories: Nash Williams (now freed/privileged slave of a Christian man named "Edward), James Hamilton (slave ship owner), Martha (Old slave that receives hospitality from a White Christian woman), lastly, Joyce (a white woman that has an affair with a black military man). (Not in chronological order)

The journal entries written from James perspective were insightful, but very boring. The entries from Joyce's narrative were very dull.

I know Phillips is known for several other works like France: Strangers in a Strange land, but I disliked this novel.
Nto Nto
Eventhough the book is composed by four different unrelated stories, of a black evaegelist in Liberia, a black woman heading for a new life in California during the pilgrimage of the XIX century, the Captain of a slaves trading vessel, and a G.I in England during the II World War; for me there is a phrase that encompass most of the sadness and despair that goes with a life that other persons have damaged and limited due to the shade of your skin and not because of your actions and omissions.
"The young evangelist preached with all his might, but Marta could not find solace in religion, and was unable to sympathize with the sufferings of the sun of God when set against her own private misery".
showtime showtime
Caryl Phillips' Booker Prize shortlisted book CROSSING THE RIVER provides welcomed stories about a group of Americans whose stories have too long been untold or ignored. It deserves 5 stars. If you enjoyed reading CROSSING THE RIVER, I think you would like my novel THE MAN WITH THE SILVER TONGUE, which is also a tale about slavery and human dignity--another story that should have been told years ago. The Man With The Silver Tongue
Agagamand Agagamand
This book was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 1993, Britain's equivalent to the Pulitzer. Phillips was born in the West Indies but raised in England, and the book is a series of first person narratives and stories told from a variety of points of view: an African father who sells his children into slavery, a freed slave in the South, an African-American GI in World War II. It moves from 1830s to 1960s in a sweeping look at the African Diaspora caused by slavery.
Roru Roru
though it was my original impulse to do so, i felt bad giving this book 2 stars because i was able to read it pretty well all the way through, and i was kept somewhat interested in what was going to happen next, and i liked the overall idea of the book - to explore some of the less obvious aspects of the impact of slavery. however, when considering the 4 topics chosen for this book, there seems no obvious reason as to why they were chosen. they are not connected in any way other than they involve descendents of slaves, and they dont seem to be of any other objective importance. within that, there are some innovative storytelling techniques, such as the story of the ship being told through the daily log, but then there are the parts where the captain is writing love letters, which seems to have nothing to do with the story other than to show him as having two different aspects to his personality, and to explore the way in which the writer is able to emulate an 18th century writing style. however, there is nothing dramatically important about those letters. we dont get to know the captain in enough contexts in order to care much about his love life - especially one so mushy. similarly, there is no real reason that the former slave master visits liberia, and there are no real character traits explored. after reading the book, im left thinking: "liberia was interesting." "there were black pioneers?" "slave ships sucked." "it must have been hard to have an interracial relationship in the 40s." and not much else. not much else is given, other than a writing style that is true to the time periods it discusses.
I love Phillips' writing style in this historical fiction. I read it ten years ago, and it is still one of my favorites that I lend out to friends with positive response.