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eBook A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel (Benjamin Weaver) ePub

eBook A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel (Benjamin Weaver) ePub

by David Liss

  • ISBN: 0804119120
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: David Liss
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Later printing edition (January 30, 2001)
  • Pages: 480
  • ePub book: 1656 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1823 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 552

Description

The book won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel. He wrote A Conspiracy of Paper while pursuing a P. in English literature at Columbia.

The book won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel. Although paper money had been invented centuries earlier in China, its use did not become widespread in Europe until after the middle of the 17th century. Apparently, the book did so well that he turned to full-time writing and never finished his dissertation.

A Conspiracy of Paper is a historical-mystery novel by David Liss, set in London in the period leading up to the bursting of the South Sea Bubble in 1720. The novel's story is told in the form of a first-person memoir penned by Benjamin Weaver (born Lienzo), London-born son of Portuguese Sephardic Jewish parents. After a successful career in bare-knuckle boxing, Weaver has found a new calling as a y equivalent to a modern private investigator.

A Conspiracy of Paper book. In Benjamin Weaver, author David Liss has created an irresistibly appealing protagonist, one who parlays his knowledge of the emerging stock market into a new kind of detective work. His quest leads him to wrongs he didn't know were possible, and that he cares a lot about righting nobody could then, and nobody can no. .because it's all to do with human greed and viciousness.

Benjamin Weaver investigates a crime of the most personal sort: the mysterious death of his estranged father, a notorious stockjobber

Benjamin Weaver investigates a crime of the most personal sort: the mysterious death of his estranged father, a notorious stockjobber. To find the answers, Weaver must contend with a desperate prostitute who knows too much about his past, and relatives who remind him of his alienation from the Jewish faith. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

You, I presume, are Benjamin Weaver, he began at last in a voice that cracked with . The Day of Atonement. The Twelfth Enchantment: A Novel.

You, I presume, are Benjamin Weaver, he began at last in a voice that cracked with uncertainty. He hardly noticed my nod of acknowledgment. I come on a serious matter. 172. 0. Published: 2008. Other author's books: The Day of Atonement. The Devil’s Company: A Novel. Paleo, The Doomsday Prepper.

Электронная книга "A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel", David Liss

Электронная книга "A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel", David Liss. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In David Liss's ambitious first novel, A Conspiracy of Paper,. A Conspiracy of Paper: A Novel (Benjamin Weaver). Book in the Benjamin Weaver Series). Select Format: Hardcover.

Liss David - скачать бесплатно все книги автора Liss's first novel, A Conspiracy of Paper, was sketched on the wide canvas of 18th-century London '.

Liss David - скачать бесплатно все книги автора. Книги 1-14 из 14. A Spectacle Of Corruption. Жанр: Современная проза. Der Exboxer und Privatdetektiv Benjamin Weaver wird durch einen erpresserischen Trick in die Dienste des H?ndlers Jerome Cobb gezwungen. Da auch das Wohlergehen seiner engsten Freunde in Cobbs H?nden liegt, muss Weaver mit dem skrupellosen Gesch?ftsmann zusammenarbeiten. Liss's first novel, A Conspiracy of Paper, was sketched on the wide canvas of 18th-century London 's multilayered society. This one, in contrast, is set in the confined world of 17th-century Amsterdam 's immigrant Jewish community.

A Conspiracy of Paper. The historical thriller of the year. Benjamin Weaver is an outsider in eighteenth-century London: a Jew among Christians; a ruffian among aristocrats; a retired pugilist who, hired by London’s gentry, travels through the criminal underworld in pursuit of debtors and thieves.

In Benjamin Weaver, author David Liss has created an irresistibly appealing protagonist, one who parlays . A Conspiracy of Paper is exciting, intelligent, and witty-a rare combination in historical novels. It is rich in intriguing detail and peopled with fascinating characters.

In Benjamin Weaver, author David Liss has created an irresistibly appealing protagonist, one who parlays his knowledge of the emerging stock market into a new kind of detective work. Recommended enthusiastically.

Benjamin Weaver, a Jew and an ex-boxer, is an outsider in eighteenth-century London, tracking down debtors and felons for aristocratic clients. The son of a wealthy stock trader, he lives estranged from his family—until he is asked to investigate his father’s sudden death. Thus Weaver descends into the deceptive world of the English stock jobbers, gliding between coffee houses and gaming houses, drawing rooms and bordellos. The more Weaver uncovers, the darker the truth becomes, until he realizes that he is following too closely in his father’s footsteps—and they just might lead him to his own grave. An enthralling historical thriller, A Conspiracy of Paper will leave readers wondering just how much has changed in the stock market in the last three hundred years. . . .

Comments

Anarius Anarius
I loved this book. A mystery set in the Jewish slums of London with an intriguing lead character, a former bareknuckle boxer and a Sephardic Jew of Portuguese ancestry he is held in double contempt by the men he works for as a thief-taker (he might be the first private I, LOL). The subplot of his integration into the Jewish community in London after rejecting it years before and the background of the first financial bubble when stocks were something brand new were really well done. The historical references and the glimpses into a London that is long gone were great and the mystery at the heart of the story was almost as good, but this is a character driven book and I loved the lead. A great read and a high recommendation from me for both history lovers and mystery lovers and those, like me, who love a helping of both.
Steamy Ibis Steamy Ibis
Take a wild ride to early 18th-century England. You'll meet a famous Jewish boxer, the men behind the South Sea Bubble, and the world's first modern crime lord. Welcome to David Liss' carefully constructed account of A Conspiracy of Paper. The book won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel.

