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eBook Sicilian Uncles ePub

eBook Sicilian Uncles ePub

by N.S. Thompson,Leonardo Sciascia

  • ISBN: 1862074380
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: N.S. Thompson,Leonardo Sciascia
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Granta Books (May 31, 2001)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1888 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1442 kb
  • Other: rtf azw mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 629

Description

Leonardo Sciascia (Italian pronunciation: (listen); 8 January 1921 – 20 November 1989) was a Sicilian writer, novelist, essayist, playwright, and politician

Leonardo Sciascia (Italian pronunciation: (listen); 8 January 1921 – 20 November 1989) was a Sicilian writer, novelist, essayist, playwright, and politician. Some of his works have been made into films, including Porte Aperte (1990; Open Doors), Cadaveri Eccellenti (1976; Illustrious Corpses), and Il giorno della civetta (1968; The Day of the Owl).

Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases and classic fiction. This polished surface conceals great depths of sophistication and an intense engagement with the moral and historical problems of modern Italy, especially of his native Sicily.

Leonardo Sciascia, N. S. Thompson, Arthur Oliver. The expression 'Sicilian uncle' has the same sense in Italian as 'Dutch uncle' does in English, but with sinister overtones of betrayal and inconstancy. The four novellas in Sicilian Uncles, originally published in 1958, are political thrillers of a kind - the first fruits of Sciascia's maturity. In these stories, illusions about ideology and history are lost in mirth, suffering and abandoned innocence

Leonardo Sciascia’s Sicilian Uncles, translated here from the Italian by .

Leonardo Sciascia’s Sicilian Uncles, translated here from the Italian by . Thompson, is a collection of four stories/novellas. Leonardo Sciascia, coltissimo e celebre scrittore siciliano, in questa raccolta ci presenta alcuni suoi racconti molto belli e tutti ambientati in Sicilia: 1) La zia d'America, dove ci narra l'arrivo degli Americani in un piccolo paesino siciliano e dell'amicizia tra il fanciullo protagonista della storia e un soldato americano; 2) La morte di Stalin, dove conosciamo un ciabattino comunista fin. LEONARDO SCIASCIA was born in Sicily in 1912 and died there in 1989.

by Leonardo Sciascia · . The four novellas in Sicilian Uncles (1958) political thrillers of a kind - are the first fruits of Sc. Una storia semplice. by Leonardo Sciascia.

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The expression 'Sicilian uncle' has the same sense in Italian as 'Dutch uncle' does in. . Crime, Thriller & Adventure.

The expression 'Sicilian uncle' has the same sense in Italian as 'Dutch uncle' does in English, but with sinister overtones of betrayal and inconstancy. The four vellas in Sicilian Uncles, originally published in 1958, are political thrillers of a kind - the first fruits of Sciascia's maturity. Used availability for Leonardo Sciascia's Sicilian Uncles. January 1986 : UK Hardback. The four novellas in Sicilian Uncles (1958) political thrillers of a kind - are the first fruits of Sciascia's maturity. In these stories, illusions about ideology and history are lost in mirth, in suffering, and innocence is abandoned.

The expression 'Sicilian uncle' has the same sense in Italian as 'Dutch uncle' does in English, but with sinister overtones of betrayal and inconstancy. The four novellas in Sicilian Uncles (1958) political thrillers of a kind - are the first fruits of Sciascia's maturity. In these stories, illusions about ideology and history are lost in mirth, in suffering, and innocence is abandoned. Each novella has its historical moment: the Allied invasion of Sicily, the Spanish Civil War, the death of Stalin, the 'events' of 1948. These occasions and their consequences are registered in the lives of Sciascia's wonderfully drawn characters. Each has voice, wit, and a private history which open out onto the wider circumstances of his time, and hint towards the later work of Sciascia.

