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eBook Human Voices ePub

eBook Human Voices ePub

by Penelope Fitzgerald

  • ISBN: 0786223065
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Penelope Fitzgerald
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Thorndike Pr (March 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 202
  • ePub book: 1694 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1178 kb
  • Other: azw mobi lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 505

Description

The human voices of Penelope Fitzgerald’s novel are those of the BBC in the first years of the World War II, the time when the Concert Hall was turned into a dormitory for both sexes, the whole building became a target From the Booker Prizewinning author of ‘Offshore’ and ‘The Blue Flower’; a funny, touching, authentic story of life at Broadcasting House.

As is evident in this acute passage, and in virtually every other in Human Voices, Fitzgerald can pivot from sorrow to humor by way of pessimism and desire and then back again

Ships from and sold by StrawberrySales. Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). As is evident in this acute passage, and in virtually every other in Human Voices, Fitzgerald can pivot from sorrow to humor by way of pessimism and desire and then back again. Penelope Fitzgerald's human comedy always rewards rereading.

The human voices of Penelope Fitzgerald’s novel are those of the BBC in the first years of the World War II, the time when the Concert Hall was turned into a dormitory for both sexes, the whole building became a target for enemy bombers, and in the BBC – as elsewhere – some had to fail.

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Penelope Fitzgerald won the Booker Prize in England for her 1978 novel "Offshore," but her reputation was slower to. .I found Human Voices harder to "get into" than the other four Fitzgerald novels I've read. And it seemed to have more stock characters.

Penelope Fitzgerald won the Booker Prize in England for her 1978 novel "Offshore," but her reputation was slower to develop in this country. However, it ends more convincingly (less abruptly) than some of her other novels.

Penelope Fitzgerald, the Booker Prize-winning author of 'Offshore' and 'The Blue Flower', turns her attention to the .

Penelope Fitzgerald, the Booker Prize-winning author of 'Offshore' and 'The Blue Flower', turns her attention to the remarkable life of the Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones. The human voices of Penelope Fitzgerald's novel are those of the BBC in the first years of the World War II, the time when the Concert Hall was turned into a dormitory for both sexes, the whole building became a target for enemy bombers, and in the BBC â? as elsewhere â? some had to fail and some had to die.

Human Voices is a 1980 novel by the British author Penelope Fitzgerald. It relates the fictionalised experiences of a group of BBC employees at Broadcasting House, London, in 1940 when the city was under nightly attack from the Luftwaffe's high explosive, incendiary, and parachute bombs

by. Penelope Fitzgerald.

by. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on September 26, 2012.

Penelope Fitzgerald, brilliant Oxford student and already a clever if unpublished writer, was employed as a BBC features producer at the end of 1940 – the year in which Human Voices is set. She may not have been at the bottom of the pile but neither was she part of an elite graduate corps that the BBC brilliantly recruited and exploited in the last decades of the century. In 1940 Fitzgerald could hardly have expected anything senior or with real prospects. The BBC had not yet discovered the merits of young female talent.

a Penelope Fitzgerald novel is like being taken for a ride in a peculiar kind of car. Everything is of top quality - the engine, the coachwork and the interior all fill you with confidence. Then, after a mile or so, someone throws the steering-wheel out of the window. and ironic, funny and humane, Fitzgerald is a wonderful, wonderful writer. all the novelists of the last quarter-century, she has the most unarguable claim on greatness

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Comments

Malodred Malodred
This is a lovely, crisp novel, but the Kindle edition is absolutely riddled with typographical errors. One of the worst scanning jobs I've ever encountered--an insult to readers and to a very distinguished writer.
Modigas Modigas
Story focuses on emotions and day to day struggles of BBC staff during World War II, which I found engrossing, but it would have been better if a little more attention had been paid to what was going on in England outside their tightly knit group.
HappyLove HappyLove
An incredible distillation of a time and place. A glimpse into war focusing on the day to day rather than the drama. Hilarious, fascinating, and vivid.
Jay Jay
Reading this book brought home to me the realization that eccentric characters can be drawn at several different skill levels. All too often eccentric characters are composed of clichés, so that the character simply becomes representative of a type. In "Human Voices," however, Fitzgerald manages to convey a hilarious degree of eccentricity in a couple of characters while still maintaining their distinct personality traits. It's quite a feat.

