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eBook King and Goddess (King  Goddess) ePub

eBook King and Goddess (King Goddess) ePub

by Judith Tarr

  • ISBN: 0812550846
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Judith Tarr
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Assoc Llc (July 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 416
  • ePub book: 1123 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1286 kb
  • Other: txt mbr lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 669

Description

ISBN: 978-1-61138-530-4. At this very moment, in his tall palace set apart in walls from the rest of Thebes, the king offered wine in a golden cup and fruits of the earth on golden platters, as many as all his servants could carry, to the image of Amon in his ancestral shrine. By his offering the sun was persuaded to rise. By the strength of his devotion the Two Lands of Egypt measured their prosperity. It was a noble thing, to bring the sun back to the sky. Senenmut had never seen the rite, only heard of it.

She was in a fair rage. And she could indulge the barest fraction of it. This will be kept quiet, she said through clenched teeth. And you, O my scribe, will stand surety for it. ow. There was nothing of the lover in her now, and no remembrance of their nights together. She was queen wholly, and queen in wrath. What she said to Neferure he did not know. They spoke alone together in a chamber bare of listening places, with Nehsi on guard at the door. They spoke long; and when Neferure came out she was white and shaken, too shocked for tears

King and Goddess book. Judith Tarr's treatment of Hatshepsut's tale falls a touch short of the mark because it never delves very deeply into Hatshepsut's personality

King and Goddess book. Judith Tarr's treatment of Hatshepsut's tale falls a touch short of the mark because it never delves very deeply into Hatshepsut's personality. She comes across to the reader as too aloof and mysterious, and we're never able to sympathize with her enough to really understand why she makes the choices she makes.

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A Tom Doherty Associates book. A strong-headed queen becomes ruler of 2,000 BC Egypt.

I have recently finished King and Goddess, and I was not that impressed with the book. I have always enjoyed historical fiction as a way to learn about history without being bored to tears. Judith Tarr's book falls somewhere in the middle. The book is about Hatshepsut, an Egyptian queen who crowns herself King of Egypt. Although I am sure that the real Hatshepsut was an interesting person, this book does not really capture that aspect of her character. Egypt typically had male Kings, not female.

A fictional portrait of Queen Hatshepsut, a woman who loved her land too much to see it in the hands of one weak king after another, describes how she made a commoner her chief servant, her architect, and her secret paramour, and how she became pharaoh of all Egypt.

by Justine M. on August 19, 2017.

The Hounds of God. Judith Tarr. by Justine M. Rate it . You Rated it .

Written by Judith Tarr, narrated by Coleen Marlo. Tarr evokes Hatshepsut's ruthlessness as well as her vulnerability, and provides vivid portraits of Senenmut, Thutmose III and other real historical figures

Written by Judith Tarr, narrated by Coleen Marlo. Tarr evokes Hatshepsut's ruthlessness as well as her vulnerability, and provides vivid portraits of Senenmut, Thutmose III and other real historical figures.

Unfortunately, King and Goddess fails to do justice to the story. Tarr fails to show much in the way of character interaction and relationships. Although she explains what their relationships are, we never really get to see Hatshepsut's hatred for Thutmose II or her love for Senenmut

Unfortunately, King and Goddess fails to do justice to the story. Although she explains what their relationships are, we never really get to see Hatshepsut's hatred for Thutmose II or her love for Senenmut.

A fictional portrait of Queen Hatshepsut, a woman who loved her land too much to see it in the hands of one weak king after another, describes how she made a commoner her chief servant, her architect, and her secret paramour, and how she became pharaoh of all Egypt. Reprint.

Comments

watching to future watching to future
One of my favorites, and I was crushed when my paperback copy finally became unreadable. The kindle edition answered my prayers!

A compelling, intriguing story of Hatshepsut, who declared herself Pharaoh of Egypt in a time when a woman ruler of Egypt was unthinkable. Backed by detailed research without being slavishly devoted to verifiable historical fact (this is *fiction* after all) we see Hatshepsut's kingship through a web of relationships both personal and political.

