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eBook Zombification: Stories from National Public Radio ePub

eBook Zombification: Stories from National Public Radio ePub

by Andrei Codrescu

  • ISBN: 031211107X
  • Category: Essays and Correspondence
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Andrei Codrescu
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: St Martins Pr; 1st edition (July 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 307
  • ePub book: 1470 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1357 kb
  • Other: rtf doc lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 643

Description

Andrei Codrescu writes essays for National Public Radio. He emigrated to the United States from Communist Romania. Andrei Codrescu's message is serious, but he discusses these issues in an entertaining manner.

Andrei Codrescu writes essays for National Public Radio. His appreciation of European and American culture is evident in his writings. Mr. Codrescu defines zombification as indifference to suffering caused by overexposure to the media. Examples of Mr. Codrescu's essays include 'Escape from Politics' ("the Republican National Convention. It's the kingdom of the Overambitious. ); 'Riots' (after witnessing the 1967 Detroit riots "Gangs have stepped into the vacuum left by suppression of radical politics.

Zombification : stories from NPR. by. Codrescu, Andrei, 1946-; National Public Radio (. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Andrei Codrescu, a Romanian immigrant and English professor, writes essays for National Public Radio. His essays demonstrate his appreciation of European and American culture. Codrescu defines zombification as indifference caused by overexposure to suffering. Our television sets are portals that harden our hearts and deaden our nerves to the plight of the poor, the persecuted, and the dying. We relate to other people as shadowy images rather than as real people.

ANDREI CODRESCU was born in SIbiu, Transylvania, Romania, and emigrated to the United States in 1966. He is the author of numerous books: poems, novels, and essays. He founded Exquisite Corpse: a Journal of Books and Ideas. He taught literature and poetry at Johns Hopkins University, the University of Baltimore, and Louisiana State University. With humor and grace, wisdom and tenderness, Codrescu transforms the commonplace into the miraculous. His work is cause for celebration.

The world is undergoing zombification  .

These large subjects—along with lively riffs on dozens of topics, both timely and timeless, both everyday and strange—are treated with Codrescu's inimitable wit, insight, and candor.

Zombification: Stories from National Public Radio.

Codrescu expertly weaves together two stories in this neo-gothic work: tha. Zombification: Stories from National Public Radio. by Andrei Codrescu · National Public Radio. The world is undergoing zombification. It was gradual for a while, a few zombies here and there, mostly in high office, where being a corpse in a suit was de rigueur.

He was the Mac Curdy Distinguished Professor of English at Louisiana State University from 1984 until his retirement in 2009. Born Andrei Perlmutter, he published his first poems in Romanian under the pen name Andrei Steiu.

Andrei Codrescu linch when Europe’s second biggest theatre festival sets off fireworks at midnight. I emigrated to Detroit in 1966 where a revolution was in progress. Tanks of the 82nd airborne and National Guard shot at me for sticking my head out the window after the 6pm curfew. To avoid gunfire and meet poets, I moved to New York City in 1966.

This work explores Codrescus writings and how they are a part of the surrealist tradition.

Witty, aphoristic, and never at a loss for a trenchant comment, NPR's much-loved commentator, Andrei Codrescu, has been keeping his American audience abreast of the absurdities of American culture for over ten years. He is known nationally for his regular appearances on "All Things Considered," and now for his recent debut as a film star in the movie version of his own book, Road Scholar. The Romanian-born Codrescu is fast on his way to becoming an American pop icon. In Zombification, Codrescu's NPR essays from 1989 to 1993 have been gathered together here in one volume, where they appear in print for the first time ever.Born in Transylvania, Romania, in 1946, Codrescu emigrated to the United States in 1966. He began then to cast a keen and watchful eye upon his adopted homeland. The essays collected here come directly off the NPR airwaves, and were broadcast during a period in our nation's history that witnessed the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe and the radical change in American foreign and domestic policy. All of these momentous consciousness shifts have been chronicled through the eyes of Codrescu, an incisive commentator who seems to miss nothing. Ranging from indignation at world indifference toward the new nations of Europe to compassion for the underprivileged of the United States, Codrescu takes the pulse of our time with the exasperated affection and barbed irony for which he is known.The area of Codrescu's concerns is wide, extending beyond world politics to include, for example, whales, dreams, Gypsies, and yes, that weathered institution, Congress. However, the unique voice who transmits these startling words could only be that of the Transylvanian-American who has given NPR listeners a sense of 1990s wonder.Zombification is a powerful book by one of America's finest writers.