Rampant financial skulduggery: the South Sea Bubble
The opening decades of the 18th century in England were an era of rapid change, like our own time. Although paper money had been invented centuries earlier in China, its use did not become widespread in Europe until after the middle of the 17th century. The Bank of England issued the first banknotes only in 1695. Within two decades, when A Conspiracy of Paper is set, speculation had begun to swirl around the new paper financial instruments, especially shares in the early joint-stock companies. Most of the "stock-jobbers" (today's stockbrokers) who peddled these shares were an unscrupulous lot. Fraud was rampant. And nowhere was the speculation wilder than in the shares of the South Sea Company. The turmoil on the Exchange culminated in 1720 in the world's first stock market crash. This was the event that came to be known as the South Sea Bubble.

A crime-ridden city without police
A Conspiracy of Paper is set in 1719, when the population of London was approximately 600,000. (There were only a handful of larger cities in the world, and only in Asia.) Most of the city's residents lived in squalor. Crime was rampant, murder common. There were no police other than the thugs who roamed the city to grab citizens and haul them off to jail for generous awards, usually for not paying their bills. Anyone who lives today in a modern city would find the sights and smells—especially the smells—of London in that era to be insufferable. And all these conditions enter the picture in abundant detail in this skillfully written historical novel.

A famous Jewish boxer
Ben Weaver was born and raised the son of a wealthy stock-jobber named Samuel Lienzo. The family are what today we know as Sephardic Jews (although the term used then was Iberian). He left home as a teenager, changed his name, and turned to a life as a boxer, becoming known as the Lion of Judah. When injury ended his boxing career, Ben turned to crime. Years later, reformed, he has earned a living as a "thief-taker," capturing thieves and delivering them to the constables for a reward. But, unlike Jonathan Wild, a competitor who dominates the city, Ben is honest and reliable. However, he is constantly forced to prove himself because of rampant anti-Semitism and the terrible reputation of Jewish stock-jobbers like his father.

A fateful coincidence
Writing thirty-five years after the fact, Ben relates how he was approached by a prosperous gentleman named William Balfour and asked to investigate the death of his father. The elder Balfour was determined to have committed suicide. And, in what is surely no coincidence, Ben's own father had died not a day earlier when run over in the street by a carriage. Lienzo and Balfour's father had done business together. The assignment sets Ben off on a fraught investigation that carries him to all corners of the city—and threatens to upend the fortunes of the South Sea Company and the Bank of England.

The first modern crime lord
Although most of the characters in A Conspiracy of Paper are entirely fictitious, both Ben Weaver and Jonathan wild are based on historical figures. Ben is modeled on a Jewish boxer of the period named Daniel Mendoza, and Liss notes that Jonathan Wild, who controlled many of London's criminals early in the 18th century, "is generally acknowledged as the first modern crime lord."

About the author
David Liss is the author of eleven novels, most of them historical fiction. He wrote A Conspiracy of Paper while pursuing a Ph.D. in English literature at Columbia. Apparently, the book did so well that he turned to full-time writing and never finished his dissertation.
Kanal Kanal
The author has a tremendous gift for language, not only in a current context but writing in the manner and language common to 17th century London. While it is by no means a "Sherlock Holmes" mystery (although there are parallels in terms of deductive behavior on the part of the lead character, Benjamin Weaver), when reading it I was enjoying the sheer pleasure of the more mannered conversations, the lower class idioms, descriptions of London's seamier neighborhoods, and the interactions of the various characters. It was a definite page-turner both from the plot twists and turns and also from just the sheer enjoyment of an excellent writer and linguist at work. The plot is confusing, but then again it was confusing to Benjamin Weaver as well as he chased many false leads - so no complaints about that. Benjamin is dogged in his pursuit of those behind the murder of his Father, and as other reviewers have noted the answer lies somewhere in the financial world whose primary players are the Bank of England and the South Seas Company. There is really no need to have knowledge of stock trading, although that terminology is used throughout, but there are parallels to current financial markets in terms of how the value of stocks are driven as much by public perception as they are by financial fundamentals. Bottom line it's a great mystery and a great read. I will definitely read more books by this author. Highly recommend
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
This is really an outstanding book, well worth the money. The story takes place in London in 1719 when shares in the South Sea Company were well on their way to their high point (and subsequent crash). The story revolves around the rivalry between the South Sea Company and the Bank of England through adventures of a Jewish boxer turned private investigator hired to look into suspicious deaths. This is itself would normally suffice for a standard historical mystery. In this case, however, the author has an exceptional knowledge of the time, place and language of the story and this what makes the book outstanding. The book is written in a simplified form of 18th Century English baroque, and the simplification is masterful: the clutter is eliminated, but enough remains to emphasize the nature of the period while providing the necessary clarity.
Given the subject, there are also some lengthy explanations about money and banking and stocks in 1719. Some readers may find this tedious, but they are worth the attention and close reading these subjects require, as this is the time when our monetary system was established, to say nothing of the economic foundation of modern Great Britain. The author appears to be somewhat doubtful about the benefits of the new system, but with hindsight we know that the introduction of paper money was unavoidable.