cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Shadow Isle
eBook Shadow Isle ePub

eBook Shadow Isle ePub

by Katharine Kerr

  • ISBN: 0007268939
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Katharine Kerr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (January 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 464
  • ePub book: 1746 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1735 kb
  • Other: mbr doc azw docx
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 324

Description

Katharine Kerr’s Novels of Deverry, The Silver Wyrm Cycle. Despite what you may have heard or read elsewhere, THE SHADOW ISLE is not the last book in the Deverry sequence.

Katharine Kerr’s Novels of Deverry, The Silver Wyrm Cycle. Forthcoming from DAW: The silver mage (.DAW Books Collectors No. 1439. It is, however, the beginning of the end, Part I of the last Deverry book, as it were. The true end will be published soon as THE SILVER MAGE, also from DAW Books.

Katharine Kerr (born 1944) is an American science fiction and fantasy novelist, best known for her series of Celtic-influenced high fantasy novels set in the fictional land of Deverry

Katharine Kerr (born 1944) is an American science fiction and fantasy novelist, best known for her series of Celtic-influenced high fantasy novels set in the fictional land of Deverry. Katharine Kerr was born in Cleveland, Ohio; her maiden name is Katharine Nancy Brahtin. She describes her family feeling more like "British-in-exile" than American.

Books by Kerr, Katharine: The Spirit Stone. 10. The Red Wyvern: book One of the Dragon Mage.

The Shadow Isle Katharine Kerr. The penultimate novel in Katharine Kerr’s highly acclaimed epic fantasy series, the interweaving tale of human and elvish history of several hundred years, and many reincarnated lives comes full circle. As the tale of Deverry and her people draws near to its close, questions will be answered and mysteries uncovere. he wild Northlands hold many secrets, among them the mysterious dweomer island. Only the magic of Dallandra and Valandario and the might of the powerful dragons, Arzosah and Rori, can reveal the secrets and save the Northlands from conquest. Book six of. The dragon mage.

THE SHADOW ISLE is very much a "transitional" book. Nothing begins or ends here, despite the idea of some readers that THE SHADOW ISLE would end the series. Rather, it's a bridge to the concluding book of the Deverry Saga, The Silver Mage. Although THE SHADOW ISLE isn't able to stand alone, the quality of Kerr's writing continues to reach the same high standards it has evolved toward over the twenty years it took her to write the series. One person found this helpful.

Deverry (Imaginary place) - Fiction, Dragons - Fiction, Magic - Fiction. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on May 13, 2014.

Download (epub, . 0 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Shadow Isle is the long-awaited conclusion to the phenomenal Deverry fantasy saga.

This interest soon led her into the field of fantasy writing, with her first Deverry novel, Daggerspell, appearing in 1986.

Book fourteen of the celebrated Deverry series, an epic fantasy rooted in Celtic mythology that intricately interweaves human and elven history over several hundred years. As the tale of Deverry and her people draws near to its close, questions will be answered and mysteries uncovered... The wild Northlands hold many secrets, among them the mysterious dweomer island of Haen Marn, the mountain settlements of Dwarvholt, and the fortified city of Cerr Cawnen, built long ago by escaping bondmen from Deverry itself. And just who or what are the mysterious Dwgi folk? Thanks to the Horsekin, who continue to push their religious crusade south toward the borders of the kingdom, the human beings of Deverry and their elven allies realize that the fate of the Northlands lies tangled with their own. Although the dwarven race holds strong, the island of Haen Marn has fled and Cerr Cawnen seems doomed. Only the magic of Dallandra and Valandario and the might of the powerful dragons, Arzosah and Rori, can reveal the secrets and save the Northlands from conquest.

Comments

Ungall Ungall
It's said that J.R.R. Tolkien invented an entirely new genre, "Sword and Sorcery," by creating The Lord of the Rings. Some readers will insist that Tolkien's work, and Katharine Kerr's, falls under the rubric of "High Fantasy," but the difference between the two genres seems, to this reviewer, to be equivalent to the difference between purple and violet.

