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eBook The Girl With Brown Fur: Tales  Stories ePub

eBook The Girl With Brown Fur: Tales Stories ePub

by Stacey Levine

  • ISBN: 0984213341
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Stacey Levine
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Starcherone Books (April 19, 2011)
  • Pages: 175
  • ePub book: 1942 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1256 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf docx lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 653

Description

Stacey Levine: Stacey Levine is the author of My Horse and Other Stories (PEN/West Fiction Award, 1994) . Tales may be a residue from childhood

Stacey Levine: Stacey Levine is the author of My Horse and Other Stories (PEN/West Fiction Award, 1994) and the novels Dra- and Frances Johnson (finalist, Washington State Book Award, 2005). Tales may be a residue from childhood. They lived in a more dimensional world than a story that is a reportage, or a story that is about something, or that is current in the world of reporting.

Books, and Stacey Levine's The Girl with Brown Fur from Starcherone Books, itself an imprint of Dzanc Books

Take for example two volumes I recently had the chance to look through, Heather Fowler's Suspended Heart from Aqueous Books, and Stacey Levine's The Girl with Brown Fur from Starcherone Books, itself an imprint of Dzanc Books. And this is even more pronounced with Levine's book, which frankly just a week after finishing I can barely even remember anything about, other than a vague recollection of finishing each story and thinking, "Really? Was that it?"

Thankfully, Levine's stories have a refreshing lack of respect for reality. The Believer Levine's crisp stories similarly find excitement and transformation as they chase down their fantastical plots.

Thankfully, Levine's stories have a refreshing lack of respect for reality. The Girl with Brown Fur won't be everyone's cup of tea, but the adventurous will enjoy following Levine's breadcrumb trails, even if that means getting a little bit lost. Devers, Time Out New York In her first short fiction collection since My Horse and Other Stories, Stacey Levine gives us twenty-eight new, feral, untamable stories, in myriad.

Stacey Levine: Stacey Levine is the author of My Horse and Other Stories (PEN/West Fiction Award, 1994) and the novels . Destination, rates & speeds. 6. The Girl with Brown Fur: Tales & Stories. Published by MacAdam/ Cage, San Francisco (2009).

Stacey Levine: Stacey Levine is the author of My Horse and Other Stories (PEN/West Fiction Award, 1994) and the novels Dra- and Frances Johnson (finalist, Washington State Book Award, 2005).

In "The Girl With Brown Fur" Stacey Levine has invented stories that will thrill readers of literary fiction who hunger for an innovative American voice

In "The Girl With Brown Fur" Stacey Levine has invented stories that will thrill readers of literary fiction who hunger for an innovative American voice. No two of these fictions are alike, and yet in each, an otherworldly beauty shines through as Levine probes the basic human desire for connection. In "The World of Barry" a wife lauds the comforts that come from being married to a seemingly ordinary man named Barry.

Levine’s latest book presents a gathering of, as she specifies, tales and stories

Levine’s latest book presents a gathering of, as she specifies, tales and stories. In The Girl, a brilliantly unnerving story set in an old hotel, Levine fuses gothic spookiness with deadpan angst to portray a lost soul obsessed with a frail little girl across the hall, who wears a necklace of mouse-shaped beads and a leash held by a severely tall man. The narrator is one of Levine’s many twitchy, glum, and abruptly dangerous individuals given to aberrant self-justification, seizures, lethargy, and metaphysical crises in which they doubt their very existences.

Stacey Levine, The Girl with Brown Fur: Tales and Stories. Visit us online at ww. tarcherone. We are a signatory to the Book Industry Treatise on Responsible Paper Use and use postconsumer recycled fiber paper in our books. Janet Mitchell, The Creepy Girl and other stories. Alissa Nutting, Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls. Aimee Parkison, Woman with Dark Horses: Stories. Ted Pelton, Endorsed by Jack Chapeau 2 an even greater extent. Thaddeus Rutkowski, Haywire. Starcherone Books is an independently operated imprint of Dzanc Books. The Dzanc Books eBook Club.

STACEY LEVINE is the author of four books, including The Girl with Brown: Fur-Tales and Stories. A Pushcart Prize nominee, she has also received the PEN/West Fiction Award, the Stranger Genius Award for Literature, and other honors. FRANCES MCCUE is a poet and prose writer.

Her new collection of modern fairy tales, The Girl with Brown Fur . Levine’s crisp stories similarly find excitement and transformation as they chase down their fantastical plots.

