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eBook My Life as Emperor ePub

eBook My Life as Emperor ePub

by Su Tong

  • ISBN: 0571220797
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Su Tong
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber (2006)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1802 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1998 kb
  • Other: doc txt lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 656

Description

MY LIFE AS EMPEROR, the third of Su Tong's works to be published in English . Written in 1992, MY LIFE AS EMPEROR offers an engrossing story line filled with memorable characters and fascinating insights into imperial life.

MY LIFE AS EMPEROR, the third of Su Tong's works to be published in English (after RAISE THE RED LANTERN and RICE), tells a brilliant and compelling tale of fate, decay and decadence, and palace intrigue fueled by the whims of a fourteen-year-old and his manipulating grandmother, a figure strongly reminiscent of China's famous Qing Dynasty dragon empress, Cixi. Yet within this bleak context of impending doom, the author gives us a phoenix tale, the story of an unlikely rebirth into a life of peace and contemplation.

Su Tong is one of the most celebrated Chinese writers today. The New York Times calls him "an imaginative and skillful storyteller. The publication of this book - his first in almost ten years - will be an international literary event

Su Tong is one of the most celebrated Chinese writers today. The publication of this book - his first in almost ten years - will be an international literary event. His innovative, deftly constructed novels remain at the forefront of a growing body of work by a coterie of writers who have exposed new facts about China's past and posed vital questions regarding the country's future.

Translated by Howard Goldblatt. My Life as Emperor could be considered a pleasure cruise through my inner world

Translated by Howard Goldblatt. My Life as Emperor could be considered a pleasure cruise through my inner world. It has long been my wish to penetrate the millennia of China’s history, to transform myself into an old customer at some teahouse on an ancient street in the midst of a kaleidoscopic world with its teeming masses, and soak up the passage of time with my eyes.

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by. Su, Tong, 1963-; Goldblatt, Howard, 1939-. Su, Tong, 1963-, Emperors. New York : Hyperion East. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Now, with My Life as Emperor, Su Tong takes the other perspective-rather than focus on a poor crook, his focus is now a young man named emperor of the fictional Xie Empire. It is a wise and splendid mix-Su Tong addresses the problems of the hierarchies of people while treating the people themselves with compassion and empathy

Authors : Tong, My Life as an Emperor S. Title : My Life as Emperor. Product Category : Books.

Authors : Tong, My Life as an Emperor Su. My Life as Emperor. List Price (MSRP) : . 9. Condition : New. Publication Date : 2006-02-02. Read full description.

Nevertheless, these studies reveal large differences in the circumstances of women in different countries and help to illuminate the several developments in the labor market, the family, and public policy which explain the extreme feminization of poverty in the United States.

Su Tong was born in Suzhou, China, in 1963 and graduated from Beijing Normal University with a degree in Chinese literature

Su Tong was born in Suzhou, China, in 1963 and graduated from Beijing Normal University with a degree in Chinese literature. He is the author of the novel Rice and the three-novella collection Raise the Red Lantern, the title story of which was made into an Oscar-nominated film by Zhang Yimou. Su Tong now lives in Nanjing, China. Howard Goldblatt, an award-winning translator of Chinese authors, including Mo Yan and Liu Heng, is a professor at the University of Notre Dame.

My Life as Emperor begins with a word to the reader. We must not, Su Tong tells us, take his epic story of the Xie dynasty in China too literally, or look for parallels in history. Su Tong describes, with great skill, the mistakes the teenage emperor makes in choosing his enemies. Duanbai is deposed as a young adult by one of them: a usurper, himself doomed to failure, waiting in the wings. uk - postage and packing are free in the UK. Independent culture newsletter. The best in film, music, TV & radio straight to your inbox.

Comments

Mr.mclav Mr.mclav
I have enjoyed all Su Tong's books so far and this one is no exception.
Nice insider view of power in the imperial realm in China, but also there is much more to be gleaned from Su Tong's story.
The emperor may not be especially wise or intelligent, but he does manage to remain alive and although a monk a tightrope walker as well!!
Gholbimand Gholbimand
...I don't get anything at all. It's a pleasant story to the extent that death and destruction are pleasant. Its tales of intrigue at the palace are the usual ones.
So, it's an okay read. I really would not recommend it to anyone looking to take something away from their reading.
Ffleg Ffleg
This is only a so so book. If you have nothing to read, then read it. It is not exactly well written.
Lanionge Lanionge
Interesting and frustrating to read. The emperor is not a likeable character and that's ok but after awhile it just gets tedious.
Dondallon Dondallon
Along with Mo Yan and Gao Xingjian, Su Tong is widely regarded as one of mainland China's premier novelists, and with good reason. MY LIFE AS EMPEROR, the third of Su Tong's works to be published in English (after RAISE THE RED LANTERN and RICE), tells a brilliant and compelling tale of fate, decay and decadence, and palace intrigue fueled by the whims of a fourteen-year-old and his manipulating grandmother, a figure strongly reminiscent of China's famous Qing Dynasty dragon empress, Cixi. Yet within this bleak context of impending doom, the author gives us a phoenix tale, the story of an unlikely rebirth into a life of peace and contemplation.

