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eBook Face In The Frost ePub

eBook Face In The Frost ePub

by John Bellairs

  • ISBN: 0441225314
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: John Bellairs
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ace (November 1, 1986)
  • ePub book: 1597 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1824 kb
  • Other: lrf azw mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 446

Description

Hailed by critics as an extraordinary work, combining the thrills of a horror novel with the inventiveness of fantasy, The Face in the Frost is the debut novel that launched John Bellairs' reputation as one of the most individual voices in young adult fiction. The Face in the Frost.

Hailed by critics as an extraordinary work, combining the thrills of a horror novel with the inventiveness of fantasy, The Face in the Frost is the debut novel that launched John Bellairs' reputation as one of the most individual voices in young adult fiction. Рrospero and Roger Bacon, the two main characters in a story that seems crammed with wizards, were wizards. They knew seven different runic alphabets, could sing the Dies Irae all the way through to the end, and knew what a Hand of Glory was.

Gary Gygax included The Face in the Frost on his now-famous list of books that influenced the first iteration of. .

Gary Gygax included The Face in the Frost on his now-famous list of books that influenced the first iteration of Dungeons & Dragons. I'd known about it myself for 30-plus years, but I'd never gotten around to reading it. On the upside, it's short compared to most novels these days. It's also lighthearted for a fantasy work: Bellairs doesn't take himself too seriously, and he's happy to throw in laughs now and again. On the downside, The Face in the Frost doesn't leave much of an impression.

John Bellairs has managed to capture perfectly the ominous disorientation that I sometimes Have you ever woken up from a deep sleep in the middle of the night and found that, for just a moment, your nightmares have bled into real life? For a fleeting moment, things are just not right. Maybe it's just a feeling, or maybe hues and colors seem just a bit off, or maybe the shadows seem to be a little livelier than usual. Have you ever felt that? I think that's the reason I love this book so much

The Face in the Frost. Publisher: Macmillan, London, 1969

The Face in the Frost. Author: John Bellairs. Publisher: Macmillan, London, 1969. The Face in the Frost is a fantasy classic, defying categorization with its richly imaginative story of two separate kingdoms of wizards, stymied by a power that is beyond their control. A tall, skinny misfit of a wizard named Prospero lives in the Southern Kingdom a patchwork of feuding duchies and small manors, all loosely loyal to one figurehead king.

John Bellairs Bellairs is best known for his children's books, with an added boost recently from The House With a Clock in Its Walls being released as .

Lin Carter called The Face in the Frost one of the best fantasy novels to appear since The Lord of the Rings. Absolutely first class. With a unique blend of humor and darkness, it remains one of the most beloved tales by the Edgar Award–nominated author also known for the long-running Lewis Barnavelt series. Bellairs is best known for his children's books, with an added boost recently from The House With a Clock in Its Walls being released as a movie. This isn't a kids' book. Not that it contains any. Absolutely first class

Lin Carter called The Face in the Frost one of the best fantasy novels to appear since The Lord of the Rings. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The Face in the Frost is the third book by John Bellairs. The short fantasy novel is his first and only book to center on wizards Prospero and Roger Bacon. The Face in the Frost was an attempt to write in the Tolkien manner. I was much taken by The Lord of the Rings and wanted to do a modest work on those lines.

He was beginning to feel that this was a pointless, hopeless journey. The situation, the problem that faced him, was getting clearer in his mind, and the clearer it got, the more hopeless he felt. The situation, the problem that faced him, was getting clearer in his mind, and the clearer it got, the more hopeless he felt thout Roger, he was lost. After half a day of walking, something happened that made him strangely hopeful. He found a sign, a fairly new sign, that said FIVE DIALS: THIRTY MILES. So there was a town with that name, after all. He walked the rest of the day, stopped to build a fire in a little circle of pines, and slept a full nine hours. The next morning, after coffee, bread, and.

