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eBook Morning Watch ePub

eBook Morning Watch ePub

by James Agee

  • ISBN: 0892440228
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: James Agee
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Queens House (May 1, 1984)
  • ePub book: 1555 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1228 kb
  • Other: doc mbr rtf lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 209

Description

The Morning Watch, a slim novel, takes place six years later. For all those who thought that James Agee wrote only two real books, this one, "The Morning Watch," should come as a real treat.

The Morning Watch, a slim novel, takes place six years later. Many readers view it as a sequel to A Death in the Family. It is the story of a young man at an Episcopalian boarding school during a few hours on Good Friday, 1924. This book, based on Agee's time at the Episcopalian St. Andrews School in south-central Tennessee in the 1920s, is in a way a sort of sequel to Agee's classic "A Death in the Family," even though it was written in 1951, quite a few years before that.

The Morning Watch is a short autobiographical novel which author James Agee began writing in 1947

The Morning Watch is a short autobiographical novel which author James Agee began writing in 1947. Completing the text in 1950, Agee wrote to John Huston that the protagonist was a "12-year-old boy (roughly myself) at edge of puberty, peak of certain kinds of hypersensitive introversion, isolation, and a certain priggishness.

Books may show some evidence of cover damage or markings to the pages inside. As a rule, please see photos for information about the exact condition of each copy as I try to capture each book from all angles to give a good idea of its condition

Books may show some evidence of cover damage or markings to the pages inside. As a rule, please see photos for information about the exact condition of each copy as I try to capture each book from all angles to give a good idea of its condition. If there are specific defects that I believe go beyond wear and tear for a vintage book, if the copy is exceptionally clean, or for any other notable details, please also see the body of the description for documentation. Learn more about this item. Shipping & returns.

The Morning Watch: A Novel.

1951 The Morning Watch, Houghton Mifflin. James Agee, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, et. The Library of America, 159, with notes by Michael Sragow, 2005. James Agee at the Internet Book List. 1951 The African Queen, screenplay from C. S. Forester novel. 1952 Face to Face (The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky segment), screenplay from Stephen Crane story. Alma Neuman, Always Straight Ahead: A Memoir, Louisiana State University Press, 176 pages, 1993. A chronology of James Agee's life & work, Agee Films.

With these words James Agee acknowledged the restless journey his biography would encompass. Agee's renewed contact with his Southern roots led him to write THE MORNING WATCH and KNOXVILLE SUMMER 1915, both sensitive depiction of a Tennessee boyhood. Agee's restlessness intensified in the late 30s'. His last major assignment before he left FORTUNE on 1939 was a trip to Havana in 1937. By the early 40's his involvement with THE NEW MASSES and his leftist leanings made him uncomfortable with America's war involvement.

Published by Houghton Mifflin (1951).

by. Agee, James, 1909-1955. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Houghton Mifflin Company Trade Book Archival Collection. Boston Public Library.

A re-discovered masterpiece of reporting by a literary icon and a celebrated photographer. But fifty years after Agee’s death, a trove of his manuscripts turned out to include a typescript labeled Cotton Tenants. In 1941, James Agee and Walker Evans published Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, a 400-page prose symphony about three tenant farming families in Hale County, Alabama, at the height of the Great Depression. The book shattered journalistic and literary conventions. Once examined, the pages made it clear that Agee had in fact written a masterly, 30,000-word report for Fortune.

Comments

Yar Yar
In Agee's Pulitzer-prize-winning, autobiographical novel, A Death in the Family, he tells the devastating story of his father's death in an auto accident when Agee was a young boy. The Morning Watch, a slim novel, takes place six years later. Many readers view it as a sequel to A Death in the Family.

It is the story of a young man at an Episcopalian boarding school during a few hours on Good Friday, 1924. The boy and fellow students are awakened to sit vigil in chapel late at night. During this time, the boy wrestles with the concepts of his religious teachings, the meanings of the rituals and the depth of his faith. "But how can you say things when you only ought to mean them and don't really mean them at all?" Much of the book takes place in the narrator's mind as he struggles to maintain focus on his prayers and fights the distractions of the world around him and the wanderings of his mind. In the end, he experiences what is not quite an epiphany, but more of a deeper understanding by imagining the experience of Jesus in the last moments before his crucifixion.

The final part of the novel follows the boy and his schoolmates after the vigil as they sneak out and down to the river for a swim. There, they find and brutally kill a sunbathing snake. Although this is something that might fall into the realm of "normal" for young boys, and although the narrator does nothing to stop it, he is guilt-laden. Something has clearly changed inside him.

A Death In the Family is a very personal and important book for me, so when I read Daniel Woodrell's recommendation of The Morning Watch in the notes for Winter's Bone, I immediately ordered it. Even more so than A Death In The Family, this is an introspective book. On the surface, very little happens. But in the end, we realize that something substantial has happened during the inner wrestling. An awakening has taken place, and Agee masterfully reveals it with subtlety and grace. In the end, I felt a connection with the boy in this novel, and his experience felt very close to my Catholic high school retreats. I don't know that other readers will feel the same connection to either Agee novel, but both have struck a chord with me.
Gindian Gindian
It is interesting that this book may well have been influenced by Agee's early adolescence. He is quite insightful as to the deep desire to be spiritually fit while at the same time being influenced by the carnality of his peers. I suppose I could have done without the foul language of the one character, but all in all I was impressed. The book is short, a quick read.
Kupidon Kupidon
James Agee's short novel "The Morning Watch" shows how, by 1950, Agee had matured as a writer and thinker. For all of its stunning beauty and sensuous description, "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men" (1941) lacks the cohesiveness and careful planning that distinguish "The Morning Watch." The latter work shows Agee writing at the height of his powers and treating a story, set during Holy Week in an Episcopalian boarding school closely modeled on Agee's own St. Andrew's, that resonates with deep religious feeling and sharply observed memories. The first two sections of "The Morning Watch" show the strong influence on Agee of James Joyce's "Portrait of the Artist," but, if anything, Agee's depiction of a young boy's undergoing spiritual torment is more believable and more sharply written than Joyce's account. The third and final part of "The Morning Watch," set in the early morning hours of Good Friday, is a beautifully-conceived reworking of Christ's passion as experienced by three young boys who have played hooky from school and who learn their own capacity for blood lust and tolerance for violence. Agee's fondness for children and animals and his deep love of Scripture are vividly evoked in this last section.

"The Morning Watch" is short--under 125 pages--but it is an unforgettable introduction to Agee's magisterial novel "A Death in the Family" (published posthumously in 1957) and a gem of a novel in its own right. It is easy to see why Flannery O'Connor so enjoyed "The Morning Watch" when it was first published, for Agee's clear-eyed understanding of his characters' fascination with violence and their coming to terms with their own possibilities for greatness would motivate many of O'Connor's own characters.