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eBook Color Purple ePub

eBook Color Purple ePub

by Alice Walker

  • ISBN: 0671668781
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Alice Walker
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pocket Books (January 1996)
  • Pages: 253
  • ePub book: 1788 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1391 kb
  • Other: txt lit doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 553

Description

To the Spirit: Without whose assistance. Nor I. Would have been

To the Spirit: Without whose assistance. Would have been. If it is true that it is what we run from that chases us, then The Color Purple (this color that is always a surprise but is everywhere in nature) is the book that ran me down while I sat with my back to it in a field. Without the Great Mystery's word coming from any Sunday sermon or through any human mouth, there I heard and saw it moving in beauty across the grassy hills.

ALICE WALKER is an internationally celebrated writer, poet, and activist whose books include seven novels, four collections of short stories, four children’s books, and volumes of essays and poetry. She won the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction in 1983 and the National Book Award.

The Color Purple is a 1982 epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker which won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction. It was later adapted into a film and musical of the same name

The Color Purple is a 1982 epistolary novel by American author Alice Walker which won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction. It was later adapted into a film and musical of the same name. Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of African-American women in the Southern United States in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture

The Color Purple, Alice Walker The Color Purple is a 1982 epistolary novel, by American author Alice Walker, which won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize, for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction.

The Color Purple, Alice Walker The Color Purple is a 1982 epistolary novel, by American author Alice Walker, which won the 1983 Pulitzer Prize, for Fiction and the National Book Award for Fiction. Taking place mostly in rural Georgia, the story focuses on the life of African-American women, in the Southern United States, in the 1930s, addressing numerous issues including their exceedingly low position in American social culture.

The Color Purple, by Alice Walker, is a very intense book to read. The Color Purple is not written in the style of most novels

The Color Purple, by Alice Walker, is a very intense book to read. By intense, it is a book touching very difficult and hard aspects of life of a poor, black. The Color Purple is not written in the style of most novels. The author does not tell us everything about the characters, the setting, and why the characters behave the way they do. The novel is written in a series of letters, not dated. There are large gaps between some letters, but this is not revealed by the author; we have to figure it out ourselves.

The Color Purple’s deeply inspirational narrative, coupled with Walker’s prodigious talent as a stylist and storyteller, have . To the Spirit: Without whose assistance Neither this book Nor I Would have been Written. Show me how to do like you Show me how to do it.

The Color Purple’s deeply inspirational narrative, coupled with Walker’s prodigious talent as a stylist and storyteller, have made the novel a contemporary classic of American letters. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Alice Walker including rare photos from the author’s personal collection. -STEVIE WONDER.

The Color Purple is no more graphic than what is implied by billboard ads on city streets or overtly depicted on. .Never did telling such an American story raise so consistent an ire as that of Alice Walker’s epistolary novel The Color Purple.

The Color Purple is no more graphic than what is implied by billboard ads on city streets or overtly depicted on television or in superhero comics (during the romantic scenes). The list of school board meetings and library debates conducted over the availability and consideration of this book, especially in relation to the youth across the country, is historical as well as contemporary. Put your finger randomly on a .

Alice Walker is an internationally celebrated writer, poet and activist, and . Have you heard? Alice Walker's THE COLOR PURPLE is on the PBS Great American Read Top 100 list! Download this.

Alice Walker is an internationally celebrated writer, poet and activist, and winner of th.Get Updates About Alice Walker.

Мультфильм Чудо-Юдо - Продолжительность: 1:11:40 Детский Клуб™ Recommended for you.

The Color Purple is Alice Walker’s stunning, Pulitzer Prize–winning novel of courage in the face of oppression. Celie grows up in rural Georgia, navigating a childhood of ceaseless abuse

The Color Purple is Alice Walker’s stunning, Pulitzer Prize–winning novel of courage in the face of oppression. Celie grows up in rural Georgia, navigating a childhood of ceaseless abuse. Not only is she poor and despised by the society around her, she’s badly treated by her family. Her letters span twenty years and record a journey of self-discovery and empowerment through the guiding light of a few strong women and her own implacable will to find harmony with herself and her home. In The Temple of My Familiar, Celie and Shug from The Color Purple follow the lives of a brilliant cast of characters, all dealing in some way with the legacy of the African experience in America.