Comments

SmEsH SmEsH
I picked up this book because it was listed in Gary Gygax's famous "Appendix N" (fantasy works that had inspired the creation of Dungeons & Dragons). The book concerns wizards living in a fantasy realm that is supposed to be closely linked to our world in a late medieval/early Renaissance setting (mention is made of England and other countries of our world, yet the action takes place around two fantasy realms, the Northern Kingdom and the Southern Kingdom). There is some really gorgeous prose, and wonderful conceptions of how wizardry works. I found the overall plot a little muddy, but that hardly seemed to matter - it was just fun to read!
Xarcondre Xarcondre
John Bellairs was fanciful, and imaginative, and he loved to play with words using incredible vocabulary.
His children's books reflect a love of classic horror, and of magic, but they were clearly for young adults. The Face in the Frost was the one journey he took in that direction which was intended for adults, and it is an incredible story, reflecting a knowledge of theology, of myth, of story, immensely deep vocabulary, and a depth of references to other works only surpassed in Silverlock. Cinderella, Lovecraft, Tolkien, Shakespeare, theological works, they are all here, inside a work of his own imagination which I'd whimsical, and dark and deeply scary in a way which reaches into the dark midnight shadows of our inner childhood and brings back the cold fear we all recall. If you delight in language, and imagination, and fantasy, and story telling, go no further. This book is for you. It's not a bloody tale of monsters, but a tale of colorful men facing a cold gray darkness which threatens everyone in a mysterious way. Bellairs never wrote another like it, which is a pity, but this one story is a gift.
Coiriel Coiriel
I read this as a kid and loved it. It looks like some of the eBook issues have been addressed--I'm not seeing the typos mentioned in the other reviews, for example. But this eBook has been formatted in a small and ugly sans-serif font that overrides your font preferences--so I still can't recommend it as an eBook. Can't fathom why publishers ever do this.
Dugor Dugor
Gary Gygax included *The Face in the Frost* on his now-famous list of books that influenced the first iteration of Dungeons & Dragons. I'd known about it myself for 30-plus years, but I'd never gotten around to reading it.

On the upside, it's short compared to most novels these days. It's also lighthearted for a fantasy work: Bellairs doesn't take himself too seriously, and he's happy to throw in laughs now and again.

On the downside, *The Face in the Frost* doesn't leave much of an impression. It's a fun read, and the two central characters are interesting, but it's not what I'd call a page-turner. If Bellairs weren't such a talented wordsmith, I'd have left it three stars, since the plot itself is fairly "meh".
Mananara Mananara
This has been one of my favorites since I found the first edition remaindered many years ago. I still have that edition, battered and torn.
I have never read any other fantasy novel quite like it: There are no gigantic wars, just 2 clever and charming(but somewhat silly) wizards trying to save the world. There is genuine horror, but not going into grossness ilke too much horror lit nowadays.

When I found it was available on Kindle, I jumped to get it. I was glad to see the original illustrations were included.
However the numerous and annoying formatting problems tempered my joy. There is a space missing after every italicized word so it runs into the next work likethis.
There are random commas inserted here and there without, any pattern, like, this!
There are 2 mangled sentences in the very first (and my favorite!) chapter:
"On the artichoke dome was a weather vane shaped like a dancing of the observatory was a weather vane shaped like a dancing hippopotamus..."

I hope these issues are addressed. I would like to be able to read this favorite without irritation.

Update 11/19/16: It seems like the issues I mentioned earlier have been fixed. However most of the illustrations are now missing! Very disappointing. The older version had typos but at least it had the wonderful pictures.
Maximilianishe Maximilianishe
Charming and spooky and completely fun. This is what you might call "light horror" something really, really creepy but with no gore or violence. The menaces are extremely creative and original, very much like something out of nightmares. There is no safe place for Prospero and Roger as they battle omens, specters, and more. The story grows bigger and the threat more widespread throughout the book. The tension is incredible and by the climax everything has truly reached a fever pitch. I can tell it'll be something I reread again over the years. As a child I loved Bellairs's children's books and never even realized that he did adult things. This seems to me to be something that all ages would enjoy. A great read for a stormy night!
Sadaron above the Gods Sadaron above the Gods
I discovered this book in 2014 and I love it so much that I bought four different copies--one for work, one for at home, two for friends. It is quite simply the most spell-binding fantasy novel I have ever read, pure wizardry! For dedicated lovers of magic, wizards, whimsy and stark terror, this novel has it all...and the illustrations by Marilyn Fitschen are absolutely delightful.
I also urge you to get a copy of MAGIC MIRRORS by John Bellairs, a compilation of several of his works including The Face In The Frost and a sadly never-finished manuscript for its sequel, The Dolphin Cross, plus other quirky and witty stories.
I want to read this book for about 30 years. Finally got around to it, and I am sort of glad that I waited. I don’t think I would’ve appreciated it as much when I was younger. It has some great and disturbing and horrific imagery. I wish JB had lived longer and written more adult fiction.