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eBook Tech Transfer: Science, Money, Love and the Ivory Tower ePub

eBook Tech Transfer: Science, Money, Love and the Ivory Tower ePub

by Daniel S. Greenberg

  • ISBN: 1450553680
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Daniel S. Greenberg
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (March 28, 2010)
  • Pages: 278
  • ePub book: 1778 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1378 kb
  • Other: txt mbr lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 613

Description

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Tech Transfer: Science, Money, Love and the Ivory Tower as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Throughout his science-writing career, Greenberg has been a prolific contributor to many popular and professional publications. From 1972 to 2003, he wrote a nationally syndicated op-ed column that appeared in the Washington Post and many other newspapers

His novel, "Tech Transfer: Science, Money, Love, and the Ivory Tower," published in 2010, was described by the New .

His novel, "Tech Transfer: Science, Money, Love, and the Ivory Tower," published in 2010, was described by the New York Times as "a hilarious" and "mordant satire about scientists and universities and how they do business.

While universities seek out corporate funding, news stories rarely note that those industry dollars are dwarfed by government support and other funds. Also, while many universities have set up technology transfer offices to pursue profits through patents, many of those offices have been financial busts

Though high in national ranking, Kershaw University is a dysfunctional institution. Its geriatric president is afflicted by dementia. The faculty is embroiled in bitter vendettas. The students, when not partying or sleeping late, are in rebellion

Though high in national ranking, Kershaw University is a dysfunctional institution. The students, when not partying or sleeping late, are in rebellion. And, under an Army contract in a secret lab on campus, Kershaw's star scientist is developing an anti-sleep drug to keep troops permanently awake.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Daniel S Greenberg books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 8 of 8 results. Most popular Price, low to high Price, high to low Publication date, old to new Publication date, new to old. Science, Money and Politics. The Politics of Pure Science.

This book is a great portrayal of life in the world of high stakes university science. As a novel it leaves a little to be desired. Library descriptions. No library descriptions found. LibraryThing members' description.

Daniel S. Greenberg is a science writer in Washington. Those bastards, we’ve got to cut them back. He is the author of Science, Money and Politics: Political Triumph and Ethical Erosion and a novel, Tech Transfer. The Republican War on Science by Chris Mooney Basic Books, 288 pp, £1. 9, October 2005, ISBN 0 465 04675 4. Little is required to ensure political quiet in the American scientific community.

Though high in national ranking, Kershaw University is a dysfunctional institution. Its geriatric president is afflicted by dementia. The faculty is embroiled in bitter vendettas. The students, when not partying or sleeping late, are in rebellion. And, under an Army contract in a secret lab on campus, Kershaw's star scientist is developing an anti-sleep drug to keep troops permanently awake. Hot on the trail, a dropout scientist working for an investment firm schemes to buy up the secret formula, with time out only for his hyper-busy love life.

Comments

Biaemi Biaemi
This book was recommended in the New York Times, and like a fool I bought it. On Amazon it was described by the publisher (i.e. the author himself) and several glowing reviews as a funny takedown of the academic science establishment.

To succeed as satire, you need to have some insight into your quarry's motivations and thinking. But from the very first sentence of Chapter 1, it became clear to me that this author knows little about science and scientists beyond some buzzwords and Three Letter Acronyms. His human characters are just interchangeable paper targets. His real villain is the University itself, whose sins are repeatedly rehashed throughout this book-length screed. Greenberg clearly has an axe to grind against academia, and he slowly grinds it and regrinds and regrinds it again for the entire length of the book. Yet that axe never falls, and without that chop there's no story.

Everyone at Kershaw University, we are told, is venal and corrupt; but no one gets a comeuppance here. The long and repetitious setup takes us up to the last few pages, where the cast members are each rewarded out of the blue with what they most want. By the same logic, I should end my overlong critique by suddenly awarding Greenberg the prestigious Writing Prize and a movie deal. The End.

