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eBook Mother Night ePub

eBook Mother Night ePub

by Kurt Vonnegut

  • ISBN: 0586036490
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Kurt Vonnegut
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Distribution Services; New edition edition (February 22, 1973)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1505 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1348 kb
  • Other: docx lit lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 212

Description

Home Kurt Vonnegut Mother Night "UNIQUE. one of the writers who map our landscapes for us, who give names to the places we know best.

Home Kurt Vonnegut Mother Night. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16. America's greatest satirist "UNIQUE. our finest black-humorist. We laugh in self-defense.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Vonnegut is George Orwell, Dr. Caligari and Flash Gordon compounded into one writer. a zany but moral mad scientist. Time Mother Night is a daring challenge to our moral sense. American Howard W. Campbell.

Mother Night is a novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut, first published in February 1962. The title of the book is taken from Goethe's Faust

Mother Night is a novel by American author Kurt Vonnegut, first published in February 1962. The title of the book is taken from Goethe's Faust. The novel takes the form of the fictional memoirs of Howard W. Campbell J. an American, who moved to Germany in 1923 at age 11, and later became a well-known playwright and Nazi propagandist.

Harshly dividing critics and readers alike, Kurt Vonnegut Jr. will nevertheless be. . will nevertheless be remembered as one of the most important and influential writers of the 20th century. With a body of work spanning over 50 years, Vonnegut’s distinctive style and voice, as well as the ambitious themes that he tried to tackle, have left a legacy that demands exploring. Another of Vonnegut’s superb works of satire, Mother Night is the tale of the reluctant American Nazi propagandist Howard W. Campbell Jr. With its moral message, that we are what we pretend to be, and so must be extremely careful about what this is, Mother Night is a cautionary tale excellently spun by its author.

191 quotes from Mother Night: ‘We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to b. It's good for you. ― Kurt Vonnegut, Mother Night. Mother Night Quotes Showing 1-30 of 191. We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be. tags: action, attitude, choice, imagination, inspiration, life, pretend.

The novel was something of a cult book during the Vietnam era for its antiwar sentiments.

The appeal of Kurt Vonnegut, especially to bright younger readers of the past few decades, may be attributed partly to the fact that he is one of the few writers who have successfully straddled the imaginary line between asy and "real literature. The novel was something of a cult book during the Vietnam era for its antiwar sentiments.

Mother Night is a daring challenge to our moral sense.

Author: Kurt Vonnegut. Mother Night is a daring challenge to our moral sense. But is he really guilty? In this brilliant book rife with true gallows humor, Vonnegut turns black and white into a chilling shade of gray with a verdict that will haunt us all.

Over the course of Kurt Vonnegut's career as a writer, he sat down many times with radio host and interviewer Walter James Miller to conduct in-depth discussions of his work and the world.

Be the light that helps others see; it is what gives life its deepest significance. Over the course of Kurt Vonnegut's career as a writer, he sat down many times with radio host and interviewer Walter James Miller to conduct in-depth discussions of his work and the world. Now Caedmon has collected the best of these interviews on CD for t. Like Shaking Hands with God: A Conversation About Writing.

1st Panther 1973 edition paperback vg condition In stock shipped from our UK warehouse

Comments

Anicasalar Anicasalar
When I mention my curiosity to read a specific author, my fellow readers always have that one book that they tell me I must read. When I first started to explore Vonnegut, many said "you gotta read Slaughterhouse Five". I read it, and while I appreciated the cleverness of the piece, I was astonished that an author whom went through some of these WW2 experiences in real life could so expertly skirt around his own heart while retelling them. I felt unsatisfied. Some other readers told me "you gotta read Cat's Cradle." I read it. The metaphors were interesting and the prose was impressive, but I still didn't love the story.

Finally, Mother Night is the one book that I am so glad I read by Vonnegut. It tells the after war story of a Nazi propaganda radio star who is going to trial in Israel for war crimes. Though a serious topic, I laughed many times at the many absurdly true observations about humanity. I was totally surprised by the plot twists that made this a very rich tale. It was the first time that I felt the author's heart in his book. It made me wonder if the ideas and feelings expressed by the characters in Mother Night were a glimpse into the real Kurt Vonnegut, much more so than Slaughterhous Five which was more factually biographical. Mother Night felt emotionally true. It gave a profound description of how people could commit atrocities and how others could survive them, all the while breathing life into fanatics, spies, lovers, and survivors. Brilliant.