I'm so glad to have this back on my shelves, and it's definitely worth a read.
Abywis Abywis
Wonderful book
Iaran Iaran
Greatly admired this historical whose details of ancient Egyptian politics feels all too contemporary. I'd written a poem about Hatshepsut long ago [below] and research Minoan history for future work, so the content/context were welcome and vivid. Fine scope, characterization, pace of the novel. Applaud the author's end Comments about how little is written about the great Egyptian monarch -- that just the verifiable facts read like wow fiction. This is an admirable MeToo, Times Up reading experience, crisp & thoughtful writing. lsbassen.com
THE WHITE QUEEN

Queen Hatshepsut sits in a New York museum,
her palms flat on her thighs.
She is white limestone. Her favorite was Senmut.
How like her neighbor Pasiphae and Daedelus!
The marble eyes of Hatshepsut saw the explosion
of Calliste, the first end of all the world.
Her brother-husband died, leaving
her to raise Thutmose III, his son, for twenty years.
During her reign, Egypt did not go to war, nor did it
gain ground. Hatshepsut has big bare flat feet.
The tips of her striped headdress cover her breasts,
but otherwise she sits nude in the New York Met.
Stepson Thutmose had her coffin stripped of gold.
Tourists and New Yorkers like me walk idly past her,
as ignorant of Hatshepsut as she of us, a sitting queen,
while we commoners move our limestone bones
about the museum, summer heat
of her Egypt beyond thick stone walls.
Kefrannan Kefrannan
I liked this book. I know that maybe Ms. Tarr did rearrange some facts and/or leave/embellish some information, but that doesn't diminish the story for me. This is a story about a young woman, who knows what she is capable of doing, and then does it. That young woman is Hatshepsut. She is married to her half-brother, whom she despises and whom she knows does not have the skills needed to be a good king. She suffers, not always in silence, because of this. Senenmut is her chief scribe and is visible throughout the story, not only as her friend and advisor but also as her lover. I thought that it was a very touching love story.
The story is filled with people who are intelligent and care deeply about the queen. I felt like I knew the characters, they were so well written. I guess it doesn't bother me about any historical inaccuracies, as long as the story is told well.
There were weak moments--the Puta expedition was one that stuck out in my mind. But overall an interesting book. I will have to look up "Child of the Morning" and see how it compares, since it is getting such good recommendations here.
Enjoy.
Tto Tto
I think if you are going to write about a historical person, even if that person lived some 4000 years ago, you should try to research the person and the era. Like many of the other reviewers this book suffers when compared to Pauline Gedge's beautiful recreation of Pharoaoh Hatshepsut's life: "Child of the Morning" which is so much more believable and so much better written. I was willing to see what another author could do with the story, after all, we don't know too many details about her life, only that she was the only female Pharaoh, a really unimaginable feat for that or any era in history! and she ruled for 22 years, and most likely had a commener lover named Semenket...but Ms Tarr did not pull it off at all in my opinion. It was not believable, I did not feel as if I was there.
Ynye Ynye
I have recently finished King and Goddess, and I was not that impressed with the book. I have always enjoyed historical fiction as a way to learn about history without being bored to tears. Judith Tarr's book falls somewhere in the middle. The book is about Hatshepsut, an Egyptian queen who crowns herself King of Egypt. Although I am sure that the real Hatshepsut was an interesting person, this book does not really capture that aspect of her character. Egypt typically had male Kings, not female. One would expect a terrible uproar or at least some plotting to get Hatshepsut off the throne, however; in this book, the Egyptian reactions are minimal. The book is entertaining, much like watching a miniseries, but it does not seem to capture the spirit of Egypt. I did enjoy the characters, Hatshepsut's Nubian bodyguard, Nehsi and her lover Senenmut. Unfortunately, the book was too much about people and not enough about history. It was similar to Diana Gabeldon's series, where the time the characters lived is just to make the story more interesting. If you want to learn about Hatshepsut, read a different book. If you are looking for an entertaining story about a woman who happened to crown herself King of Egypt, read this book.
Vijora Vijora
Hatshepsut is one of my favorite historical characters--the woman who took the Egyptian throne and declared herself . . . King! I love this interpretation of her.
If this was my first book about Hatshepsut or about ancient Egypt I would have probably loved it. But I am a big fan of Pauline Gedge and I have read her "Child of the Morning", which was much more interesting and more historically accurate. My advise, if you want to know more about Hatshepsut, pick up "Child of the Morning" and avoid "King and Goddess"