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eBook Signposts in a Strange Land: Essays ePub

eBook Signposts in a Strange Land: Essays ePub

by Patrick Samway,Walker Percy

  • ISBN: 0312254199
  • Category: Essays and Correspondence
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Patrick Samway,Walker Percy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Picador; 1 edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 448
  • ePub book: 1828 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1584 kb
  • Other: txt lrf doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 451

Description

That fact alone makes it worth the purchase. Great introduction to a great American thinker.

Each essay is laced with wit and insight into the human condition. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

A captivating collection of writings on Southern life by one of the masters of American literaturePublished just after Walker Percy's death, Signposts in a Strange Land takes readers through the philosophical, religious, and literary ideas of one of the South's most profound and unique thinkers. Each essay is laced with wit and insight into the human condition. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Oil-Protein Diet Cookbook.

Walker Percy wrote several books, many of them bestsellers, and is considered one of the greatest American . If that appeals to you, you are a potential reader of SIGNPOSTS IN A STRANGE LAND. If it doesn't, maybe you should steer clear

Walker Percy wrote several books, many of them bestsellers, and is considered one of the greatest American writers of our time. If it doesn't, maybe you should steer clear. 22 people found this helpful.

Published just after Walker Percy’s death, Signposts in a Strange Land takes readers through the philosophical . Writings on the South, Catholicism, and more from the National Book Award winner: His nonfiction is always entertaining and enlightening (Library Journal).

Published just after Walker Percy’s death, Signposts in a Strange Land takes readers through the philosophical, religious, and literary ideas of one of the South’s most profound and unique thinkers. Published just after Walker Percy’s death, Signposts in a Strange Land takes readers through the philosophical, religious, and literary ideas of one of the South’s most profound and unique thinkers.

Signposts in a strange land. by. Percy, Walker, 1916-; Samway, Patrick H. Publication date. Percy, Walker, 1916-, Novelists, American, Fiction. New York : Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. New York: Farrar, Straus And Giroux, 1991. Front edges lightly foxed. A collection of non- fiction essays by Percy published posthumously. Includes three unpublished essays as well as two unpublished talks ISBN: 0374263914.

The result is a book which gives Percy newcomers a rich introduction to his life and thought, and aficionados a gift of several unpublished pieces, including a term paper Percy wrote in college on movie magazines.

Signposts in a Strange Land book. At his death in 1990, Walker Percy left a considerable. Signposts in a Strange Land: Essays.

Signposts in a Strange Land: Essays. Published just after Walker Percy’s death, Signposts in a Strange Land takes readers through the philosophical, religious, and literary ideas of one of the South’s most profound and unique thinkers

Signposts in a Strange Land: Essays. From race relations and the mysteries of existence, to Catholicism and the joys of drinking bourbon, this collection offers a window into the underpinnings of Percy’s celebrated novels and brings to light the stirring thoughts and voice of a giant of twentieth century literature. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Remarkably revealing.

Connect with the author. Remarkably revealing. Signposts shows Percy in all of his moral and intellectual grandeur.

At his death in 1990, Walker Percy left a considerable legacy of uncollected nonfiction. Assembled in Signposts in a Strange Land, these essays on language, literature, philosophy, religion, psychiatry, morality, and life and letters in the South display the imaginative versatility of an author considered by many to be one the greatest modern American writers.

Comments

Velellan Velellan
Walker Percy is an author who's books I collect. He has the wonderful ability to write quite serious stories that are hilariously funny at the same time. I think he is one of the South's finest authors.
avanger avanger
Essays about the South in 70's and 80's. Brilliantly observed as always from this award winning author
Sudert Sudert
Great insights and expansions of themes in Percy's novels. Fun to dive in to whatever topic strikes your fancy at the time, and work your way through casually (but thoughtfully).
I_LOVE_228 I_LOVE_228
Gift recipient loved it
Ziena Ziena
Good
Kagrel Kagrel
Good book. No problems.
Qus Qus
This book was issued in 1991, to collect under one cover some of the more important essays or pieces of non-fiction by Walker Percy, who had died in 1990. I happen to think that Percy is one of this country's more underappreciated novelists and men of letters. "The Moviegoer", in particular, is a classic of American literature from the second half of the 20th Century. But, as these essays demonstrate, Percy was not only a novelist, he was a relatively deep thinker, concerned with science versus art, religion and morality, language and semiotics, psychiatry, the South and "the New South", as well as literature.

The earliest essay in the book is from 1935, the latest from 1990. Most of the essays, and the best of the essays, are from 1968 through 1986. Not surprisingly, some of the essays are, in whole or in part, now rather dated. Percy's "essay voice" is relatively informal and easy to read, but he does not modulate it very much from piece to piece so that, when three or more pieces are read in succession, a measure of monotony creeps in.

Most of us, I suspect, believe we live in unusually unsettled and unsettling times. So it was with Percy too. He believed that "the modern world had ended" and that "society has been overtaken by a sense of malaise rather than exuberance, by fragmentation rather than wholeness." He further believed that the function of art was cognitive, and that the novelist's duty in these troubled times was to engage in a sort of diagnostic enterprise. That perspective informs the title of this collection of essays, which is further explicated in the following quote from Percy: "Instead of constructing a plot and creating a cast of characters from a world familiar to everybody, [the novelist] is more apt to set forth with a stranger in a strange land where the signposts are enigmatic but which he sets out to explore nevertheless."

Actually, from the retrospective vantage point of 2011, the terrain and many of the signposts encountered in this book are not so very strange. Still, it is a book worth reading, or at least dipping in and sampling. I was not converted by any of Percy's larger philosophical constructs, but many of his "smaller" and less abstract comments I found worth noting and marking in pencil (I always use pencil), including things he had to say about Charles Sanders Peirce, Soren Kierkegaard, William Faulkner, Herman Melville, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and his own novels (especially "The Moviegoer"). I also enjoyed a piece he wrote for "Esquire" on bourbon whiskey, which included the following paragraph:

"The pleasure of knocking back Bourbon lies in the plane of the aesthetic but at an opposite pole from connoisseurship. My preference for the former is or is not deplorable depending on one's value system--that is to say, how one balances out the Epicurean values of cultivating one's sensory end organs with the greatest discrimination and at least cost to one's health, against the virtue of evocation of time and memory and of the recovery of self and the past from the fogged-in disoriented Western world. In Kierkegaardian terms, the use of Bourbon to such an end is a kind of aestheticized religious mode of existence, whereas connoisseurship * * * is the aesthetic of damnation."

If that appeals to you, you are a potential reader of SIGNPOSTS IN A STRANGE LAND. If it doesn't, maybe you should steer clear. But I can vouch for Percy's recipe for mint juleps, which I tried out four days ago at a mini-family gathering after burying my aunt after her 96 years in this strange land.
This is not the place to start, if you haven't read Percy before. When read fresh, much of this collection of essays comes across as rambling, with the themes of "Southerner," "Catholic," "Author," "Southern Catholic Author," and "Fan o' Kierkegaard & Dostoevsky" running incessantly throughout the volume.
However, Percy's engaging wit keeps the essays entertaining, and it is interesting to watch his fixations and how they change (or don't change) over time.
Of particular value is the discourse on semiotics, which is a nice primer to the uninitiated, but doesn't help one make heads or tails of Umberto Eco.
Still, I would recommend reading Percy's fiction before tackling this collection.