(Kinda unsatisfying, isn't it?)
Kage Kage
I bought this book because Nicholas Wade of the NYT, another science journalist, wrote a very positive review. The book is so poorly written that I have to conclude that Wade and Greenberg, both science journalists whose careers overlap, are buddies. The portrait Greenberg paints is supposed to be satirical, but every character is simply annoying. All of them are unethical, or lazy, or greedy, or all of these things. It seems that Greenberg just dislikes everyone associated with universities, from the president and deans down to the faculty. And he's not clever about it - his treatment is very heavy-handed, completely obvious. I'm reminded of the bad guys in Ayn Rand's novels, all of them also one-dimensional - only Rand made up for it by being a heck of a good writer.

Greenberg should stick to science journalism. He can't write fiction.
Whitehammer Whitehammer
I bought this after hearing it reviewed on the New York Times Book Review podcast. It is a satirical novel about acadame particularly research funding. As a college board of trustee member I found some of the outrageous parts of the book too close for comfort. This will not win anyone's "book of the year" award but it is a fast, fun read for those who care about science or what happens in higher education.
Burisi Burisi
I gave up on this book about 1/4 of the way into it and should have done so sooner. It's an over the top attempt at parodying university administration and ties to industry. But the characters are cardboard and the humor falls flat. There are many better ways to spend your time than reading this book!
Pameala Pameala
I wish I had known before I purchased this book that it is a self published (or so the imprint suggests) foray into fiction by an otherwise well known and well respected nonfiction writer. This novel attempts to translate into fiction the world Greenberg describes in his nonfiction book "Science for Sale." I bought this book based on the review in the New York Times, and by the reviews here that were not of the Kindle edition (given that the book is self published, those folks who wondered whether the problems with the Kindle edition were the fault of the publisher might be right), but the book didn't live up to its billing.
I'm an academic who teaches literature, and an aficionado of the academic novel, so I was looking forward to a read and a skewering in the vein of David Lodge's "Changing Places," Jane Smiley's "Moo," or Richard Russo's "Straight Man." Greenberg can write, but I found this novel a disappointment both as a piece of fiction and as an academic novel. The book reads like a piece of nonfiction, with far too much narrative overview. I kept waiting for background information and overviews to give way to good storytelling--scenes, for example--but it never really happened. Yes, there is a premise and a plot, and characters and dialogue, but you never really care about any of the characters, and the dialogue seems crafted to fulfill the obligations of the form rather than to develop relationships and characters. The portrait of the academy often veers into caricature, and sometimes he just gets things wrong (for one example, presidential searches are simply not conducted in one meeting by search committees made up entirely of trustees).
I will say this: although I was disappointed by this book, I found myself wanting to read Greenberg's nonfiction on this subject.
Anayaron Anayaron
The book is nicely done. I actually bought the book after reading the New York Times review this week. Most of the one star reviews are for bad Kindle versions and don't speak to the book itself, which is worth reading. In many ways this book is remarkably similar to Jane Smiley's fine book, Moo. It's setting is moved to New York, and it topic matter is diverted a little, but many of the same character types are present. I enjoyed it, as it is ably presented. The author has a keen understanding of how funded research impacts academia these days and how it weaves in with campus politics. Some of the characters are well drawn; some are exaggerations. Most are funny. University types will likely enjoy it most. Those outside the university should too, but should realize that the broad brush of satire and hyperbole is in play throughout.
Zeus Wooden Zeus Wooden
Returned the download to Amazon (who promptly returned my money, thank you, Amazon). Upper case letters missing (proper nouns, start of sentences, et al.), run-together sentences, etc. So many, in fact, that reading was very difficult - and a powerful reminder of how our written language works - and why e.e. cummings is not that popular. Unless they have cleaned it up, don't bother.
This book masquerades as a novel, but it's really a great piece of reportage from the front. You can't make this stuff up. Every word of it is verbatim from somewhere. Somewhere I've been.