The action takes place at the BBC during the German Blitzkriegs of London. The war is the looming backdrop for this skillfully rendered tale of a few lives struggling to bring the truth to England during its great crisis. It's quite well done, and it's always comforting to spend some time with Fitzgerald's unique intelligence.
Ffyan Ffyan
I wrote this review for the Philadelphia Inquirer.
Penelope Fitzgerald won the Booker Prize in England for her 1978 novel "Offshore," but her reputation was slower to develop in this country. Over the past dozen years, her elegant, understated novels have won enthusiastic reviews and a small but appreciative audience, which has sufficed to keep them tenaciously in print. When "The Blue Flower" won the National Book Critics Circle Award last year, however, Fitzgerald suddenly became a popular success. Heartened by this, Houghton Mifflin has been reissuing several of her earlier novels (in paperback only, unfortunately), and "Human Voices," originally published in 1980, now appears in this country for the first time.
Set in the summer of 1940, when England was undergoing daily bombardment and German invasion seemed imminent, the novel focuses on the BBC's Broadcasting House, which produced the Home News six times a day even as bombs fell over London. While civilians cope with adversity through self-denial and recycling ("The nation defended itself by counting large numbers of small things into separate containers"), the workers at BH deal with anxiety, depression, and worry over loved ones as they fulfill their schedule of news and features.
This sounds like a recipe for a conventional novel about British determination and pluck, but Fitzgerald is in fact doing something more interesting. She notes that Broadcasting House followed a policy of offering truth rather than propaganda -- "Without prompting, the BBC had decided that truth was more important than consolation, and, in the long run, would be more effective" -- but then adds: "Truth ensures trust, but not victory, or even happiness." The major theme of Fitzgerald's fiction, the inadvisability of trying to avoid hurtful truths, can be glimpsed in these two sentences.
This sounds pretty earnest, but "Human Voices" is in fact a deft and very funny novel, astute and sharply observed -- even rather consoling. The beleaguered BBC, operating like "a cross between a civil service, a powerful moral force, and an amateur theatrical company that wasn't too sure where next week's money was coming from," converts its concert-hall into a dormitory for the day when London is invaded and employees seal themselves into the building. As things turn out, the most action the space sees happens the evening when a young assistant crawls into a dark cubicle and goes into labor.
The cast revolves around two middle-aged and unhappy men: Sam Brooks, the Director of Recorded Programmes, and Jeff Haggard, the Director of Programme Planning. (As though to convey the institution's sometimes irritating fussiness, the author usually refers to them simply as RPD and DPP.) With the assistance of a staff of surprisingly understanding teenaged assistants (one of them, finding a letter from her boyfriend largely blacked-out by the censor, thinks: "What a job having to go through other people's personal letters . . . they must feel uncomfortable, you had to pity them"), they stoically confront the various crises that beset the Corporation, such as a French general who has just escaped his collapsing country, and whose request to broadcast an urgent message for the British people the BBC unwisely grants.
Although much of the novel deals with the technical problems involved in recording "human voices," the title is an obvious allusion to Eliot's Prufrock, whom both RPD and DPP resemble. One of them is finally wakened by Eliot's "human voices," but does not (like Prufrock) drown; the other's case is more equivocal.
At times Fitzgerald shows a slightly unsure hand, and readers of her later novels (especially "The Gate of Angels," which shares some features with her present novel) will see where she has elsewhere handled matters a bit more adroitly. This is the only real criticism one can make of the novel, and it is hard to fault a writer for having improved with time. Compact and concise, "Human Voices" is a small gem, and should please new readers almost as much those already familiar with her work.
Wooden Purple Romeo Wooden Purple Romeo
Ms. Fitzgerald actually did work for the BBC during WWII, and while there was at least one annoying trait, I found the book to be her wittiest I have read. My complaint has to do with the use of acronyms; if you worked at the BBC this will not be an issue. But when used liberally, in a compact novel that defines how she writes, there is little time to learn them. "CJ get me AJ the SECDEF, RJ the SECTRES, ASAP, for a get together at MOJ, PDQ...OK? The PPA, and 2 JPA'S, should attend as well." Usually this sort of banter is reserved for a Tom Clancy Novel.
The book ended with a great bang like many of her works, but this time we are not left wondering if the book we are holding is a few pages short. There still is more to unfold for some central characters, but this time the reader decides whether or not to pursue a continuance.
The TRUTH is the mission the BBC is on. To broadcast this and nothing else, not even speeches by The King that have been mended to delete his stutter. However in one of the funniest passages of the book, a French General feels compelled to share the "truth" with England and the English he so loves. Fortunately for both country and citizens alike, and to the amusement of the PM, he had the plugs pulled upon him.
Since Ms. Fitzgerald did work at the BBC, it offers an additional avenue for thought. Simply stated, how much is true, how many of these people actually lived, and how much was pure fiction. It is a tribute to her writing that the reader is unsure. By writing as she has, whether in a complimentary manner, or unflattering, I doubt some of the subjects would recognize themselves.
Another novel, without repetition, that demonstrates the vast skill this woman commanded.