More relevantly, fully 30% of all fiction books published today fall into the genre, whatever name we give it. In truth, Tolkien breathed life back into the old Northern European myths about Elves and Dwarves and Trolls. The good Professor, an Oxford Don whose specialty was Philology, would be proud of Ms. Kerr, who puts her own fascinating and lively spin on the old myths.

The prolific Katharine Kerr taps into the ancient Celtic traditions to create the world of Annwn (literally meaning "Nowhere" in Welsh), an incredibly detailed, incredibly graphic land of the imagination filled with lost mountains, far valleys, and towns and villages whose denizens, most unknowingly, exist in a world filled with "Dweomer."

"Dwimmer," meaning "magic" or "sorcery," is an ancient English word, probably derived from the original Brythonic language spoken by the Celtic Britons in pre-Roman times. Likewise, "cwm" or "coombe," meaning "valley," appears only on Great British maps, the first variant being Welsh and the other Old English. "Weird" is a modern English word which means "bizarre," but it derives from the earlier word "weirding," a term applied to occultists who were supposedly able to alter fate.

Kerr's representational humans are descendants of European Continental Celts (Gauls), an historic people made up of numerous tribes who were decimated and dominated by the Roman legions commanded by Julius Caesar, circa 50 B.C. According to Kerr's mythology, the tribe living in the invented Gaulish Kingdom Devetia Riga was magically transported to Annwn, where they established the Kingdom of Deverry.

In keeping with ancient Celtic beliefs, Kerr crafts her epic in the form of an Eternal Knot. Theoretically, every tale she tells is the beginning, the middle, and the ending of the story, so that beginning the series with The Bristling Wood, book number three, should bring you right up to THE SHADOW ISLE. However, given the numerous storylines and recurring characters in different incarnations that have developed over the course of fourteen novels so far, it's far easier to read the books in sequence (and you're advised to ignore the separate cycles, which do not really stand alone). THE SHADOW ISLE is the fourteenth book in Kerr's fifteen book Deverry series, and is book three of "The Silver Wyrm Cycle," the fourth and concluding cycle in the saga.

The Deverry books concern the life stories of Jill, the heroine of the saga. What Jill does not know is that her life is inextricably bound up with that of the Dweomermaster Nevyn. Long ago, Nevyn was once Galrion, a Prince of the Realm, but youthful impetuosity led to his exile, and more importantly, to the deaths of several innocent people including his royal fiancee, the Princess Brangwen, Jill's preincarnation.

Brangwen's tragic death caused Nevyn to take a rash vow---to live until he had undone all the wrong he'd caused. Kerr tells the long tale of Brangwen and Galrion in what amounts to a series of short novelettes-within-the-Deverry-novels. Along the way, Kerr fleshes out her colorful, lively universe, which is populated not only by the Deverrians, but by Elves and Dwarves, among many other beings.

THE SHADOW ISLE begins with an interesting turn. Haen Marn, the Shadow Isle of the title is a dweomer island, occupied by dwarves. It has, to this point, played a minor role in the saga, but in this eponymous book, Kerr gives it it's due.

Haen Marn vanished from Annwn when the Horsekin raids began some sixty years ago, rematerializing in the very earthly country of medieval Alba. For those of us who are not Celticists, Alba (or Alban) is the ancient Celtic name for Scotland. The Albans seem entirely nonplussed by the appearance of the dweomer island, assuming it came from Cymru (Wales) because of the language its odd inhabitants speak. For the denizens of Haen Marn, Alba seems Deverry-like, but they are bewildered by the cult of the sheep worshippers---at least that's their assumption about the Holy Lamb of God. Kerr, like all authors, can't resist the obligatory inside jokes that propel all storytelling. The hoped-for return of Haen Marn to Annwn may well be the first sign that peace is returning, in what has become essentially a world war.