Comments

Adaly Adaly
An extraordinary collection of novellas about transformational times in Sicilian history. Sciascia, a great writer, was also lucky in his translator; the passages toward the end of the last story, about Italians (and told by one poor Sicilian) in the Spanish Civil War are as eloquent and as shattering as the end of Moby Dick, and that is saying quite a lot. If you respond to sublime writing, great intelligence, and stories infused with history and a sense of the human condition, you need to read Sicilian Uncles.
Viashal Viashal
Leonardo Sciascia (1921-1989) is best known for his detective novels set in Sicily - though the point should be made that they transcend the genre of crime fiction. Given its title, SICILIAN UNCLES sounds like yet another work of crime fiction. In actuality, it is a collection of four stories (31 to 61 pages in length) that are historical in nature. But they too are part of Sciascia's lifelong body of work exploring the social and political milieu of Sicily. In these stories Sciascia depicts aspects of the anarchy that is Sicily in the context of four historical episodes.

The first story is "The American Aunt". Its setting is 1943 to 1948, beginning with the Allied invasion of Sicily. Many Sicilians already had relatives in the United States, and with the American occupation of Sicily the importance and influence of the United States increased. For Italy, the first major political decision was between the Monarchy and the Republic (behind which there loomed the specter of eventual Communism). Sciascia develops these two situations through the narrative of a young Sicilian boy whose aunt had emigrated to the United States (Brooklyn), made a providentially affluent marriage, and was now striving to order the affairs and channel the religious, political, and social views of her relatives back in Sicily. This is the most conventional story in the book and, to my mind, the best.

In "The Death of Stalin", Sciascia chronicles the continuously tested optimism and idealism of a Sicilian communist between 1939 and 1956. It is a good account of the confusion and anxiety that Stalin engendered among the European proletariat who had adopted the populist communist vision of a just workers' society, but it is only so-so as a story.

"Forty-Eight", the title of the third story, has become Sicilian slang for "disorder or confusion". It is derived from the events of 1848 when a revolution against the Bourbons resulted in a brief period of nominal independence but practical anarchy. The story is an entertaining, oft-amusing account, as played out in one small city, of the vacillating political fortunes of the monarchists versus the liberals between 1847 and 1860, when Garibaldi conquered the island (eventually to install, to the dismay of many of his supporters, a new monarchy). Especially noteworthy in the story are the arrogance and hypocrisy of both the nobility and the Roman Catholic Church.

Finally, "Antimony" is the story of a Sicilian fighting with the troops that Mussolini sent to Spain between 1936 and 1938 to support Franco and the Fascists in the Spanish Civil War. The narrator is essentially apolitical; he is fighting more or less as a mercenary, in order to make money inasmuch as he no longer can deal with the dangers of the Sicilian sulphur mines where he had labored. Eventually he realizes that "of all Mussolini's faults, that of having sent over thousands of Italian poor to fight the Spanish poor can never be forgiven him." In the end, the story has more to say about the strange dynamics of the Spanish Civil War than it does about Sicily. Arguably Sciascia tries to do too much with this story, but withal it is packed with noteworthy observations of history, philosophy, and politics.

SICILIAN UNCLES is not a great book, but it is commendable historical fiction, the sort that both instructs and entertains. As such, for the general reader I give it a moderate recommendation. However, for those with a special interest in Sicily (or, in the case of "Antimony", those with a special interest in the Spanish Civil War), my recommendation is stronger.
Unereel Unereel
Something of a surprise to receive this book but it was in good condition. Interesting read.
fetish fetish
A great story about the Spanish Civil War, the only one I know of written by an Italian author. It gives the Italian point of view so a contrast is established between the fascists and their goals and that of the protagonist who is a volunteer for the fascist army. The protagonist was misled so there is irony in the story because he ends up fighting peasants, people like himself.
Vozilkree Vozilkree
as an avid Sciascia reader, was glad to add this book to my collection. am only a few pages into it, but it seems to be vintage Sciascia who is always a great read, especially if you develop an interest in Sicily.
Rich Vulture Rich Vulture
Sciacia at his finest! All Sicilian-Americans should read Sciascia.
Zyniam Zyniam
Great writer; provides insight into Sicilian culture.
I have wanted to read something by Leonardo Sciascia for some now, but the one or two books I tried initially were very difficult to access. “Sicilian Uncles”, by contrast, is fascinating and provides insight into aspects of Italian political history over the last 150 years. In these four “long stories”, Sciascia gives a very human insight into how individuals shaped or were shaped by big events - the struggle for Italian unity, the Spanish Civil War, the invasion of Sicily in 1942 and the death of Stalin. He mixes humour, irony, drama and tragedy to great effect. Highly recommended.