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eBook The German Money ePub

eBook The German Money ePub

by Lev Raphael

  • ISBN: 096795200X
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Lev Raphael
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Leapfrog Press; First Edition edition (September 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 206
  • ePub book: 1960 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1853 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi lit docx
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 944

Description

Raphael applies his talents as a suspense writer (he is the author of five mystery novels in addition to the short story collection Dancing on Tisha B'Av) to this unconventional Holocaust novel, a family drama about the upheaval caused by a million-dollar legacy of German reparations money. The passive, introspective narrator, Paul Menkus, is a 42-year-old Michigan librarian who travels home to Manhattan after a heart attack claims his mother, Rose, a Holocaust survivor.

Lev Raphael is a daring writer-one who will not be -restrained by genre, but who tells his story with all the tools at his command. Lev Raphael is a daring writer-one who will not be -restrained by genre, but who tells his story with all the tools at his command. The German Money "combines all of Raphael's estimable talents, delivering an emotional thriller about a totally believable contemporary family coming to terms with fifty years of silence.

Praise for The German Money. Lev Raphael writes of love, redemption, and revenge with an unflinching honesty that is rare and beautiful. This is an exquisite portrayal of a troubled family, of three siblings each affected differently, but painfully, by their mother’s past. Upon her mysterious death, the children face shocking questions. a gift as cynical as it is generous. Lev Raphael’s new novel is a powerful, haunting and erotic tale.

Lev Raphael's latest book, The German Money, is as wonderful as it is complex. The main character, Paul, is an intelligent individual who slowly uncovers layers of intrigue involving a dark family secret. When his mother dies, Paul is surprised to learn that she has left him a large sum of money.

The German Money book. Denise Bulpitt rated it liked it May 08, 2014. Jenna rated it really liked it Jun 20, 2013. Bethany rated it it was ok Sep 21, 2011. Lisa Hofmann rated it really liked it Mar 08, 2016.

The German money : a novel. by. Raphael, Lev. Publication date. Leapfrog Press ; St. Paul, Minn. Distributed in the . by Consortium Book Sales and Distribution. Jews, Children of Holocaust survivors, Mothers, Jewish families. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

A fictional take on Raphael's chronicles of the lives of Holocaust survivors' children. A constricted tale of unresolved mourning only partly redeemed by the clever twist Raphael (Burning Down the House, 2001, et. saves for the end. Pub Date: Sept.

The German Money combines all of Raphael's estimable talents, delivering an emotional thriller . Lev Raphael's new novel is a powerful, haunting and romantic tale

The German Money combines all of Raphael's estimable talents, delivering an emotional thriller about a totally believable contemporary family coming to terms with fifty years of silence. Edmund White, Author of The Married Man. "Lev Raphael's new novel is a powerful, haunting and romantic tale. The stunning narrative builds to a shocking denouement and kept me turning pages faster and faster to learn the truth. Linda Fairstein, Bestselling Author of The Bone Vault and The Dead House.

"Lev Raphael is a daring writer—one who will not be -restrained by genre, but who tells his story with all the tools at his command. The German Money combines all of Raphael’s estimable talents, delivering an emotional thriller about a totally believable contemporary family coming to terms with fifty years of silence."—Edmund White

Best known for Dancing on Tisha B’Av, the groundbreaking story collection exploring the lives of children of Holocaust survivors, Lev Raphael is also the author of five popular mysteries. Now he combines his talents in a story of emotional suspense.

Paul has spent his life running—from New York, the city of his birth; from his beautiful beshert; from contact with his own siblings; but mostly from his mother, a Holocaust survivor of inexplicable coldness. Upon her mysterious death, the children face shocking questions. What caused her to die? Why did she divide their inheritance so that Paul, the least favorite son, was singled out to receive the most, the dreaded "German money,"a bequest of a million dollars accrued from German reparations to survivors . . . a gift as cynical as it is generous.

"Lev Raphael’s new novel is a powerful, haunting and erotic tale. The stunning narrative builds to a shocking -denouement and kept me turning pages faster and faster to learn the truth."—Linda Fairstein

Lev Raphael is the author of thirteen books and known internationally as an insightful chronicler of the lives of the children of Holocaust survivors. Winner of the Lambda Literary Award, among many prizes, his short works have appeared in two dozen anthologies, including American Jewish Fiction: A Century of Stories. He is a book critic for National Public Radio and mysteries columnist for the Detroit Free Press.

Comments

Ishnsius Ishnsius
I've avoided reading anything connected with the Holocaust for many, many years. I guess I had way too much of it growing up. But since this one is written by Lev Raphael, so thought I would cautiously give it a try.

