cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Don't Mr. Disraeli
eBook Don't Mr. Disraeli ePub

eBook Don't Mr. Disraeli ePub

by S.J. Simon,Caryl Brahms

  • ISBN: 0701207736
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: S.J. Simon,Caryl Brahms
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Hogarth Press Ltd (September 17, 1987)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1487 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1258 kb
  • Other: doc lit docx doc
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 790

Description

Don't, Mr. Disraeli! is a Victorian Romeo and Juliet story, with affairs of the feuding middle-class Clutterwick and Shuttleforth . There is plenty of fun in the lighthearted fantasy recently perpetrated by Caryl Brahms and S. J. Simon.

Don't, Mr. Disraeli! is a Victorian Romeo and Juliet story, with affairs of the feuding middle-class Clutterwick and Shuttleforth families interspersed with 19th-century vignettes (Gilbert and Sullivan at the Savage Club, for example) and anachronistic intruders from the 20th century, including Harpo Marx, John Gielgud and Albert Einstein. Their book is irresponsible, irreverent, impudent, anachronistic, undocumented. The authors warn all scholars that it is also "fundamentally unsound.

Don't Mr. Disraeli Paperback – September 17, 1987. You'd notice it's the second in a series of eleven novels by the writing team of Caryl Brahms and . Simon, respectively female and male, each of which appear, at the offing, to be historical fiction

Don't Mr. by. Caryl Brahms (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Simon, respectively female and male, each of which appear, at the offing, to be historical fiction.

Brahms and Simon made radio dramatisations of Don't, Mr. Disraeli! . Disraeli! (1943) and A Bullet in the Ballet (1945); Brahms later adapted Trottie True for radio (1955). Brahms and Simon co-wrote the screenplay for the 1948 film One Night With You, and Trottie True was adapted for the cinema in 1949. Simon left two bridge books in manuscript, which were posthumously published in 1949 and 1950 Publications.

Don't, Mr Disraeli! book. Caryl Brahms, born Doris Caroline Abrahams was an English critic, novelist, and journalist specialising in the theatre and ballet

Don't, Mr Disraeli! book. Caryl Brahms, born Doris Caroline Abrahams was an English critic, novelist, and journalist specialising in the theatre and ballet. She also wrote film, radio and television scripts. Books by Caryl Brahms. Mor. rivia About Don't, Mr Disraeli!

Don't, Mr. Disraeli! by . Simon and Caryl Brahms. Disraeli by . Condition: good, pages lightly tanned, slight lean - please refer to images and examine carefully.

What others are saying. FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Don't Mr. Disraeli: Caryl Brahms, .

Caryl Brahms was born into a Sephardic Jewish family in Croydon; S J Simon was born in Manchuria. Brahms did the ballet bits and Skid wrote the parts that involved detection. She trained as a musician and wrote ballet criticism; he was a genius bridge player, winning tournaments, writing books on card systems and becoming the bridge correspondent of The Observer, when there were such things. A dancer is shot in the head during a production of Petrouschka, and Detective Inspector Quill, "the Scotland Yard Adonis", is dispatched to uncover the killer, only to find that the corps de ballet is filled with vipers.

Caryl Brahms (1901-82) was a ballet correspondent for the Daily Telegraph, a colourful figure in. .

Caryl Brahms (1901-82) was a ballet correspondent for the Daily Telegraph, a colourful figure in London's theatrical world and became a forceful governor of the National Theatre. Simon (1904-48) was born in Manchuria, became one of Britain's most famous bridge players and was co-founder of the Acol System. Together they collaborated on many classic comic novels in the 30s and 40s including A Bullet in the Ballet, Don't, M. israeli! and No Bed for Bacon (1941)

Used availability for Caryl Brahms's Don't, Mr Disraeli.

Used availability for Caryl Brahms's Don't, Mr Disraeli. May 2011 : USA Hardback. October 2011 : USA Paperback.

Don't, Mr. Disraeli

Comments

Fog Fog
If one wonders why this review is for the 1987 reprint edition of a book published in 1940 (and which was reprinted in Penguin paperbacks in 1949, at a time when they were orange with a penguin but no cover art), it's simply because if you did want to get this book off Amazon, the 1987 edition can be had for a few bucks. Never mind that I found the Penguin edition in a used book store in the dollar bin; you may not have that kind of luck.

If you did, however, you'd have stumbled onto a treasure trove of forgotten literature from the 'forties, from a unique pre-TV time when books were king (and queen). You'd notice it's the second in a series of eleven novels by the writing team of Caryl Brahms and S.J. Simon, respectively female and male, each of which appear, at the offing, to be historical fiction. But the two are satirists, and hysterical fiction is more like it. The authors (and reviewers of the day) would probably call this light fiction, but the appeal is yet to litterateurs (well-read readers) and history buffs, since they alone will get the numerous historical and literary references and borrowings. It almost makes you glad you had a liberal arts education. Or, of course, took history online.

With eleven books, you can pick and choose which period you want to mingle in, in this case the Victorian era. But 'mingle' is the word, as the authors warn that "this is not a novel set in the Victorian age: it is a novel set in its literature". They call it a kaleidoscope, in which any event from 1800-1900 "may come into focus, bearing no relation to the date at which it occurred". A certain sort of reader will greatly enjoy this series, even with little knowledge of the actual history. I laughed my way, for instance, through Malcolm Muggeridge's The Thirties in Great Britain The Thirties, while having only the sketchiest knowledge of that history in the UK. Bits of the style are reminiscent of Chesterton and P.G. Wodehouse, to name two other light humorists, but I can't say whether Wodehouse was the influence, as he was on so many other authors, or the other way 'round. And that might be another audience for this series.
Levaq Levaq
A truly marvelous comic novel that is, as its preface notes, "not a novel set in the Victorian age: it is a novel set in its literature". Around a wisp of a plot about two feuding families and two star crossed lovers, the authors construct a panorama of the Victorian world as it was, as it was enshrined in its novels, and as it was remembered early in the 20th century. I liked this even more when I was young -- it is a young person's book, full of glitterings tours de force, names scattered about like spangles, and so on -- but still enjoyed it very much upon rereading.