cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Budapest
eBook Budapest ePub

eBook Budapest ePub

by Alison Entrekin,Chico Buarque

  • ISBN: 0747573654
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Alison Entrekin,Chico Buarque
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (May 8, 2004)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1447 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1462 kb
  • Other: mbr txt lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 880

Description

Chico Buarque (Author), Alison Entrekin (Translator). This was our book club book last month, I chose it because I was raised in Budapest and was eager to read something that brought back good memories.

Chico Buarque (Author), Alison Entrekin (Translator). This selection didn't cut it by a long shot. While there was some Hungarian interspersed throughout, the fact that the author failed to once step foot in such a magical city really showed.

Chico Buarque’s Budapest engages the senses and immerses the reader in the protagonist ghost writer’s surreal .

Chico Buarque’s Budapest engages the senses and immerses the reader in the protagonist ghost writer’s surreal world. Buarque is perhaps better known as a composer and musician (in addition to being a playwright, poet and novelist). These talents are on full display here. Entrekin's translation flows nevertheless like the waters of the Danube and Guanabara Bay combined.

by Chico Buarque & translated by Alison Entrekin. Buarque has created a warm, engaging, memorable first-person voice in his credulous and well-meaning Costa, the whole translated here gorgeously and sinuously: sentences at random can be picked and savored for delicacy and rhythm. Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 2004.

Not just one of Brazil's most influential and beloved composers and musicians, Chico Buarque has won high praise .

Not just one of Brazil's most influential and beloved composers and musicians, Chico Buarque has won high praise as a poet, playwright, and novelist  .

ISBN 10: 0802117821 ISBN 13: 9780802117823. Publisher: Grove Press, 2004.

Alison Entrekin is an acclaimed translator of Portuguese. to the Wild Heart by Clarice Lispector, shortlisted for the PEN America Translation Prize; and Budapest by Chico Buarque, shortlisted for. Her work includes short fiction and poetry for anthologies and literary magazines, in addition to children’s fiction, biographies, and novels, including City of God by Paulo Lins; The Eternal Son by Cristovão Tezza, shortlisted for the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award; Near to the Wild Heart by Clarice Lispector, shortlisted for the PEN America Translation Prize; and Budapest by Chico Buarque, shortlisted for. the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. Books by Alison Entrekin. Series by Alison Entrekin.

Chico Buarque (author), Alison Entrekin (translator) has developed into an intriguing and inventive novelist. When Ciccio finds, among the many of his father's books that line the walls of their house, a troubling letter dated & 21, 1931. Berlin', his existential crisis only intensifies. It seems that his father once had a child with another woman - a German son whose fate remains unclear. has developed into an intriguing and inventive novelist.

His books include Spilt Milk and Budapest. Among her numerous translations are Clarice Lispector’s Near to the Wild Heart and Chico Buarque’s Budapest. Alison Entrekin is an Australian literary translator working from Portuguese.

Alison Entrekin Audio Books. Sort by. Alphabetical (A-Z) Alphabetical (Z-A) Author Name Recently Added Most Popular. 10 Titles 25 Titles 50 Titles All Titles. Audio CD. Audio Cassette.

Francisco "Chico" Buarque de Hollanda, popularly known simply as Chico Buarque (Brazilian Portuguese: ; born June 19, 1944) is a Brazilian singer-songwriter, guitarist, composer, playwright, writer and poet. The firstborn son of Sérgio Buarque de Hollanda, Buarque lived at several locations throughout his childhood, though mostly in Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Rome

Fascinated by the Hungarian language - he is after all a man who lives by language, ghost writing speeches, advertisements, books - he spends the night watching television, trying to pick out words in this tongue, 'the only one the devil respects'. In charting the life of a Brazilian ghost writer enamoured with the Magyar, Chico Buarque has created his most original fiction yet. The novel coils round the reader like a magical snake from "The Arabian Nights". It is a storytelling labyrinth in Borges or Calvino mode, as Costa's myth-making, love-making and essays into another culture become mired in the world where celebrities make reputations and fortunes from the writing of anonymous others, where the reader is not sure what language, what reality is being offered.

Comments

Fordredor Fordredor
This is a masterly-executed literary work with a well-constructed plot. There are no apparent flaws, the author apparently achieved everything he set to explore, except I could not stop thinking it should have a been a poem rather than a novel. Some reviewers criticize him for not giving enough Budapest-specific details but this is beside point as the novel is not about Budapest but about a particular human condition. It could as well have been set in an anonymous central European country.

