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eBook Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay: Neapolitan Novels, Book Three ePub

eBook Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay: Neapolitan Novels, Book Three ePub

by Ann Goldstein,Elena Ferrante

  • ISBN: 160945233X
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Ann Goldstein,Elena Ferrante
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Europa Editions; First Edition edition (September 2, 2014)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1265 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1807 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf docx txt
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 136

Description

Jennifer Gilmore, The Los Angeles Times Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay surpasses the rapturous storytelling of the previous titles in the Neapolitan Novels. She is the Italian Alice Munro.

Jennifer Gilmore, The Los Angeles Times Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay surpasses the rapturous storytelling of the previous titles in the Neapolitan Novels. Mona Simpson, author of Casebook and Anywhere But Here Elena Ferrante will blow you away. Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones The Days of Abandonment is a powerful, heartrending novel. Jhumpa Lahiri, Pulitzer-prize winning author of The Lowland The Neapolitan novel cycle is an unconditional masterpiece.

They include the following novels: My Brilliant Friend (2012), The Story of a New Name (2013), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2014), and The Story of the Lost Child (2015). The series has been characterized as a bildungsroman, or coming-of-age story.

Now that I have read the first three books, I would compare this series to a tree.

Jul 25, 2015 Diane rated it it was amazing. Now that I have read the first three books, I would compare this series to a tree. In Book One, Ferrante had to plant the seeds of the story - those seeds were the stories and events that Elena and Lila faced as children, and each one has long-lasting consequences. In Books Two and Three, the stories are much deeper and more powerful, because the tree has taken root and is stronger. For example, who would have thought that when Lila designed a men's shoe in book one, that it would still be talked about in book three?

Место встречи изменить нельзя (1979) - Продолжительность: 5:57:21 СМОТРИМ.

In the third book in the Neapolitan quartet, Elena and Lila, the two girls whom readers first met in My Brilliant .

In the third book in the Neapolitan quartet, Elena and Lila, the two girls whom readers first met in My Brilliant Friend, have become women. Lila married at sixteen and has a young son; she has left her husband and the comforts her marriage brought and now works as a common laborer. Elena Ferrante is the author of The Days of Abandonment (Europa, 2005), Troubling Love (Europa, 2006), The Lost Daughter (Europa, 2008) and the Neapolitan Quartet (Europa 2012-2015). She is also the author of a children’s picture book illustrated by Mara Cerri, The Beach at Night.

The third book, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, just published in Ann Goldstein’s admirable English translation, begins not with a doll falling, but a woman fallen

The third book, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, just published in Ann Goldstein’s admirable English translation, begins not with a doll falling, but a woman fallen. Elena and Lila’s childhood friend, the formerly beautiful Gigliola, is lying dead in a church flower bed, exposing her enormous ankles, the hole in the stockings on her unshod foot and her red hair, so thin it reveals whitish patches of skull. Gigliola is the castoff wife of a local despot, and her ruined body is a reminder that women here are in continual danger of condemnation - by friends, family and society.

Those who leave and those who stay. Translated from the Italian. Index of characters and notes on the events. Of the earlier volumes. The Cerullo family (the shoemaker’s family): Fernando Cerullo, shoemaker, Lila’s father. He wouldn’t send his daughter beyond elementary school. Nunzia Cerullo, Lila’s mother.

In a rare interview, Elena Ferrante reveals the personal origins of her Neapolitan novels

In a rare interview, Elena Ferrante reveals the personal origins of her Neapolitan novels. Relationships between women don’t have solid rules like those between men, says the Italian author Elena Ferrante. Out this month, the hugely anticipated third novel in the series, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (Europa), seamlessly translated by Ann Goldstein, is set in the late sixties and seventies; the two girls are now young women, and the Red Brigades and feminism are shaking up the old ways.

In the third book in the Neapolitan quartet, Elena and Lila, the two girls whom readers first met in My Brilliant Friend . Ferrante is one of the world’s great storytellers. With the Neapolitan quartet she has given her readers an abundant, generous, and masterfully plotted page-turner that is also a stylish work of literary fiction destined to delight readers for many generations to come. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Since the publication of the acclaimed My Brilliant Friend and The Story of A New Name, Elena Ferrante's reputation has grown enormously. Her novels about the friendship between Lila and Elena, about the mysteries of human relationships, are utterly compelling. In Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, the two protagonists are now in their thirties. Lila, married at sixteen, has left her husband and the comforts of her marriage, and has now joined the workforce. Elena has left the neighbourhood in Naples, been to university, and published a successful novel, all of which has.

Now an HBO series, book three in the New York Times bestselling Neapolitan quartet about two friends in post-war Italy is a rich, intense, and generous-hearted epic by one of today's most beloved and acclaimed writers, Elena Ferrante, “one of the great novelists of our time.” (Roxana Robinson, The New York Times)In the third book in the Neapolitan quartet, Elena and Lila, the two girls whom readers first met in My Brilliant Friend, have become women. Lila married at sixteen and has a young son; she has left her husband and the comforts her marriage brought and now works as a common laborer. Elena has left the neighborhood, earned her college degree, and published a successful novel, all of which has opened the doors to a world of learned interlocutors and richly furnished salons. Both women are pushing against the walls of a prison that would have seen them living a life of misery, ignorance and submission. They are afloat on the great sea of opportunities that opened up during the nineteen-seventies. Yet they are still very much bound to each other by a strong, unbreakable bond.Ferrante is one of the world’s great storytellers. With the Neapolitan quartet she has given her readers an abundant, generous, and masterfully plotted page-turner that is also a stylish work of literary fiction destined to delight readers for many generations to come.