The Elves, after a thousand year long nomadic existence, are beginning to settle in towns, and there is talk of returning to their ancient cities if only the Horsekin raids can be stopped.

In Deverry, things are taking dark turns. Although the Deverrians and their allies manage to defeat the invading Horsekin in set battles, their victories have not blunted the Horsekin appetite for raiding, pillaging, slaughter and slavetaking.

Neb and Branna continue to study dweomer, though Neb is fixated on his past life as Nevyn. Considering himself the world's greatest dweomermaster returned, he begins to condescend to his teachers, and in his attempt to recover all of Nevyn's vast knowledge, he takes steps that may or may not lead him away from the Light.

If you haven't read Katharine Kerr's "Deverry" books, you will find that very, very unlike Tolkien's Middle Earth, Annwn is rather tumbledown and casually violent. The stink of horse manure fills the air of the towns, roadside inns crawl with lice, ale, the universal drink, is dipped from open barrels (flies and all), drunken men with swords go to war over herds of pigs and cows or an inflated sense of ego disguised as honor, rape and robbery are commonplace, illegitimate children, though scorned, are ubiquitous, and the Deverrian tongue is replete with curses, most of which cannot be reprinted here. Kerr seems to delight in coming up with more and more outrageous expletive phraseology, my favorite of which is, "By the scaly underside of a dragon's ... !"

J.R.R. Tolkien wrote like the restrained University Don he was. Middle Earth has the vertical intellectual airiness of the dreaming spires of Oxford. Kerr writes like the Rust Belt native that she is. Working-class Deverry spills horizontally off the pages in an entertaining flood, which is why it took fifteen full novels to tell the tale.

The individual plotlines of the Deverry storylines are straightforward rather than rococo, with just a few curves here and there. There's not a lot of mystery here, not a lot of unanswered questions, and any resolution of suspense tends to be pretty much what you'd predict. In the end, the reader has to keep track of more than enough incarnations and karmic twists that the addition of diversionary plot elements within the stories themselves probably would have had the average reader screaming.

THE SHADOW ISLE is very much a "transitional" book. Nothing begins or ends here, despite the idea of some readers that THE SHADOW ISLE would end the series. Rather, it's a bridge to the concluding book of the Deverry Saga, The Silver Mage.

Although THE SHADOW ISLE isn't able to stand alone, the quality of Kerr's writing continues to reach the same high standards it has evolved toward over the twenty years it took her to write the series.
Cordanara Cordanara
I've read, re-read (and collected) every single book in this amazing series, and I shall read them again too. Not once does Katherine Kerr slip in her chosen style of writing; every turn of phrase, every nuance of the way her characters think and speak remain consistent. She weaves ancient history with fiction into an absolutely credible almost alternate world with characters who hold true through their many and varied incarnations and her research into the intricacies of belief in 'white' and 'dark' magic and reincarnation is very thorough and well explained.
Even when she needs to 'recap' something explained in a previous book for someone who's a new reader, it's never repetitive.
Now I have all the books and the author says that the Silver Mage will be the last in the series, I feel quite bereft ... oh, please, Katherine, write more!
Silver Globol Silver Globol
As a long time fan of the deverry series I may be a little bit biased... I love the way Katherine Kerr continues to explore the future of the characters I have come to love, as well as taking the story back to reveal the past. I have never read anything else like it... I'm just sorry that it is all coming to a close.
Terr Terr
This book has been a long time coming and is the finale in a long and totally riveting series, it weaves all the loose strands into one amazing and glorious ending, I have adored the whole series and this final book has been the icing on the cake, so well worth the wait for it... Excellent work by Katherine Kerr...
Dondallon Dondallon
Not as interesting as the other books in the series, and pace seemed much slower.
Windworker Windworker
Fantastic series!
Kelerana Kelerana
Awesome book!
Loved the whole series