The 40 year old individual telling us his story is not in a great shape - half hartedly engaged in his work of writing on others' behalf, less than half heartedly committed to his family, and just seemingly having a problem thinking straight and behaving coherently. He seeks a refuge from his troubles in embracing a foreign language and - surprize - a foreign woman. Now, for all the respect for the objective qualities of the work, it is difficult to enjoy it without experiencing some sympathy for the story teller, and it is my problem that I found pretty much none for this middle-aged trouble-seeker engaging into actions rather more typical for teenagers. It was all the way like been in a forced company of an inebriated and delusional person slowly letting the glimpse of the true events emerge from his stream of conciousness. It was an enervating and rather unpleasant read but I found that I had to finish it anyway, reaching the happy end (if there can be any happy end for a hero in his state of mental facilities). The author was certainly right in making it relatively short and may have missed an opportunity to create a masterpiece by writing it is a poem, which as a poet he probably could.

I wanted to mention that I started reading this book because it was one of the many praised by the late giant of modern literature Jose Saramago in his "Notebook". This one ultimately was worth knowing about, and I will continue exploring the others.
Doomredeemer Doomredeemer
After following his career in song, I looked forward to his fiction. I did not find the main character interesting.. He was suicidal and very nearly is successful at doing himself away. The positive point is that Buarque de Holanda has a way of painting a long dream, which seems to be what he put on paper.
Tejar Tejar
I gave this book to my wife because Chico is the best songwriter ever and I wanted her to read something from him. She did some research in her homeland websites and found a Russian reviewer saying this book was the best ever-written. I agree with him. But you gotta understand that this book like a song, few commas, sometimes detailed, sometimes not, and he just keeps going, no stop. At one setence he is thinking how awesome would be to go back to Budapest from Rio de Janeiro, in the other he is in the airport in Hungary. And that's what makes it great, Chico is a musician, he doesn't have to explain anything, but you get it.
Kajishakar Kajishakar
This was our book club book last month, I chose it because I was raised in Budapest and was eager to read something that brought back good memories. This selection didn't cut it by a long shot. While there was some Hungarian interspersed throughout, the fact that the author failed to once step foot in such a magical city really showed. Our book club rated this selection with 4 stars on a scale of 10 (10 being a best friend for life and 1 being a shameless waste of paper). Our readers found the book confusing, sliding from dreams to reality and interchanging characters in the process. The plot doesn't go anywhere and neither do the characters - a frustrating combination. The agony was cut short by the fact that it was a quick read. The artwork for the cover was well done, too bad the content between the two engaging covers didn't provide more structure and development. Reading this was like watching a fringe foreign film with subtitles that jumps from place to place, character to character without any rhyme or reason. When it ends you are left scratching your head wondering if you simply "missed something." In this case, you didn't.
Kakashkaliandiia Kakashkaliandiia
Women are the source of Jose Costa's inspiration, as he envelops himself in words, yet dreams of female comforts, enraptured by the sounds of language, even the brief snatches of Hungarian he has heard while on a stopover in Hungary. He writes about women, on women, inking their skin, arms, legs, torsos. One woman will only let him write backwards; she reads the words in the mirror, then washes them off so he can start over anew: "Recently written words, with the same speed with which they had been written, ceased to belong to me." A ghostwriter in his native Rio, Costas is fascinated with language rather than writers, attuned to the fluidity of language, listening to tapes of those for whom he writes; ingesting their spirit, he flawlessly interprets their lives, those who receive acclaim for what they have not written.

In a world where the famous masquerade as authors, their works are, in fact, created by men like Costas, bringing wealth and fame to the so-called authors. Costas takes inordinate pride in this ability, delighting in his private achievements, happy to perform this unique task. Life is fulfilling until he is confronted with the real meaning of such anonymity, his wife in awe of a book he has ghostwritten, but cannot claim. On impulse, he returns to Budapest, takes up with a language instructor, Kriska, who teaches him Hungarian, "the only tongue the devil respects." Once more, language defines him, becomes his obsession, Kriska the source of his knowledge, the muse that feeds his dreams. Back and forth, between two countries, Costas can find purchase in neither, familiarity altered by whichever tongue he speaks, images wrought by his women, Vanda in Rio, Kriska in Budapest.

Costas is conversant with loneliness, displacement and his own lack of identity, as though lost in a snow storm that obliterates all but the phrases that swirl through his brain. In a seamless narrative, Buarque transports his protagonist through two worlds, lost in a search for connection but isolated by his own proclivities. This is a shadow world, where talented men create for the inept, willing to market their words, caught up in the pure joy of writing. As each of his carefully constructed personas disintegrates, Costas must choose whether to hide among the clamoring voices of others, or to temporize and claim an opportunity for love. This man is sympathetic, brilliant, often sad, as he navigates the treacherous territory of self. Luan Gaines/ 2005.