If there was one book to read from Vonnegut, it's this one. It's also the only Vonnegut novel to date that I would likely read again. Feeling satisfied.
Bolv Bolv
I bought this with the goal of being entertained by another Vonnegut book, and walked away with so much more. This book is highly relevant today. I wish that this was required reading in college, especially with the widespread hate in our society, and the fact that large portions of our society are being demonized (a dangerous thing to do). I don't want to give it away, just read it! Here is a quote in it that highlights a major theme of it, "There are plenty of good reasons for fighting, but no good reason ever to hate without reservation, to imagine that God Almighty Himself hates with you, too. Where's evil? It's that large part of every man that wants to hate without limit, that wants to hate with God on its side. It's that part of every man that finds all kinds of ugliness so attractive."
santa santa
A haunting tale exposing the most fundamental and personal of human struggles - the battle for identity that is constantly fought between the self as understood by our inner minds, and the self as it is presented to and understood by the outside world. Vonnegut crafts an exquisite journey into the mind of a man who may be either a hero or a monster, and more than likely is a little of both. In doing so he exposes the juxtaposed extremes of our nature, and forces the question of who we are, really, and whose understanding of us is the true picture of who we are, if any at all? An uncomfortable question, perhaps, but Vonnegut's characteristic wit and ability to craft a compelling story triumphs here in creating an image of a man that plainly forces the reader to engage these questions of identity, but allows them to see the puzzle as another humorous absurdity inherent in this whole game of life we're all playing. Kurt, I hope that you are at peace wherever you are, because it is books such as these that allow a sense of peace to prevail when confronting these weighty subjects regarding our existence as overly-intelligence chimpanzees on a wildy active planet.
Daizil Daizil
Howard W. Campbell, Jr., an American who moved to Germany in 1923 at age 11, sits in his jail cell in Israel awaiting trial for war crimes during World War Two, writing his memoirs. Campbell was a well-known playwright and Nazi propagandist, recruited as a spy by an American agent shortly before WWII started.

The story follows Campbell and his rise through Goebbel’s Nazi propaganda organization, the war, and his eventual return to America. In New York City he is discovered by white supremacists, who consider him a hero. Not to give away much more of the story, I’ll leave off here.

The novel was fantastic. (Disclaimer: Kurt Vonnegut is a big favorite of mine, so…) There was also a jarring thought I had early into the reading: This was published in the early 1960’s, but actual, authentic, confirmed and dedicated Nazis are alive and well, going stronger than ever here in good old America. In 2017!! Everywhere. Not famous or obvious, just otherwise ordinary people. Nazis! Completely depressing and horrifying, and true.

And it’s Vonnegut, so of course I’m going to rave. Highly recommended.
Kerry Kerry
If you're a fan of the WWII/post-WWII backdrop, this story is especially amazing. I tend to think that era was about the most interesting aspect of American History and so, this is one of my favorite stories yet.

Oddly enough, it does serve to humanize a group of people who we're taught to instinctively consider as monsters, but it does so without absolving anyone of responsibility for their actions.
Cktiell Cktiell
This is not one of Vonnegut's most popular or well reviewed books. In his bibliography, it probably falls under the heading of "neglected."

I think I have read all of Vonnegut's novels, and most of them at least twice. But this one, despite its obscurity, hangs onto me the hardest. It's all about that grey line between doing the right thing for the wrong reasons, and doing the wrong thing for the right reasons, being a subject to everyone else's agenda, and how your own responsibility for your actions can become lost in the noise of everyone else's agenda and expectations.

And, in a more concrete sense, I find it impossible to think of the post WW-II hunting and trials of Nazi war criminals without thinking of this book.

This might not have the punch of Cat's Cradle, the strident anti-Warness of Slaughterhouse 5, or even the dark cynicism of his later works, but I still find it to be the most emotionally and intellectually compelling of his novels.