Comments

Love Me Love Me
I loved the first book of the trilogy and recommended it to pretty much everyone I know who reads serious literature and a fair number of people who might not. It is also the case that I was once a huge student of Italiant culture and lived in the house of some prominant leftist newspaper people as an exchange student in high-school. So, the events of this book speak to a deep (if somewhat cooled) passion of mine that other readers might or might not share. However, all the same, I found the second and third books altogether more difficult to read. While the writing is phenomenal in its minute psychological detail and insights into class and gender and how ideology gets used as a currency in social games, it is difficult and not always pleasant reading -- a slog at times-- as the inner-conflicts of the narrative become more intense and her personality less pleasant. I was never going to give up, but I didn't always find joy in this book. In short: read it, but save it for that moment in your life when you have the patience to deal with a literary friend who is difficult, conflicted, and at times even unlikeable.
Mitynarit Mitynarit
This is the third of the four books in Ferrante"s (whoever she is) Neapolitan series. It is a dark and totally engrossing examination of a friendship, a culture, a period of time, the role of women in society and marriage. And gorgeously written. I could't bear to put it down when I finished it and so went right to the fourth book. But only a few pages into it I realized I needed a break.

While to me this is the best of the series, I don't think one can appreciate it without having read the first two--which is not a hardship. Fortunately each book provides an annotated cast of characters, including (thank God!) nicknames, family relationships, and--if you've read the preceding books--brief reminders of what has gone on before, reminders that will only be cryptic to those who haven't immersed themselves in what came before. After I finish book four I will probably go back and read the first one, "My Brilliant Friend," again, to give me the benefit of both hindsight and foresight.
Arar Arar
This is a wonderful, beautiful book but the edition I received is paginated incorrectly! It is so depressing that it was issued like this. The volume goes from pg 384 to 353 and repeats section 99 to 110. I can only hope the printer didn't leave out a section. I will never know because I am not about to order another copy. It was printed in Italy, so maybe whoever did the quality control didn't count to see the page goes from 384 to 353 and also didn't read it to notice the same sections are repeated.
Such a shame as her books are absolutely riveting, compelling, and deeply honest.
Sharpbinder Sharpbinder
This is volume three of the author's tetralogy "The Neapolitan Tales," which is, in my opinion, a great literary work. From a storytelling point of view, the pace gets faster and faster from one book to the next, until I was totally engaged and on the edge of my seat, sometimes gasping at the turn that events had taken. The characters, who are children in volume one, were at first difficult for me to distinguish among, but become increasingly singular as the successive volumes follow their development into adulthood and delve deeper and deeper into their lives. Most compelling for me were the narrator's reflections on her own thoughts and feelings and those of the other characters. For example, at one point she says that she realizes that she could be both happy and sad at the same time. I stopped dead in my tracks and thought about that, and yes, I realized that I, too, have that capacity. In other words, she has the ability to take particular details of feeling, translate them into psychological concepts, and universalize them. I'm totally hooked.
Eigeni Eigeni
I thoroughly enjoyed the Neapolitan quartet. Elena Ferrante's narrative drive kept the story moving through all four books. The evolving story was captivating; the desire to see where it would end was more involving than any series of this length I have read. Actually, I'm not sure I have ever read a series of this length, another testament to the power of the story. The writing, while not elegant, was never less than capable, and the translation seemed to be excellent. I did at times become frustrated by Lena's continual obsession with comparing herself to Lila. That she was never satisfied to accept herself as she was without agonizing over whether she was better or worse than her friend seemed a way to waste her life in torment. I'm sure many readers associate the series with women's books, but, to me, it just a very good story by a woman that happens to illuminate some very unsavory and inadequate men.
Mayno Mayno
The four-volume series is an overwhelming experience.

You are drawn into an entire world with an enormous cast of characters surrounding the two primary women. The lives of the women are depicted with such honesty and vividness that it exhausting to experience and impossible to stop reading.

The story itself doesn't have an easy classification. The relations between the two women are so complex, that they can't be summarized even as friendship. The overall flow, which unites the story of the women with the story of Naples, has a kind of biblical power.
Andromajurus Andromajurus
This is the third volume in the series that began with My Brilliant Friend. The central characters, two women who were childhood friends, now have very different lives. The story grows from their poor youth in Naples to a broader exploration of post-war Italy. The author sets the personal against the political as she examines a world of shifting values. The three novels she has written so far give her room to detail the economic and sexual upheavals of the period. If you like Italian Neorealist films you will love these novels. I think there is more complexity in this volume because the characters are older and have to deal with both past and present.