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eBook Almost History ePub

eBook Almost History ePub

by Christopher Bram

  • ISBN: 0854491937
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Christopher Bram
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Gardners Books (March 31, 1993)
  • Pages: 432
  • ePub book: 1782 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1512 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf lit azw
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 694

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Jim Goodall joins the foreign service during the 1950s and is sent to the Philippines, where he observes the .

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. s treacherous dealings with the Marcos regime.

Christopher Bram (born 1952) is an American author. Bram grew up in Virginia Beach, Virginia (outside Norfolk), where he was a paperboy and an Eagle Scout. He graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1974 (. He moved to New York City in 1978. His nine novels range in subject matter from gay life in the 1970s to the career of a Victorian musical clairvoyant to the frantic world of theater people in contemporary New York.

Among these were several by Christopher Bram

From the acclaimed author of Hold Tight and In Memory of Angel Clare. Among these were several by Christopher Bram. The term 'epic' is often overused, but with a personal perspective from the life of Foreign Service agent Jim Goodall, with chapter variations from the POV of his niece Meg, the entire arc of the Marcos regime in Manila, and parts of Vietnam, are seen through the perspective of an American whose idealism for democracy erodes.

Almost history : a novel. by. Bram, Christopher. urn:acs6:am:pdf:5dd-339862624c27 urn:acs6:am:epub:caa-0f6da9aadc70 urn:oclc:record:1024175140. Duke University Libraries.

Christopher Bram is among the most intelligent novelists working today, and this is his most ambitious attempt so far at taking the gay novel out beyond the ghetto.

Christopher Bram (Buffalo, 1952) é um escritor estadunidense. Premiado com Lambda Literary Award, Bill Whitehead Award e Randy Shilts Award, seu romance Father of Frankenstein foi adaptado no filme Gods and Monsters. Surprising Myself (1987)

Christopher Bram (Buffalo, 1952) é um escritor estadunidense. Surprising Myself (1987). In Memory of Angel Clare (1989). Almost History (1992). Father of Frankenstein (1995). The Notorious Dr. August: His Real Life and Crimes (2000). Lives of the Circus Animals (2003). Exiles in America (2006).

Christopher Bram tells the story of Augustus Fitzwillia. Christopher Bram tells the story of Augustus Fitzwilliam Boyd, alias Dr. August, a clairvoyant pianist who communes with ghosts, and who finds meaning in his life through a strange love triangle with a righteous ex-slave and nervous white governess. Spanning the years between the Civil War and the early 1920's, this riveting and ambitious historical novel displays the immense talents of a prodigious, highly esteemed author working at the height of his powers.

A group of worldly New Yorkers inherit a friend's last loverA year after the AIDS-related death of filmmaker Clarence Laird, known to friends as Angel Clare, his young boyfriend, Michael, is still in deep mourning. Clarence's older, sophisticated friends-male and female, gay and straight-find themselves the custodians of Michael, a callow kid they never liked much to begin with. A gripping thriller about contemporary gay politicsRalph Eckhart, an unassuming bookstore manager in the East Village, meets Bill O'Connor online and they agree to get together during Ralph's weekend visit to Washington, DC.

1992) A novel by Christopher Bram. s treacherous dealings with the Marcos regime, dealings that shake his belief in his government and himself. Genre: Literary Fiction. Used availability for Christopher Bram's Almost History. March 1993 : UK Paperback.

Author Christopher Bram would like to push the date back a couple decades, where he finds pioneers sitting in front of. .Much of the literary history Bram recounts takes place in New York City, where Bram – a native of the Norfolk, V. area- has lived since 1978.

Author Christopher Bram would like to push the date back a couple decades, where he finds pioneers sitting in front of typewriters rather than battling cops on the streets of Greenwich Village. Unsurprisingly, a large proportion of that history centers on Greenwich Village, where Bram has lived since the following year with his partner, filmmaker Draper Shreeve. "New York has always attracted people in the arts, and it's always attracted gays," he said. So inevitably, you get a lot of gay writers living here.

Jim Goodall joins the foreign service during the 1950s and is sent to the Philippines, where he observes the U.S.'s treacherous dealings with the Marcos regime, dealings that shake his belief in his government and himself.

Comments

Usishele Usishele
This story sounds so authentic, the hero, Jim, so flawed -- like Everyman -- that his journey grips you from the first page. Don't expect James Bond but instead you will get inside the head of a real Foreign Service officer, one who happens to be a gay closeted man in the era long before AIDS. Jim sometimes makes bad decisions and I cringed when he did. He ploughs on, grappling with the cards he's dealt and trying to serve his country yet keep his secret. Through every twist and turn I was enthralled...and watched Jim evolve, from his loving relationship with his niece, to his business and diplomatic dealings. The story goes from the USA to the Philippines to Viet Nam. Every character in the story is memorably drawn, so real that I believe they actually existed. I got my first copy from the public library and now own my copy to read again.
Buridora Buridora
Recently, I decided to reread some of the novels that have been on my bookshelves for decades. Among these were several by Christopher Bram.

