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eBook Forever War, The ePub

eBook Forever War, The ePub

by Joe Haldeman

  • ISBN: 0060510862
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Joe Haldeman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Voyager (September 2, 2003)
  • Pages: 277
  • ePub book: 1866 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1691 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf doc azw
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 303

Description

The Forever War is one such book, and like those others still carries with it that air of recognition and possibility. About the author The Forever War was Joe Haldeman's second published novel. It remains the work for which he is best known

The Forever War is one such book, and like those others still carries with it that air of recognition and possibility. Jonathan Lethem, author of Gun With Occcasional Music, Fortress of Solitude. Perhaps the most important war novel written since Vietnam. It remains the work for which he is best known. He has written more than 30 novels and received every major industry award. Haldeman's long, successful career has won him a Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and placement in the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. 5 people found this helpful.

The Forever War (1974) is a military science fiction novel by American author Joe Haldeman, telling the contemplative story of soldiers fighting an interstellar war between Man and the Taurans

The Forever War (1974) is a military science fiction novel by American author Joe Haldeman, telling the contemplative story of soldiers fighting an interstellar war between Man and the Taurans. It won the Nebula Award in 1975 and the Hugo and the Locus awards in 1976. Forever Free (1999) and Forever Peace (1997) are respectively, direct and thematic sequel novels.

The Forever War book. First published in 1974 and winner of the 1975 Hugo and Locus awards, Forever War by Joe Haldeman kicks ass. And the welfare recipients get a bag of dope with their check.

The Forever War is one such book, and like those others still carries with it that air of recognition and possibility. Jonathan Lethem That it happens to be set in the future only broadens and enhances its message. The Forever War does what the very best science fiction does: It deals with extremes both societal and teleological; it places a frame around humankind’s place in the universe to show us what is outside the frame; and it functions simultaneously at the literal and metaphorical level.

Haldeman Jo. he Forever War by Joe Haldeman AUTHOR’S NOTE This is the definitive version of The Forever War. There are two other versions, and my publisher has been kind enough to allow inc to clarify things here

Haldeman Jo. There are two other versions, and my publisher has been kind enough to allow inc to clarify things here. The one you’re holding in your hand is the book as it was originally written. But it has a pretty tortuous history. It’s ironic, since it later won the Hugo and Nebula Awards, and has won Best Novel awards in other. This is the definitive version of The Forever War.

Awards by Joe Haldeman. LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT. Joe Haldeman, The Forever War. (Series: ) Thank you for reading books on GrayCity. 2010 Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award for Lifetime Achievement. 2009 Robert A. Heinlein Award. 2004 Southeastern Science Fiction Lifetime Achievement Award. 1996 New England Science Fiction Association Skylark Award (along with Gay Haldeman). 1989 Interzone Poll All Time Best Science Fiction Author.

Keep in mind what I’ve said while the First Sergeant instructs you more specifically in what your duties will be under this command. He turned on his heel and strode out of the room

Keep in mind what I’ve said while the First Sergeant instructs you more specifically in what your duties will be under this command. He turned on his heel and strode out of the room. The expression on his face hadn’t changed one millimeter during the whole harangue. The First Sergeant moved like a heavy machine with lots of ball bearings.

Private William Mandella is a hero in spite of himself -- a reluctant conscript drafted into an elite military unit, and propelled through space and time to fight in a distant thousand-year conflict. He never wanted to go to war, but the leaders on Earth have drawn a line in the interstellar sand -- despite the fact that their fierce alien enemy is unknowable, unconquerable, and very far away. So Mandella will perform his duties without rancor and even rise up through the military's ranks . . . if he survives. But the true test of his mettle will come when he returns to Earth. Because of the time dilation caused by space travel the loyal soldier is aging months, while his home planet is aging centuries -- and the difference will prove the saying: you never can go home. . .