Comments

Ferri - My name Ferri - My name
Andrei Codrescu has become a legend, a sacred institution and an imperative in our times. His NPR vignettes are like mini hand grenades thrown under our cultural bus reeling through the 21st Century: His is a "whip lash back to reality" disguised as an innocent tonic for our troubled times. But like a "hot buttered knife," he cuts to the chase, and through the fog of the lethal ignorance that our troubled cultural times represent.

Being a teacher of English and a Creative Writer, Codrescu's work is "high" rather than "low" art, and thus, he gains a kind of immunity to go about his job methodically, deftly, quickly, and so efficiently that he is long gone to the next devastating critique before we know what has really hit us: And when we finally realize the full import of his comments, our "oversized cultural head" has been completely severed from its "pygmy body." [There is a profound lesson in this for all potential critics of American culture.]

It reminds me of one of Richard Pryor's jokes: When the Judge metes out a harsh 40-year sentence to a repeat drug offender for again showing up "high" in his courtroom, the addict says as he is being dragged off to his cell, "Thank you, your honor!" As the cliché goes, when Cordrescu tells us to "go to hell," we actually pack a lunch and look forward to the trip. His artful witticisms are the "final reality check" on our collective insanity as our cultural bus reels around a curve that the reckless drivers of our maximally bifurcated political system will surely be unable to negotiate.

Thus the real art of Codrescu's witticisms and vignettes lie in the fact that he uncovers and exposes to us in the starkest of terms, all of the lethal ignorance that we accept as normal. And then lays it before us in such a way that we have no "comeback." Unlike normal polemics, where we can again cover up the criticisms in a blanket of "why he is wrong about us" -- by arguing the merits and demerits, fine points, subtleties and nuances, ad infinitum. With Codrescu's witticisms, once the trap door is released there are no comebacks: we are on our way down to the bottom of the shaft, period, no second chances; no if, ands or buts: case closed. Only after he has meted out the collective sentence for things that we consider normal, do we then realize that these are indeed things that "truly normal" people are hanged for. Ten stars
Groll Groll
Andrei Codrescu writes essays for National Public Radio. He emigrated to the United States from Communist Romania. His appreciation of European and American culture is evident in his writings.
Mr. Codrescu defines zombification as indifference to suffering caused by overexposure to the media. Our television sets are portals that harden our hearts and deaden our nerves to the plight of the poor, the persecuted, and the dying. We relate to other people as shadowy images rather than as real people. Andrei Codrescu's message is serious, but he discusses these issues in an entertaining manner.
Examples of Mr. Codrescu's essays include 'Escape from Politics' ("the Republican National Convention. It's the kingdom of the Overambitious."); 'Riots' (after witnessing the 1967 Detroit riots "Gangs have stepped into the vacuum left by suppression of radical politics."); 'Advice to the New Chief: Inauguration Day, 1993' ("Be sure to carry a tool kit with you at all times. In the next years everything is going to fall apart."); and 'Soviet Maps: Reality and Its Next of Kin' (Repressed people "have learned to navigate by their stomachs: that's one infallible compass.")
Andrei Codrescu's essays are well-crafted and entertaining. One rereads them for their societal insight. Mr. Codrescu observes much, says much, and leaves additional clues for the reader.