MY LIFE AS EMPEROR is set in an unknown place at an indistinct time, although the author closes by locating the renamed imperial capitol as Changzhou in Jiangsu Province, not far from his own Suzhou birthplace. At the death of his Emperor father, fourteen-year-old Duanbai - the fifth of his father's sons - is unexpectedly called by his grandmother, Madame Huangfu, to assume the throne of the Xie Empire. Sun Xin, an alchemist and his deceased father's attendant - now reduced to madness - proclaims that calamity will soon befall the Empire. And it indeed does as Duanbai's ascendancy sets off a chain of palace intrigues among his half brothers.

Duanbai himself is feckless and capricious, immature and utterly unprepared for his responsibilities. Duanbai's sleep is filled with night demons, and he is given to acts of pettiness and stunning viciousness alternating with acts of deep sympathy and love. The only person he can trust, his mentor Juekong, is banished from the capitol to live out his life as a monk on Bitter Bamboo Mountain. He befriends a palace eunuch named Swallow and falls deeply in love with a concubine, Lady Hui, but his empire is beset by enemies from within and without. He ultimately loses his throne to his oldest brother, Duanwen, and is banished from the capitol to live life as a commoner as his punishment. The balance of the novel tells the story of Duanbai's life after his fall from power.

Written in 1992, MY LIFE AS EMPEROR offers an engrossing story line filled with memorable characters and fascinating insights into imperial life. As in his other works, Su Tong can be brutally cruel and explicit, but wondrously lyrical and richly symbolic. As he suggests in his Preface, this story is a dream from within the dream world in which he lives and writes. It is a dream filled most notably with birds and bird images: the foreboding white herons on the book's opening page, his eunuch Swallow, Lady Hui's Singing Oriole Pavilion, the birdlike feeling of tightrope walking, and the Double Eagle crest of the invading Peng Empire among others.

From young Emperor Duanbai's favorite cricket cages to his escapades with tightroping walking, MY LIFE AS EMPEROR is a tragic story of unasked for imprisonment and deeply sought freedom. In the end, stark military power prevails in the public sphere, but the wisdom of Confucius' ANALECTS provides the one true way to peace. Sadly, the path to Bitter Bamboo Mountain is littered with mistakes, needless suffering, and tragedy. Life is bitter, indeed.
Bearus Bearus
Su Tong made a quick name for himself when his novella _Raise the Red Lantern_ was made into a great film. One might think that such success could spoil an author to continue to write what has already been successful, but his next book, _Rice_, offered its own challenges when Su Tong took on a deeply disturbed and violent man as his protagonist. _Rice_ was a great book, because even through horrific events, Tong looked for the rationale of every character and allowed them to present themselves in honest ways. Now, with _My Life as Emperor_, Su Tong takes the other perspective--rather than focus on a poor crook, his focus is now a young man named emperor of the fictional Xie Empire.

Su Tong has fully confirmed his masterful ability to mix the harsh and cruel realities of social commentary with genuine pathos for the characters within those commentaries. It is a wise and splendid mix--Su Tong addresses the problems of the hierarchies of people while treating the people themselves with compassion and empathy. Duanbai, who ascends to the throne of the Xie Empire at the age of 14 even though he was not the first-born to the dead emperor, is a troublesome narrator, for he is spoiled and gets drunk on his own power quite easily, but still he is someone to sympathize for, for even with the power to have a person's tongue removed at his whim, he is still under the thumb of his grandmother, who will gladly strike out with her longevity cane. The implications of Duanbai's rash ruling are not as clear as they could be to convey the misery the new emperor is inciting in his own empire, but the growth of Duanbai in his friendship with a eunuch named Swallow and of course the problems people find with his claim on the throne, makes this a wise and wonderful book. Even if you find the book a little shallow at first, I would stay stay with it, for the ending is masterful.

Su Tong adds another successful work to his canon, possibly because he works on a very simple yet effective paradigm--even in the most awful situations, people will create their own happiness or misery.