Her new collection of modern fairy tales, The Girl with Brown Fur, similarly transports readers to absurd and surreal landscapes. Some of the pieces here are riffs on wonderland classics: In The Bean, a nod to Jack and the Beanstalk, we get to know an underachieving, depressed legume who has yet to find his calling in life. The Girl with Brown Fur won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but the adventurous will enjoy following Levine’s bread-crumb trails, even if that means getting a little bit lost.

"Amid alarming depictions of domestic misery and perversion, strange metamorphoses, and imperiled nature, as well as the occasional triumphant escape or alliance, Levine declares the death of myth and anticipates the collapse of civilization. But for now, she subtly acknowledges that however deluded, poisoned, and impaired we may be, we will continue to tell and cherish tales and stories as we struggle against lies, brutality, and alienation."—Donna Seamen, Bookforum

The inhabitants of Stacey Levine's stories attempt each of these things and more, with no more success than people who have extramarital affairs or people who buy sports cars. Thankfully, Levine's stories have a refreshing lack of respect for reality.—The Believer

Levine's crisp stories similarly find excitement and transformation as they chase down their fantastical plots. The Girl with Brown Fur won't be everyone's cup of tea, but the adventurous will enjoy following Levine's breadcrumb trails, even if that means getting a little bit lost.—A.N. Devers, Time Out New York

In her first short fiction collection since My Horse and Other Stories, Stacey Levine gives us twenty-eight new, feral, untamable stories, in myriad modes, from laugh-out-loud funny, to Kafka-nightmarish, to lyrical, elegiac, and philosophical.

Stacey Levine is the author of My Horse and Other Stories (PEN/West Fiction Award, 1994) and the novels Dra— and Frances Johnson (finalist, Washington State Book Award, 2005).

Comments

Pad Pad
This book was assigned in my undergraduate creative writing class. From all the books assigned, I learned the most from this book.

The stories constantly seem to be shaken up, leaving you in a new world. This happens every sentence or so.

Why do I not hear about her more?
Dagdatus Dagdatus
(This is my review for The Girl with Brown Fur on Goodreads and was first posted here--[...])

I was really amazed by this book. I think it is important, urgent, necessary, real, and twisted.

When I started reading these "stories and tales" I was also reading Forces of Imagination by Barbara Guest. In Guest's essay "Why They Are Called Tales" my reading of Levine and Guest intertwined.

Here is Guest in "Why They Are Called Tales"--

Tales are stories about stories; they are brought to us from memory and arrive with often an antique finish; they are also arrived from the deep unconscious of a country or place. Tales may be a residue from childhood. They lived in a more dimensional world than a story that is a reportage, or a story that is about something, or that is current in the world of reporting. I believe that a Tale has more magic than a story. It breathes within a separate world of memory or desire. Its remoteness from the center of things is what is endearing about a Tale and it doesn't tell the truth about itself; it tells us what it dreams about. And remember that a Tale arises from the imagination, and this is what makes a Tale live in another dimension.

So from this other dimension we advance the Tale into our dimension, which means the Tale has been on a long trip when it arrives on the page; this means the Tale can be called more dimensional than a story. Which is not to denigrate the story but to say that the Tale has a twist attached to it; so it is a twisted story with a real tail [33].

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Probably my favorite from The Girl With Brown Fur is "The World of Barry." It deserves your attention.

Rhubarb is Susan (Simon DeDeo) has a brief review of "The World of Barry" on his blog:

"Stacey's work is billed as a 'story', but I'm going to issue an access card to the poetic avant garde because basically the prose-fiction of the contemporary moment is so broadly dire, unexamined, cacophanated by the unexamined-I that she may require refugee status with us." (Simon DeDeo at his blog, Rhubarb is Susan, [...].)
Nejind Nejind
The stories and tales in Stacey Levine's "The Girl with Brown Fur" give voice to atmospheres that
exist and persist, but are difficult to get to know in any sort of tangible way.

"Uppsala," the first such experience in her book, invites one in to an atmosphere of
family dreadfulness on the way to a destination informed by snow that falls like
a white mind circulating through and around the impossible tensions and dreads
the family traverses like a well woven web. This continues upon arriving.

It is both relief and homecoming to have this territory named and etched in compelling images,
dialogue, and exposition I've always known, heard, and read somewhere somehow, but never
discerned until this story, one I read and read again with shocked amazement and gratitude.