I was hooked by the time I finished the sample, although while reading this story of this dysfunctional family, survivor mother, institutionalised non-survivor father and squabbling adult children (it starts with her death and funeral), I still wasn't sure what I "thought of it" for quite a long time, although the writing drew me in more and more with every word.

The struggle was worth it. A book that packs a startling punch, in a subject that has, IMO as 2nd generation has been done to death.

Highly, highly recommended.
misery misery
There should be a statue of limitations on complaining about our parents and what they did or didn't do to us or for us. By age 30, after we've gotten our noses bloody a few times and wallowed in as much pleasure as our bodies and bank accounts can stand, we may have learned just enough to realize that either our parents knew more than we're willing to admit, or that they were truly hopeless and more to be pitied than to be censured. And that should be it. Time to grant them absolution and move on.
Then, there are the cases like Paul's. His father bore the scars of being orphaned early in his life; his mother was a Holocaust survivor who came to America, married and left her past in Europe. He realizes that they were not the stereotypical Jewish families: "We were anything but lively and outspoken, not a perpetual carnival of conversation at all. Dad could be social and glib, but not with us, never with us. And serious subjects just weren't on our map."
With his sister and brother, Paul grew up in a home ruled by mysteries, subject to his mother's sometimes implacable silences and inexplicable anger. Small wonder he fled the urban jungle of New York City for the wilds of Michigan to escape his past as well. He had hoped he could abandon his Jewish heritage, his fiancé, Valerie, and bury himself in his dead-end job as a university librarian.
But Paul is drawn back to New York City after his mother dies of a heart attack, and he learns that, of his three siblings, he alone would inherit "the German money," the compensation his mother collected and never spent. The amount, nearly a million dollars, creates a split in the family, and Paul -- beset with a form of survivor's guilt -- becomes consumed with learning why he was chosen.
But unlike Nick Hoffman, the college professor turned detective in Lev Raphael's witty and acerbic mystery series, Paul is no investigator. His quest to divine the secret of the German money moves in fits and starts, in between coping with his sister's claims on his inheritance, his father's Alzheimer's and his attempts to rekindle his relationship with Valerie, who, it turns out, has some secrets of her own.
Raphael has written short stories and novels dealing with Jewish, Holocaust and crime, and "The German Money" can be seen as a distillation of all of them. He lets the story unfold slowly, giving the reader time to become acquainted with the characters before reaching deep into the emotional undertow and bring to the surface the tensions that bind and divide a family.
Paul's journey into his past doesn't reveal everything, and Raphael resists tidying all the loose ends, giving "The German Money" a necessary messiness that reminds us that ties of blood and kinship are not keys into the realm of perfect knowledge. Sometimes, we simply have to go on as best we can, and let the secrets be.
Ariseym Ariseym
I've been promising myself this treat for months, and today was the day I put everything else aside to let myself be swept into a world of Lev Raphael's creation. Every family is its own world, and I found the characters that people this one both strange and believable. I quickly became invested in them; Raphael does a great job of making you feel the emotional emptiness of this family, how truly bereft they are. And the writing itself is rich and tasty, like verbal umami. It's a wild emotional ride: plenty of sin, plenty of remorse, even some possibility of redemption. Plus a turn in the plot that I didn't see coming, even after reading the reviews that alluded to it. I've read some of Raphael's other mysteries and loved them, but this was a wholly different experience. It was like a web, delicate and strong, and I thoroughly enjoyed being caught in it.
Unirtay Unirtay
I don't think I can add much to the Washington Post review of Lev Raphael's THE GERMAN MONEY. It is an outstanding book and deserves all the praise it has been receiving. Some DorothyLers may not pick this book up since it isn't classified as a mystery, but it contains the elements of the greatest mysteries of all...the human heart and psyche.
Paul, has been almost estranged from his family for years. He moved from New York to Ann Arbor and the fact that he prefers Michigan to New York City is baffling to them. His two siblings have learned to cope in their own way with the bluster of their father and the seeming coldness of their mother, a Holocaust survivor. When Paul returns, shortly after his mother's death, he is astonished to learn that he inherits "the German money", restitution paid to Holocaust victims. He can not understand the motive for this since his mother never touched the money even though it was invested and grew to a tidy sum and certainly never showed him any love or affection.
Haunting and unforgettable, THE GERMAN MONEY is even better than I expected from Raphael, and having read his novel, short stories and JOURNEYS & ARRIVALS, I did expect a lot.