cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel
eBook The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel ePub

eBook The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel ePub

by Brady Udall

  • ISBN: 039334164X
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Brady Udall
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (July 9, 2012)
  • Pages: 432
  • ePub book: 1411 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1114 kb
  • Other: lrf txt mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 656

Description

Brady Udall is the author of New York Times bestseller The Lonely Polygamist, The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint, and Letting Loose the Hounds.

Brady Udall is the author of New York Times bestseller The Lonely Polygamist, The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint, and Letting Loose the Hounds. He teaches at Boise State University and lives in Boise, Idaho, with his wife and children. Библиографические данные. The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel.

Head, Foster home care, Apache Indians, Orphans, Boys. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AliciaDA on January 5, 2010.

Whatever the word, Brady Udall finds it, and keeps it, in The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint, perhaps the best debut novel .

Whatever the word, Brady Udall finds it, and keeps it, in The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint, perhaps the best debut novel I’ve read. Many have compared Udall to John Irving, another writer whose work I cherish, but Udall, I think, is the better of the two, at least on this outing. It drags a bit too much in the middle, which is why I'm knocking it down a star, but the destination is definitely worth the journey to get there: I can think of few books that end quite as satisfyingly.

In the course of Brady Udall's high-spirited, inexhaustibly inventive novel, Edgar survives not just this bizarre . Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

In the course of Brady Udall's high-spirited, inexhaustibly inventive novel, Edgar survives not just this bizarre accident, but a hellish boarding school for Native American orphans, a well-meaning but wildly dysfunctional Mormon foster family, and the loss of most on the illusions that are supposed to make life bearable. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

In the course of Brady Udall's high-spirited, inexhaustibly inventive novel . the author and discovered his acclaimed novel "The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint". I would advise my more sensitive friends in the book club to avoid it.

In the course of Brady Udall's high-spirited, inexhaustibly inventive novel, Edgar survives not just this bizarre accident, but a hellish boarding school for Native American orphans, a well-meaning but wildly dysfunctional Mormon foster-family, and the loss of most of the illusions that are supposed to make life bearable. Edgar Mint is an authentic and sympathetic character.

Your guide toexceptional books.

The introduction and discussion questions that follow are designed to enhance your group's discussion of Brady Udall's extraordinary first novel, The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint. Your guide toexceptional books. BookBrowse seeks out and recommends the best in contemporary fiction and nonfiction-books that not only engage and entertain but also deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us. Newsletter.

Items related to The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel In the course of Brady Udall's high-spirited, inexhaustibly inventive novel, Edgar survives not just this bizarre accident, but a hellish boarding school for Native.

Items related to The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel. Brady Udall The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel. ISBN 13: 9780393341645. If I could tell you only one thing about my life it would be this: when I was seven years old the mailman ran over my head. As formative events go, nothing else comes close. In the course of Brady Udall's high-spirited, inexhaustibly inventive novel, Edgar survives not just this bizarre accident, but a hellish boarding school for Native American orphans, a well-meaning but wildly dysfunctional Mormon foster-family, and the loss of most of the illusions that are supposed to make life bearable.

Books related to The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel.

As he is shunted from the hospital to a school for delinquents to a Mormon foster family, comedy, pain, and trouble accompany Edgar through a string of larger-than-life experiences. Through it all, readers will root for this irresistible innocent who never truly loses heart and whose quest for the mailman leads him to an unexpected home. Books related to The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint: A Novel.

423pp, Jonathan Cape, £10. For all the occasional unexpectedness of its prose style, plot and characterisation, the atmosphere that rises above Brady Udall's second novel is intensely familiar

423pp, Jonathan Cape, £10. For all the occasional unexpectedness of its prose style, plot and characterisation, the atmosphere that rises above Brady Udall's second novel is intensely familiar. Not quite magic realism, a notch or two up from the tall stories of an E Annie Proulx, it is, with its evocations of parched landscapes and out-of-kilter lives, essentially an American atmosphere. A British writer who tried to navigate this kind of path would, you fear, fall flat on his or her face before you could say the words "Mason-Dixon line"

Barry Udall guides us through thirty years of Edgar Mint's life and leaves us wanting more. Brady Udall obviously knows Indian people and is familiar with some of our life stories. I would recommend this book to all Native people.

Barry Udall guides us through thirty years of Edgar Mint's life and leaves us wanting more. The Dickensian plot twists and resolutions underline Edgar's superhuman resiliency, as well as his heartbreaking vulnerability. It's impossible not to love this kid, and to want to be the one who makes everything OK. There are several blanks to fill in in Edgar Mint's life, in time and space.

"An ingenious tale [that] takes its heart from Dickens and its soul from America’s great outlaw West." ―Elle

Half Apache and mostly orphaned, Edgar Presley Mint’s trials begin on an Arizona reservation at the age of seven, when the mailman’s jeep accidentally runs over his head. As he is shunted from the hospital to a school for delinquents to a Mormon foster family, comedy, pain, and trouble accompany Edgar through a string of larger-than-life experiences. Through it all, readers will root for this irresistible innocent who never truly loses heart and whose quest for the mailman leads him to an unexpected home.