Comments

Welen Welen
I haven't read sci-fi in many years (it was my passion as a teen, but I'm long past that period of my life now), so I was pleasantly surprised by the writing and intellectual quality of The Forever War. It is a provocative novel that uses the Theory of Relativity to show us how much the world changes over the 100s of years that actually pass while the space warriors are on missions that last for months. Shifts in social and sexual mores that occur during the protagonist's three combat missions are jarring for him, yet he manages to hold to his personal principles and beliefs. The parallels with Vietnam are clearly intentional (since the author fought in Vietnam), and the returning soldiers are greeted not as heroes but as oddities in a culture that has foresworn war and made peace with an enemy that had slaughtered many of the men and women's friends. This novel is the kind of thoughtful science fiction that I used to love, and I'm delighted to know that such books are still being written. Bring on more!
Cozius Cozius
I first read this many years ago, but seeing it at a bargain price of $1 over the Black Friday weekend was irresistible.
It's been good to revisit it, too. Sure, I remembered an awful lot, but times have changed in our world since then, which makes for something of a good parallel with the tale itself.
For those unfamiliar with the book, it's the story of William Mandella, a soldier fighting in deep space for humanity - but the faster than light travel that carries him and his fellow soldiers into battle also means that while only a year or two may pass for them, many years pass on the Earth they are fighting for.
Before they know it, the world they left behind is almost unrecognisable to the soldiers - and the only remnant of the world gone by are the soldiers themselves, finding in one another the familiarity they can no longer see in society.
There are obvious connections here to the veterans who returned from Vietnam - Haldeman himself served there - and came home to a country they struggled to fit into after the horrors they had experienced.
Among the changes they see are changing attitudes to sexuality over the years. I've seen people criticise the book for Mandella's attitude to homosexuality, which becomes more prominent in society in the decades in which he's off fighting alien aggressors, but really that's a representation of both Mandella's place and time, and I would argue a positive showing an increased acceptance of homosexuality. Sure, Mandella has a struggle to accept that - but he struggles to accept everything about the changed world. He is a man literally out of time, with regard to just about every aspect of society.
It truly is a visionary novel, tackling heavyweight subjects of how you go on fighting for a world you no longer recognise, even as you do your duty.
If you've never read it, trust me, put it on your reading list - it truly is one of the greats.
Tantil Tantil
It's certainly a good book and I enjoyed reading it, however I think that it has lost something since being written. Maybe its tremendous impact on the SciFi genre is working against it when read today. Specifically, the concepts which were novel when this was written, have become SciFi tropes and standards, which since have executed with greater breadth and resolution. The book's length also works against it in that it's hard to flush out concepts when the timeline of the book is millennia and the book is less than 300 pages. I'm not sure it is fair to criticise the odd anachronistic future technology already surpassed today, but it was somewhat jarring at times. For all the criticism I have, it is absolutely a required read for any lover of Science Fiction. It is one of the corner stones that the modern genre is built on and an enjoyable read.
Ariurin Ariurin
One of the finest novels to be written in the wake of the Vietnam War and probably the best military SF novel ever written, The Forever War is one conscripted soldier’s journey through space and time as he fights a mysterious enemy and is pressed further and further into a faceless military machine. The author, Joe Haldeman, served as an army engineer in Vietnam and based the story on the letters he wrote home to his wife. This is probably what gives the book, though abounding in page-turning battles, its remarkably human touch.

Forever War, written in Haldeman’s terse Hemingway-esque prose, is as masculine as it is tender and heartbreaking. It shows not only a soldier’s gritty experience of war but also his inability to escape it upon returning home. This one deserves to be read by every self-respecting SF fan, even ones that aren’t into military fiction.
GoodLike GoodLike
William Mandella has been drafted into a war against an alien race. Not only does he worry about facing the alien race, but he also has to deal with the fact that space travel has him fighting for an Earth that he doesn't even know anymore.

This is truly a unique novel. I've never read anything like it, so if you are looking for something completely different I highly recommend picking this up. The isolation, despair and fear fully come through in the writing, making the reader care instantly what happens to Mandella. The only slight issue I had with the book was the choppiness of the narrative. I'm assuming this is supposed to give the reader a sense of the disconnect Mandella has with others because of the time travel, but it did make it so the story felt at times incomplete.