The term 'epic' is often overused, but with a personal perspective from the life of Foreign Service agent Jim Goodall, with chapter variations from the POV of his niece Meg, the entire arc of the Marcos regime in Manila, and parts of Vietnam, are seen through the perspective of an American whose idealism for democracy erodes.

With numerous up-close encounters with the Manila dictator and his infamous wife Imelda, this story charts the shifting corruption of U.S. influence in southeast Asian politics from the 1950s to the early '80s.

Goodall's closeted life is gradually cracked open through a unique array of encounters and affairs, but love remains a foreign entity for him. His once earnest values are questioned, particularly through the eyes of his niece and Goodall's affair with her duplicitous boyfriend. The strange and secretive world of Washington D.C. politics and global events become uniquely personal and effecting.
Snowseeker Snowseeker
This book is among the finest from one of the most interesting writers currently struggling to break out the straightjacket (pun intended) of "gay fiction." Though its author and protagonist are gay men, and a late-in-life "coming out" is among the themes, this is first of all a political epic that anyone can enjoy, set in a recent past that most of us watched on television.
Straight friends -- even some who aren't used to gay people, and who would never read "gay fiction" -- have found this book compelling for its core story of a diplomat whose career (driven in part by a denied sexuality) propels him to the edge of great moments of history -- from the Vietnam war through the Philippine revolution -- but who never leaves his mark on history itself. A great read.
Agrainel Agrainel
There are so many good books about the Big History (always spelled with capitals) that some writers feel the need to look for almost history (with no capitals at all). Christopher Bram made an attempt to carve a sizeable novel out of a not-so-important (from the point of view of the US) historical event and a not-so-interesting character. The result, as one might quite easily guess, is not-so-good. One can quite easily see Bram's good intensions (a non-standard gay character, a non-standard point of view etc.) but don't we all know the real value of good intensions? I am no specialist on the Philippines but sticking to home turf does him much better. An Almost Good Read in effect.
Fenrikree Fenrikree
Christopher Bram is among the most intelligent novelists working today, and this is his most ambitious attempt so far at taking the gay novel out beyond the ghetto. It includes a clear-eyed indictment of American foreign policy, that addresses - and by inference links - the horrors of American militarism in Vietnam and the more insidious but no less vicious diplomatic support for the Marcos regime in the Phillipines.
The central figure, Jim Goodall, is a Washington career diplomat at once homosexual but only 'almost' gay. In the course of the novel he travels from detachment to muted acceptance of his sexuality, and from detatchment to confrontation with the war machine that employs him. Unlike the attractive gay heroes in some of Bram's novels - Hank, in 'Hold Tight', for example - Goodall is not particularly appealing. But unlike Bram's better-known bystander, the James Whale figure in his 'Father of Frankenstein', Goodall is living at points where history truly is happening, and there are no sidelines. His urgent question is whether gayness and diplomat status do keep him only 'almost' complicit with the gung-ho male-bonding military that he's actively on side with - and the answer is (almost) 'no'. So it's not a simple book with a positive-image hero, but something braver. Like a lot of great big bold novels - from 'Middlemarch' to 'Lolita' - it takes the risk of centring on a protagonist who is never fully likeable. There are parallels for this too in distinguished gay writing, and I found myself recalling Angus Wilson's wonderful 'As if By Magic', which also surveys the disasterousness of first-world intervention in third-world countries - and does so through the eyes of a man coming to terms with gay sexuality while bonded more with a girl from a younger generation of his own family than with any of the men who happen to share his bed.
Bram's fearlessness is especially apparent in several extraordinary scenes that feature Imelda Marcos as a high-camp Dickensian monster. These are black comedy encounters testing out how far camp excess is tolerable when crisis is extreme. It's in the end a novel about responsibility, asking what happens people who have been written out of history - as for so long gay people have been - once they find themselves assimilated through turning-point events. Resolution is only on the level of the personal and the intimate, and the ending makes plain the dissatisfactions which thereby persist. In short, it's a story of personal revolution achieved in lives that stay tied to a culture that blocks off change and betterment on any broader level.
Among the great pleasures of this novel are its unfaltering commitment to awareness, always evident in the quality of its writing, which is never less than fluently elegant, and which again and again manages moments of lucidity and illumination that reach out towards a better state than the characters can achieve. Hence for me its re-readabilty.
Waiso Waiso
From the pretentious title to the all intouchable american pseudo superman caracters that come to redeem the savages of some third wourld coutry, this romance is a sad case of hypocresy.Almost History