Comments

Ericaz Ericaz
Best first paragraph ever! The first pages were so horrifying, it took me three days to read "The Mailman" and move on to "The Rodeo." An endearing character who endures many difficulties, I could not help becoming invested in Edgar and rooting for him. I don't know why it took me so long to find this book, but I'm glad I did. I am a member of another tribe and felt I needed to read this book. Udall is a masterful storyteller and this is literary fiction at its best.
Kigabar Kigabar
Having heard a wonderful short story about a pet armadillo on NPR by Brady Udall I was anxious to read his novel. While I have read comparisons to the story telling of John Irving I also thought there was some of the magical realism of Gabriel Garcia Marquez in this delightful saga of a young boy who suffers a devastating accident and lives his life wondering about the unfortunate fellow who caused the event. Although bogging down a little in describing the repetitive abuse Edgar suffers along the way, the story arrives at a surprising and satisfying ending, something I wish more books I read didI I like Mr. Udall and look forward to his next novel!
greatest greatest
If you liked the book "A Prayer for Owen Meany" you will love this book. Poor Edgar cannot get a break - which makes for a good read. A satisfying story. Some of Edgar's misadventures were almost too hard to read - but I persevered and was rewarded at the end.
Karon Karon
After reading a review of Udall's newest novel "The Loneliest Polygamist", I was intrigued, did a little research regarding the author and discovered his acclaimed novel "The Miracle Life of Edgar Mint".

Edgar Mint is an authentic and sympathetic character. He is lovable. I found myself rooting for him during all the unfortunate events of his young life. Following an accident in which seven-year-old Edgar's head is crushed by a mail jeep, Edgar is brought back to life and the "miracles" continue.

This book is peopled with unique, strange and curious characters. Dr. Barry Pinkley is definitely one of the oddest characters. He reminds me of "Lolita's" Humbert, although the motivations behind Barry's obsession with Edgar are apparently different.

Udall, a fabulous writer, creates an essentially depressing story and yet never lets the reader get depressed. There is always hope. Edgar is always hopeful.

The writing is witty, irreverent, and even funny. It is also crass and vulgar and describes some of the more dark realities of our world. I would advise my more sensitive friends in the book club to avoid it. Everyone else should find it, read it and enjoy.
Ventelone Ventelone
This beautifully written story could have merited 5 stars, but I found myself skipping ahead until it grabbed me again--which it always did.
Umi Umi
Edgar Mint is the child of America's shame. Born of an ignorant caucasian wanderer and an Indian girl barely out of her teens, he belongs nowhere, is loved by noone, and stands as a mute indictment of a world filled with hypocrisy, brutality, and despair. There's something about Edgar, though, which enables him to give and receive redemption all throughout his life. He cannot, will not die. His is a life filled with resurrections.
They occur with alarming regularity. In the opening pages of Barry Udall's remarkable new novel, six-year-old Edgar has his head run over in an accident with a mail truck. Surviving this catastrophe through the ministrations of a darkly obsessive doctor, Edgar spends his formative years in the warm coccoon of a hospital ward, the hellish confines of a boarding school for Indian children, and finally on the periphery of a well-meaning but troubled Mormon family.
Barry Udall guides us through thirty years of Edgar Mint's life and leaves us wanting more. The Dickensian plot twists and resolutions underline Edgar's superhuman resiliency, as well as his heartbreaking vulnerability. It's impossible not to love this kid, and to want to be the one who makes everything OK. There are several blanks to fill in in Edgar Mint's life, in time and space. It seems like everyone's missing something about this boy.
As he wanders through life looking for someone he knows he's lost, Edgar survives more physical traumas, only to face the death of those he comes to love over and over, in a cycle linked to his intricate destiny. Edgar's journey is a process of coming to terms with loss, and finding himself. In so doing, he brings many others back to themselves as well.
GoodBuyMyFriends GoodBuyMyFriends
As an enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, Oregon, I related to this book. As an infant, I was taken out of the backseat of my parent's car while they were in a tavern. Like Edgar and many other Indian children, I was made a ward of the state. I lived through being placed in a German foster family, an orphanage run by nuns, and various other children's institutions. I found the characters whom Edgar encounters, to be very realistic and believable. The real life stories of many Native people seem common place to us but would seem fantastic to most middle class Americans. I can only remember seeing my parents in their coffins, I don't remember them alive. I have no baby pictures. Like many Indian children I was physically abused by those paid to raise me. Considering the history of genocide practiced by the U.S. government and the horror of the foster care system, it is a miracle that any of us survived. Brady Udall obviously knows Indian people and is familiar with some of our life stories. I would recommend this book to all Native people.
What a terrific survivor of abuse story. If there is any truth to the conditions of these places where the Indian children wound up, wow. How anyone could get through that and still be in any way normal is amazing. Great story, I read it two times now, and can highly recommend it as an engaging saga of a young boys life and how he dealt with the awful things that happened to him. I think the ending was a good one; that's not always the case in a book like this one.