Winner of the American Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, this unforgettable portrait of a young black girl, her friends, family, and lovers is rich with passion, pain, inspiration, and an indomitable love of life.

Comments

BroWelm BroWelm
The book discussion group met in March 2017 to enthusiastically discuss this. Wow, we loved this book. Most of us had seen the movie at some point in the past (and a few of us had seen the Oprah-produced Broadway musical), but it turns out this is a favorite book of a few members of the group and everybody liked it lot. We rarely get this kind of universal praise for a book, so you know that if you didn't read it for group, you should still definitely put it on your list of books to read.

Most of us agreed that the language is tough and off-putting for the first few letters, but you both get used to the odd spellings and grammar and also the writing gets better at Celie writes more. After eight or ten letters, it all seems pretty normal.

The violence and cruelty is also tough and off-putting in the first part of the book but again, it gets less violent and you get used to it (what a horrifying thought!) as the novel continues.

The words that readers used to describe the events and language in the novel are "epic," "biblical," "powerful," and finally "beautiful."

The story seems huge and the family tree is complicated with parents, step-parents, unacknowledged parents, forced marriages, lovers and mistresses, as well as two dead unnamed mothers. But the major characters are clearly defined and change during the novel and, unlike many novels, the changes are clearly explained and well motivated by events in the novel.

Celie is so desperate to be loved that she loves everyone else without thinking of herself. The men are largely evil (this is probably a valid criticism of the novel) who are forced to learn and change by the strong and far more admirable women who shape them.

We enjoyed discussing butch and femme women (as well as the stupidly masculine men as compared to the loving and generous men), the open lesbianism, and the alternate Christian theology presented largely by the openly sexual Shug.

I thought that the African letters from Nettie were a bit dry and anthropological compared to Celie's personal and emotive letters. And a few of the readers thought that the ending was perhaps too happy with everyone turning out to be a better, more evolved character.

But these are quibbles compared to the well-drawn characters, the wide scope, the emotional fulfillment, and the positive changes that most of the characters undergo.
*Nameless* *Nameless*
The novel, The Color Purple, is about the main character, Celie, and her sister Nettie. Some other characters are Celie and Nettie’s stepfather, Celie’s husband, and Celie’s lover, Shug. It uses detailed imagery to paint a picture of all of the characters, their physical and emotional attributes. The main theme throughout the novel is how people of certain races and genders are mistreated throughout the era of the 1940s. The main character, Celie, is abused by her stepfather, verbally and physically. It shows her struggle from being stuck in his clutches, to becoming her own person, and earning her independence. She discovers things about herself, and discovers things about other people, and what they mean to her in certain aspects of her life. My favorite character was Celie, this is because the reader can see the progress she makes over the course of the book, and I think the strength that she finds within herself is inspiring and encouraging. I relate to Celie, and all the other characters in the book that have been mistreated, or abused. This is because I empathize for them, and I have had friends that have been mistreated, and I understand how it affects a person's well being, and besides that, their self esteem. I loved the book, I loved the type of insight it gave into an aspect of life that no other author really covers. My favorite part of this book was the part where Celie begins to realize that she is worth more than what she is being given. Through the support of her lover, Shug, she gains self-confidence and realizes that she did not deserve the horrible treatment that she received throughout her entire life. She had to withstand being molested by her step-father, basically being held captive by him, and then in a sense, he “sold” her to the man he thought would need her housekeeping skills the most. She constantly had to go through only being thought of as a piece of meat, and property, almost the maid of every house she walked into. The only thing I would change about this book would be the beginning of the exchange of letters between Nettie and Celie, the first section where it is just about 20 pages of Nettie’s letters to Celie are a bit hard to grasp and get interested in enough to get through that section. Although I am happy I did, because past that, the book was amazing! I read about what was happening in the African village that nettie was in, but also got to see what was happening in Celie’s life. I would definitely recommend this book to any of my friends, it has a great insight on the lives of black women in the 1940s, and unique.